Canon 10-22 - flash

Discussion in 'Canon' started by jazu, May 8, 2008.

  1. jazu

    jazu Guest

    I made some interior shots. Looks like this lens needs external flash. Lens
    is so big that produce shadow when usind internal flash.
    Another bucks to spend:)
     
    jazu, May 8, 2008
    #1
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  2. jazu

    Dev/Null Guest

    Neither the 430EX or the 580EX will cover a lens that wide. Most pros
    shooting interiors don't use on camera flash, nor built-in flash.
     
    Dev/Null, May 8, 2008
    #2
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  3. jazu

    jazu Guest

    I think I will have to work on that:)
     
    jazu, May 8, 2008
    #3
  4. jazu

    jazu Guest

    How about bouncing flash from the ceiling?
     
    jazu, May 8, 2008
    #4
  5. Could work, but depending on the focal length you´re using it´s likely that
    you will see the light spot on the ceiling in your pictures. You better
    depend on available light, use proper lightning equipment (what´s what i
    would recommend if you´re planning to go commercial with that type of photos
    anyway) or try to bounce the flash backwards behind you on a reflector or
    try a lightsphere or something like this ...

    Markus
     
    Markus Fuenfrocken, May 8, 2008
    #5
  6. A Sto-Fen diffuser on the flash will provide ample coverage. It even
    works with a full-frame fisheye. Plus, it reduces the harshness of
    direct flash.

    As a pro, I do a lot of interiors with on-camera flash, but they are more
    for documentation than to send to Architectural Digest. Instead of it
    taking me and two assistants 2 hours per shot using off-camera lights
    (flash or hots), I, just myself alone with a single camera with one
    flash, can photograph an entire home or office, etc. in 30 minutes, and
    provide the client with what he needs at an inexpensive price. It's not
    the glamorous type of photography you see in the movies, but it pays the
    bills. It's called Bread-and-Butter work.

    Stef
     
    Stefan Patric, May 8, 2008
    #6
  7. jazu

    TRoss Guest


    Now you've done it. It's been almost a year since Rita has shown the
    Thong....


    TR
     
    TRoss, May 8, 2008
    #7
  8. jazu

    user Guest

    Will it do it with the built-in flash on a 30D? I would have thought
    one would need to get the diffuser farther forward to get coverage with
    a 10 mm focal length lens, without a shadow. That should be doable,
    however.

    Doug McDonald
     
    user, May 8, 2008
    #8
  9. I don't know. Never have used the built-in flash. Sto-Fen does make a
    gadget that works with a built-in flash, but consider this: that flash
    isn't all that powerful to being with, and increasing the angle of
    coverage to cover the 10-22 will halve the guide number at least. Just
    get an shoe mount flash for your camera of reasonable power--GN at least
    110 (65 degree angle of coverage) for EI 100--and the appropriate Sto-
    Fen, and you're set.

    http://www.stofen.com/

    You don't have to worry about the shadow of the lens with a shoe mounted
    flash showing in the shot. It is projected more downward than outward.
    Just do a test with the built-in flash without a diffuser with the
    10-22. If you see the shadow of the lens, then even with a diffuser, it
    will still be there.

    Stef
     
    Stefan Patric, May 9, 2008
    #9
  10. This is incorrect. On the 300D with the 10-22 at 10mm, the 430EX covers the
    whole field with no problem, although you do have to flip out the built-in
    diffuser that makes it cover a 14mm _equivalent_ angle of view. (10mm is a
    16mm equiv. AOV, so there's no problem, and the 430 is plenty high enough so
    that there's no shadow thrown into the image area, even with the hood on the
    10-20.)
    This is, I suspect, correct. Using flash with that wide a lens means that
    things that are close (the nearby parts of the walls, floors and ceilings)
    are way overexposed relative to stuff on the other side of the room, so it's
    not optimal. Using bounce flash helps, but the same problem still happens.

    The house I grew up in is about to be sold, and since it's still in very
    similar condition to those days (1960s) I need to do a seriously good job
    documenting it before some rich lawyer with an architect in tow guts it and
    turns it into a modern monstrosity.

    (I pulled the 300D + 10-22 out of the attic and tested, so the above stuff
    really is correct.)

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, May 13, 2008
    #10
  11. jazu

    Paul J Gans Guest

    Yup. Physics still works.
     
    Paul J Gans, May 13, 2008
    #11
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