Canon Vixia HF10 and AVHCD in FCP

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by PIXELFLIP, Apr 4, 2008.

  1. PIXELFLIP

    PIXELFLIP Guest

    Who picked one of these up?

    Anyone used an HF10 in their Final Cut workflow? Would love to hear
    about their experience...
     
    PIXELFLIP, Apr 4, 2008
    #1
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  2. PIXELFLIP

    Smarty Guest

    I've been playing with some AVCHD authoring using HF10 content using PC
    software, and have found it to be extremely sluggish on most of my hardware.
    When I move it onto a quad core very high performance QX 9650 machine here,
    then the workflow becomes very manageable.

    I mention all of this in raising the concern that you be sure to find
    someone using somewhat equivalent hardware to what you are expecting to use
    for FCP. My prior 8 core MacPro ran FCP much, much faster than the earlier
    MacPro or PowerMac dual G5 platforms. I strongly suspect that AVCHD will not
    be smoothy / easily handled on most older / smaller Macs, despite the Apple
    Intermediate Codec.

    Smarty
     
    Smarty, Apr 4, 2008
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  3. Yes, I have experience that you need a beefy machine to use the HF10.

    In fact I found out that the PowerPc g4 and g5 will not even recognize
    the video camera.

    Anyone else experience this. I was trying to hold off buying a MBP
    till then end of year.

    - Alex
     
    alexdesigns.com, Apr 16, 2008
    #3
  4. I've read that Macs need an Intel processor to even hope to edit AVCHD.
    Couldn't tell you which model, though.


    jaybee
     
    Jacques E. Bouchard, Apr 16, 2008
    #4
  5. PIXELFLIP

    Smarty Guest

    My last Powermac was their final and fastest dual processor G5 model,
    vintage 2006 or so. It was extremely slow compared to the Intel Dell I owned
    at the same time when doing editing on HDV. I am not at all surprised that
    AVCHD is out of the question.

    AVCHD requires at least a dual core Intel machine, and definitely prefers 4
    core. I would imagine that any of the current MacPros would be fine, but
    would be very careful if shopping for a MacMini or iMac. A laptop may also
    be too slow, particularly since they use slower bus and disk drive designs
    than Apple's desktop machines.

    Most likely, Apple uses the approach that you ingest the video into iMovie
    or FCP at slower than real-time while transcoding to their Apple
    Intermediate Codec. Rendering out to AVCHD output will also be very slow.
    The timeline editing should be pretty fast in this situation, but the AVCHD
    is not natively edited.


    Smarty
     
    Smarty, Apr 16, 2008
    #5
  6. PIXELFLIP

    kibumkey

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    When you import your AVCHD footage from Canon HD cameras into FCP for editing, the application actually do not edit in native HD videos. They transcode your videos into the Apple Intermediate Codec (AIC).
    You download your AVCHD files from your HD camcorders and convert to the intermediate codec, edit your footage, and then when you output edited files, FCP will reformat the videos into DV or HDV.
    I simply can't bear the fact that my 10+GB AVCHD footage (.MTS file extension) produced by my Canon Vixia HFS11 is going to be ten times bigger in FCP. So I quit the idea of editing AVCHD in FCP. Instead, I find a reliable, quality lossless converting tool for AVCHD files by a company named Aunsoft Studio.
    I use this Aunsoft AVCHD MTS/M2TS Converter because it converts Canon .MTS files to formats I can use, because it allows me to trim and crop my footage, because it offers high resolution output (I output to 1280x720) and because it deinterlaces (that last one is really important to me, and some of the competitors' software out there won't deinterlace).
     
    kibumkey, Jul 14, 2010
    #6
  7. PIXELFLIP

    mailber350

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    Final Cut Pro does not have native editing support for AVCHD footage. You can use the Log and Transfer window to transcode AVCHD footage to an Apple ProRes codec or the Apple Intermediate Codec during transfer. But the ProRes or AIC video files become even big, even 10 times than the original one. Final Cut Pro does not have native editing support for AVCHD footage. You can use the Log and Transfer window to transcode AVCHD footage to an Apple ProRes codec or the Apple Intermediate Codec during transfer. But the ProRes or AIC video files become even big, even 10 times than the original one.

    So it is a nice choice to transcode AVCHD video to other playable or editable video formats. The program I am using is Aunsoft MTS Converter for Mac which natively support AVCHD conversion and editing.
     
    mailber350, Nov 24, 2010
    #7
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