Canon Lens's?

Discussion in 'Canon' started by Keith (Southend)G, Mar 3, 2009.

  1. I wonder if someone could help me here.
    I am looking at purchasing a Canon EOS 450D Digital SLR Camera which
    comes with a 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 IS Lens, but am chewing over a couple
    things. Many years ago I had a trusty Canon A1 with a 28mm, 50mm and
    80-200mm Zoom. On the 28mm I often used a Polarising Filter which gave
    great results.

    A couple of basic questions I guess.

    1.What is the difference between an EF and an EF-S Lens?
    2.Also in the listings they refer to USM and IS USM, what does this
    mean?
    3.Polarising Filter(s), Are there different types used for Digital SLR
    Cameras, or will the old circular ones still give good results. I
    think I once had an issue with the auto light on a Minolta which
    rendered the filter useless.

    Many thanks

    Keith (Southend)
     
    Keith (Southend)G, Mar 3, 2009
    #1
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  2. Keith (Southend)G

    jimkramer Guest

    EF lenses will fit on any of the Canon EOS Cameras (Film, Full Frame
    Digital, and Cropped Frame Digital.) EF-S lenses will only fit on the 1.6X
    Cropped Frame Digital Cameras and I believe there was an APS format film
    camera that supported the EF-S lens too.

    USM - Ultra Sonic Motor - Faster focusing motors.
    IS - Image Stabilization - There is a moveable element in the lens which
    will counteract some of the motion blur caused by the camera operator.
    Great for hand holding, not so good for tripods, but you can turn the IS
    off.

    Circular polarizer is still best for the Digital cameras as it preserves the
    metering.

    -Jim
     
    jimkramer, Mar 3, 2009
    #2
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  3. Keith (Southend)G

    Ron Recer Guest

    The size, EF lens will work on 'full frame' cameras as well as the smaller
    DSLRs that use a sensor smaller than a 35mm film frame. EF-S lens will only
    work on the smaller sensors like the 350, 400, 450, 20D, 30D,40D, 50D, etc.
    IS is image stabilization and will allow you to take photos in lower light
    and hand hold longer telephoto lens. USM has to do with the system used to
    focus the lens in the AF mode.
    I use a circular polarized filter on my 28-135 lens and I believe they are
    the ones recommended for digital cameras.

    Ron
     
    Ron Recer, Mar 3, 2009
    #3
  4. Thank you for your replies, my understand is better now.

    Keith (Southend)
     
    Keith (Southend)G, Mar 3, 2009
    #4
  5. Still chewing things over here.

    I'm inclined to NOT have the 18-55mm lens, which they seem to sell as
    a package.

    But instead go for both the 28mm and 50mm EF Lenses. (Maybe in the
    future a 55-200mm zoom lens). One advantage I see is that ALL 3 lenses
    have a 52mm Filter size, whereas the 18-55 has a 58mm. Strangely,
    looking at just Canon Lens's on the Jessops website the 18-55mm
    doesn't appear!

    http://www.jessops.com/online.store/Products/Search.html

    The main reason for my post was what were the thoughts on the
    difference between the 18-55mm zoom compared to the fixed 28mm &
    50mm.?

    Many thanks

    Keith (Southend)
     
    Keith (Southend)G, Mar 5, 2009
    #5
  6. On 5 Mar, 10:14, "Keith (Southend)G" <>
    wrote:

    Just shows my understanding wasn't as good as I thought.

    Just been into Jessops and now understand what the 1.6x factor is. Had
    I purchased a 28mm and a 50mm lens in fact I would have got the
    equivilent of a 45mm and 80mm focal length respectively, in old money.
    So the 18 - 55mm zoom looks pretty handy as this would be the
    equivilent to a 29 - 28mm zoom, again in old money. Better still, the
    55 - 200mm zoom now is in effect 88 - 320mm.
    Of course a fixed 18mm and 32mm would be expensive, so narrows down
    my options !

    http://porters.com/LENS COMPATIBILE.pdf

    Could anyone advise how a Polaroid Circular Filter performs with an 18
    - 55mm zoom, I think this is probably the last hurdle in making a
    decision, I Think ;-) ?

    Many thanks

    Keith (Southend)
    http://www.southendweather.net
     
    Keith (Southend)G, Mar 5, 2009
    #6
  7. Keith (Southend)G

    Joel Guest

    *If* just talking about the 1.6F factor then you are correct. But
    sometime we look at the quality of the lens and what it may be capable of.
    There are many web pages with lens and cameras review, but I don't know
    more than few and I like www.fredmiranda.com the most as there I can see the
    negative/possitive (as well as sicko) feedbacks.

    Example some sicko feedback like giving the good lens 1/5 STAR *because*
    the mailman delivered to a wrong address, the order was back order etc..
    when those have nothing to do with the QUALITY of the lens.
     
    Joel, Mar 5, 2009
    #7
  8. Keith (Southend)G

    Colin.D Guest

    Polarizers work best with a fairly narrow fiels of view, i.e. longer
    focal lengths. Short or wide-angle lenses don't do so well with
    polarizers because the the lighting angle varies across the field of
    view, and the polarizer is affected by light angle.

    Colin D.
     
    Colin.D, Mar 5, 2009
    #8
  9. Keith (Southend)G

    Tass Guest

    If the 18-55 lense is the 18-55 lense with IS (image stabilization) it is a
    really nice kit lense. Not at all like the previous plain 18-55. (I have
    replace it with the Canon 28-135 IS which I really like.) The 55-200, I
    have and I am disappointed with it. I would get the camera with the 18-55
    IS kit lense and save up for a better lense than the 55-220. Don't forget
    SIGMA too. I am considering one of theirs for my next lense.
     
    Tass, Mar 6, 2009
    #9
  10. Keith (Southend)G

    Joel Guest

    I always buy BODY only to know much about the lens-kit, but I read the
    18-55 non-IS may not be a good lens but good for the money (they figure it
    costs around $100).

    And I don't know how much Canon charges for the 18-55 IS, but I have Tarom
    17-50 f2.8 and happy with it. I don't remember exactly how much I paid for
    it but I guess somewhere around more/less $400 (less than $400?).
     
    Joel, Mar 6, 2009
    #10
  11. Keith (Southend)G

    Tass Guest

    You might consider reading the reviews in the Canon 18-55 IS that is now
    coming standard with the XSi. It is really a nice lense...way above the
    18-55 kit lense.
     
    Tass, Mar 6, 2009
    #11
  12. Keith (Southend)G

    Joel Guest

    I didn't read the review but I believe I have read about it's been the
    lens-kit for newer models for around 2 years or so now. And I am indoor
    photographer so all my lens are f2.8 or larger except the Bigma 50-500mm
    F4-5.6
     
    Joel, Mar 6, 2009
    #12

  13. The 18-55mm IS I think is non USM, but buying the EOS 450D Body only
    comes in as £449 and with the 18-55mm IS is £495 (£46 difference), yet
    the cost of the 18-55mm IS on it's own is £169, so I'd be a fool not
    to take it? Sorry about the long link.

    http://www.jessops.com/online.store...EF-S 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 IS Lens-70092/Show.html

    Then I also get a Canon £25 off purchase card before 31st March), if I
    buy the Camera before 11th March, and now I understand the DSLR (1.6x)
    focal length better, I am inclined to get the 55-200mm EF USM Zoom
    which is £225.10 - then £25 off.

    http://www.jessops.com/online.store...non/EF55-200mm F4.55.6 MK2 USM-2523/Show.html

    I already have 2 Skylight 1B filters 52mm and 58mm, so I can use them
    for protecting the len's, but I will have to get the circular
    polariser for the 58mm thread on the 18-55mm lens and see how it goes.

    Some of the fixed lens's look nice but are very expensive.

    I also think I'll go for the Jessops extra insurance for three years
    warranty (£69)

    It will be nice to get back into SLR photography after about 20 years,
    kids to bring up, but now they're both at UNI ;-)

    Thanks for your comments

    Keith (Southend)
    http://www.southendweather.net
     
    Keith (Southend)G, Mar 7, 2009
    #13
  14. Keith (Southend)G

    Joel Guest

    Depending on your goal, many people don't look at thing the same way you
    do (as you don't look at thing the same way many other do). Or many people
    when they have the taste of the top-of-the-line-lens they don't want to go
    for the 2nd best, and they feel spending $$$ on cheaper lens makes the cost
    of top-lens become more expensive.

    IOW, if you spend $169 on the 18-55mm IS lens, then later you fall in love
    with the $1200 Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L. And if you go for it then the
    chance for you to use the 18-55mm is pretty rare, so it will wring the total
    cost higher. Or you spend more $$$ on several lens but end up using only
    the best lens.

    Me? I won't take it for sure, and that's why I always buy the BODY only.
     
    Joel, Mar 7, 2009
    #14
  15. Fair point Joel, but my main use for a camera is holidays and I would
    be very aware of attracting attention with something too expensive on
    my person. So I guess it is always a compromise, but I really couldn't
    justify the expense of one of the more top of the range models. But
    that's not to say I would'nt love one ;-)

    All the best

    Keith (Southend)
     
    Keith (Southend)G, Mar 7, 2009
    #15
  16. Some good points there j.f.

    The warranty concern was that I always seem to get a problem of some
    sorts with any electrical / camera type item, although after I've then
    got either a replacement or it's been fixed, it's ok. I guess the
    problem normally occurs in the first year which would have a full
    cover anyway. So I will take your advice and not through money away
    with the extended warranty ;-)

    As for the lens, I have a dilemma, I think I will get the the 18-55mm
    (£46) that comes with it and see how it goes as far as the quality I
    am looking for. It maybe that the finer qualities, that many would
    require on this group, may not be an issue with me, but only time will
    tell.

    So then if I did want to go for another lens, what would I go for ?
    The thought of paying more than £400 ($560) for one lens takes some
    swallowing, so I guess I'm back to square 1 and looking at say the
    55-200mm EF USM 225.10 ($317), although reading some reviews this gets
    pulled apart. But would I really notice the fine aspects with the
    pictures I take on holidays?

    I was also looking at Hoya Polarizing filters and a proper case for
    the camera and Amazon.co.uk comes out at half price to Jessops, so as
    these items are not the big bits of kit, I may go that route.

    Again, thank you for all the comments and views it has helped
    immensely. I have looked at many reviews for some of the Canon
    products and it does give you a good idea of what quality one can
    expect for the money you're paying.

    Best regards

    Keith (Southend)
     
    Keith (Southend)G, Mar 8, 2009
    #16
  17. Keith (Southend)G

    DRS Guest

    [...]
    The 18-55 IS is a more than decent kit lens optically. I emphasise the IS -
    the 18-55, which is also (and inexplicably) still available, is a dog. The
    18-55 IS will be £46 well spent.

    As an alternative I'd suggest you look at the 17-85 as a walk around lens,
    freeing you up for something like the 70-200 f4 (or even the f2.8) as its
    complement later on.
     
    DRS, Mar 8, 2009
    #17
  18. Thanks DRS,

    Wow, just looked up that 70-200 f2.8 lens £1719 (US$2422). Seriously
    though I don't see me needing one. If I was photographing sports
    events etc, it would be great, however, unless I get back into taking
    pictures big time, I think I'll hold fire.

    Thanks

    Keith (Southend)
     
    Keith (Southend)G, Mar 8, 2009
    #18
  19. I'm beginning to come around to your idea of buying the body only and
    then getting the EF-S 17-85mm IS USM, even though it's as much as the
    body :-0 £459 (US$647). (Gosh, you can't take it with you!)

    http://www.jessops.com/online.store...non/EF-S 17-85mm f4-5.6 IS USM-1123/Show.html

    Just looked through the filters I already have and I have a Hoya
    Polarizing circular 67mm thread, which is the same thread that the
    17-85 takes + the 17 - 85mm "The filter thread is 67mm. It does not
    rotate on autofocusing"
    http://www.dpreview.com/lensreviews/canon_17-85_4-5p6_is_usm_c16/page2.asp

    All good stuff for "focusing" the mind ;-)

    Keith (Southend)
     
    Keith (Southend)G, Mar 8, 2009
    #19
  20. Keith (Southend)G

    Joel Guest

    Point your browser to www.fredmiranda.com and spend few hours (days)
    reading the end users' feedbacks to have some idea what you can expect from
    the lens.
     
    Joel, Mar 8, 2009
    #20
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