Canon EF 100mm Macro

Discussion in 'Canon' started by Andrew MacBeth, Aug 12, 2003.

  1. Hi All -

    A quick question regarding Canon's 100mm EF Macro lens...

    To get 1:1 reproduction, how close is the front lens element to the subject?..

    Please tell me it's a workable distance, and not a few inches......

    Cheers,
    Andrew.
    www.andrewmacbeth.com
     
    Andrew MacBeth, Aug 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. $A quick question regarding Canon's 100mm EF Macro lens...
    $
    $To get 1:1 reproduction, how close is the front lens element to the subject?..

    It depends on which 100mm EF macro lens it is. The working distance
    for the EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM is 149mm, according to the Canon Camera
    Museum. I'm having no luck finding the working distance for the
    older, discontinued EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro lens, but I believe its working
    distance is shorter.[/QUOTE]
     
    Stephen M. Dunn, Aug 12, 2003
    #2
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  3. Andrew MacBeth

    Bill Hilton Guest

    From: (Andrew MacBeth)
    According to the manual "closest focus distance" is 1 ft or .31 meters.
     
    Bill Hilton, Aug 12, 2003
    #3
  4. $>From: (Andrew MacBeth)
    $>To get 1:1 reproduction, how close is the front lens element to the
    $>subject?..
    $
    $According to the manual "closest focus distance" is 1 ft or .31 meters.

    Focus distance is measured from the film plane to the subject, so
    you have to subtract the lens register and the physical length of the
    lens to find out how far the front lens element is to the subject
    (the working distance).

    Both are very useful pieces of information, though.[/QUOTE]
     
    Stephen M. Dunn, Aug 12, 2003
    #4
  5. Cheers- thanks very much.

    Andrew.
     
    Andrew MacBeth, Aug 12, 2003
    #5
  6. Andrew MacBeth

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    Tony Spadaro, Aug 12, 2003
    #6
  7. This suggests that some manufacturers "cheat" by arranging the close
    focussing of the lens to be achieved by reducing the focal length of the
    lens. Well, actually, that all manufacturers do it at least a bit, but
    some do it a lot. A strictly 100 mm lens should have an object distance
    of 200 mm (note for distances quoted in metric mm is preferred to cm).
    For any lens of focal length f the object distance at 1:1 reproduction
    is 2f. This would of course be measured from the "object" (i.e. the
    item being photographed) to the front nodal plane of the lens, a
    somewhat variable feature but typically about 1/3 of the way in from the
    front element (and note that macro lenses often have deeply recessed
    front elements). The Pentax lens clearly reduces f to about 60 - 65 mm
    at the close focus, i.e. not far from a 50 mm lens.

    Personally I think it is a bit of a con to do this to the Pentax extent;
    if I wanted a 50 mm macro (which this almost is) I could buy one for a
    lot less money!
     
    David Littlewood, Aug 12, 2003
    #7
  8. That is from the film plane, not the front of the lens.

    --
    Paul Repacholi 1 Crescent Rd.,
    +61 (08) 9257-1001 Kalamunda.
    West Australia 6076
    comp.os.vms,- The Older, Grumpier Slashdot
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    Paul Repacholi, Aug 13, 2003
    #8
  9. Yes. The classic Nikkor 4/105 which does not use focal-length
    reducing tricks has a lens to subject distance of 17.5 cm
    at 1:1 (with the PN-11 extension ring) - more than any
    AF macro lens of that focal length.

    Another reason for shorter lens to subject distance might
    be a deeply recessed front element. I don't know if this is the
    case for the pentax macro.

    Regards,
    Chris
     
    Christoph Breitkopf, Aug 13, 2003
    #9
  10. I didn't have a focusing rail, but I got the model to switch to a table with
    casters.........
     
    William Graham, Aug 13, 2003
    #10
  11. SNIP
    So you got the model his/her own set of wheels... ,
    that often does the trick ;-)

    Bart
     
    Bart van der Wolf, Aug 13, 2003
    #11
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