Canon 8000f flatbed scanner for neg scanning- opinions

Discussion in 'Canon' started by nt, Aug 15, 2003.

  1. nt

    nt Guest

    I was looking at a couple of canon scanners, nemeley the 8000f and 5000f
    does anyone have any experience with these two models for scanning negs??
    they are both 2400dpi models
    how big is the scan in width/height dpi, at its highest scan resolution? ie,
    if you were to open the file in photoshop, what would be the pixel
    dimensions?
    how large can you print up to (acceptably) if you send it to a digital lab??
    can it print sharply up to say, A3??
    thanks
    nt
     
    nt, Aug 15, 2003
    #1
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  2. nt

    snaps! Guest

    I had a 5000f briefly and equally briefly, a 9900f. The scanner interface
    allows you to select an output size and dpi up to it's maximum capabilities.
    To get it larger in PhotoShop, resize it!

    Having said that... I could have output A3 from 35mm scans to my Canon S9000
    printer and the prints look just like photo prints. I found the 5000f much
    better at scanning Fuji negatives than the 9900f. The major problem with all
    these flatbed film scanners is the woeful speed of scan. The 5000f will take
    10 to 15 minutes to scan a single frame so if you thought you'd scan your
    wedding shots of 90 frames and output proofs in the same week... You'll need
    more patience than me!

    I gave up and ditched the scanners. I bought digital cameras and apart from
    the odd behaviour of electronic cameras with someone else's idea of camera
    settings, I haven't looked back. A SD9 Sigma or 10D Canon costs about half
    the price of a good film scanner and gives you hi-res files straight from
    the camera. No dust, scratches or grain to worry about. Most Digi labs can
    print at least 20" x 30" prints from these cameras or you can spend a grand
    or two and get an A3 photo printer to do it yourself.

    Doug
     
    snaps!, Aug 15, 2003
    #2
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