Canon vs Nikon - Which One

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by measekite, Aug 28, 2008.

  1. measekite

    measekite Guest

    We all know that the Digital Rebel XSi has an edge on the very fine
    Nikon D60.

    And the Nikon D300 (for a big wad of cash) has an edge on the Canon 40D.

    And nobody knows how th3 Nikon D700 will compare against the Canon
    5DMKII (or whatever they will call it)

    But how do you think the new Nikon D90 Will share out against the Canon 50D.

    And how will the new Canon 18-200 compare agaqinst Nikon 18-200.

    It should be interesting reading reviews in the upcoming months.
     
    measekite, Aug 28, 2008
    #1
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  2. measekite

    Ray Fischer Guest

    No we don't.
     
    Ray Fischer, Aug 28, 2008
    #2
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  3. measekite

    Doug Jewell Guest

    Put it this way - regardless of which brand you buy, it
    won't be long and then there will be a camera from the other
    brand which will be better, and you'll be tempted to say "i
    wish I bought xxxx instead". But then the brand you bought
    will have a new model and you'll say "I'm glad I bought xxxx".
    Then there's the Sony and Pentax offerings, which arguably
    offer better features for the money than the Nikon & Canon
    cameras.
    I'd suggest have a hands-on with as many cameras as you can
    and make your choice that way. At the end of the day, every
    DSLR on the market today is bloody good - the differences
    are splitting hairs. Use them and get a feel of which seems
    to be the nicest for you to use, and purchase according to that.
     
    Doug Jewell, Aug 28, 2008
    #3
  4. measekite

    Chris H Guest

    In message
    Yes. Very true. Canon was the lead one a while back now the impetus is
    with Nikon and in a year or so it will be back with Canon
    :) The trick is to realise both Canon and Nikon are equal but out of
    phase by 6/12 months. Besides what does it matter? BOTH Nikon and
    Canon will bring out a better replacement camera than the one you bought
    in the next 6-18 months anyway.

    When Nikon dropped the D70s I had did the D70s suddenly loose its
    specification or functionality? No. It is still as god as it was when it
    was launched. A damned good camera. It is just consumer envy/greed that
    wants you to "get the latest"
    Heretic!!! That is not true or God would not be using a Nikon! :)
    It does not matter how good (the specification of) the Camera is if you
    don't like the handling and the controls.
    This is true... except Nikon are the best which is why god uses them :)

    There are many people using Sony, Pentax Fuji etc who are very happy
    with the results and unless you are a pro who is spending lots of money
    needs all sorts of ancillary things almost any of the top makes will
    suffice.
     
    Chris H, Aug 28, 2008
    #4
  5. measekite

    Dave Guest

    On thing to consider is that 3rd partly lenses are always available in
    Canon and Nikon fit, but the range is much more limited for other makes
    of cameras. Hence that is a good practical reason to chose Canon or
    Nikon and not Pentax or some other lesser makes. If you buy a cheaper
    (i.e. not Nikon or Canon) you are more likely to want to buy cheaper
    (i.e. 3rd party) lenses.


    I always liked the concept of the Tamron Adaptal system, which was nice
    for me as I changed from Practica M42 to Nikon, but I've since sold all
    my Tamron lenses. But I think Tamron have abandoned that now, so if you
    buy a new lens you have to order to fit a Nikon, Canon or whatever.

    I've got Nikon myself, but as you say, both Nikon and Canon are very
    good, and clearly share the top spot for a while. Neither is
    consistently better than the other.

    If someone asked me what DSLR to get, I would also say choose a Nikon or
    Canon for the reason of lens availability. For a point and shoot, I
    would consider the cameras on their merits more, with less regard to who
    made them.
     
    Dave, Aug 28, 2008
    #5
  6. measekite

    Böwser Guest

    Well, for me, the old 43-86 push/pull zoom was the worst zoom I've ever
    used. Utterly horrible, and an incredibly popular lens from the slide rule
    days.
     
    Böwser, Aug 28, 2008
    #6
  7. measekite

    Böwser Guest

    It does?
    Yes, and it's more expensive, as well, as you say.
    Based on the quantity of rumors that existed prior to each release, the edge
    goes to the 5D II. (....sigh....)
    All I can tell right now is that the D90 is a little smaller. I think we
    need to see if Canon's 'gapless microlens' technology really can help. If it
    does, well... Let's wait for the test images.
    Both will suck. Nikon's may suck a little less since it's an AF-S lens, and
    the Canon uses a micromotor for focusing (geez, why?). But I believe
    suckitude will reign here.
     
    Böwser, Aug 28, 2008
    #7
  8. measekite

    Guest Guest

    there's a lot of pentax k-mount lenses out there.
    that doesn't work so well with electronic interfaces, although you'd
    think it would be easier. in any event, there's a nikon-canon adapter
    ring that translates the signals.
     
    Guest, Aug 28, 2008
    #8
  9. measekite

    Me Guest

    I had one of those 43-86 zooms - and stuck it in my basement about 25
    years ago. I found it a few years ago (and whether good luck or Nikon
    build or the fact that I have a dry basement - it was fungus free). I
    sold it online. The buyer was a Canon 20d owner using an f-mount
    adapter, keen to try to find some interesting alternatives to Canon
    glass. That might tell something - but perhaps not. The buyer gave me
    good feedback on the auction, but never sent me a copy of a picture
    taken with the lens.
     
    Me, Aug 28, 2008
    #9
  10. measekite

    Robert Coe Guest

    measekite wrote:
    : > We all know that the Digital Rebel XSi has an edge on the very fine
    : > Nikon D60.
    : >
    : > And the Nikon D300 (for a big wad of cash) has an edge on the Canon 40D.
    : >
    : > And nobody knows how th3 Nikon D700 will compare against the Canon
    : > 5DMKII (or whatever they will call it)
    : >
    : > But how do you think the new Nikon D90 Will share out against the Canon
    : > 50D.
    :
    : In your pocket you probably have a binary decision making tool.
    :
    : Flip it.
    :
    : Facetious? Yeah, maybe. But you should be looking to build a system
    : for the long term (20 years, say). So the body-du-jour is not of much
    : consequence.

    And when you've gone some distance down one road or the other, there's little
    point in looking back. My wife and I were Nikon users in the film era. But now
    we have two XTi bodies and six Canon-compatible lenses. So I've put myself on
    a waiting list for the 50D and may not even bother to read the details of the
    D90.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 30, 2008
    #10
  11. measekite

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    :
    : Doug Jewell wrote:
    : > measekite wrote:
    : >> We all know that the Digital Rebel XSi has an edge on the very fine
    : >> Nikon D60.
    : >>
    : >> And the Nikon D300 (for a big wad of cash) has an edge on the Canon 40D.
    : >>
    : >> And nobody knows how th3 Nikon D700 will compare against the Canon
    : >> 5DMKII (or whatever they will call it)
    : >>
    : >> But how do you think the new Nikon D90 Will share out against the
    : >> Canon 50D.
    : >>
    : >> And how will the new Canon 18-200 compare agaqinst Nikon 18-200.
    : >> It should be interesting reading reviews in the upcoming months.
    : > Put it this way - regardless of which brand you buy, it won't be long
    : > and then there will be a camera from the other brand which will be
    : > better, and you'll be tempted to say "i wish I bought xxxx instead".
    : > But then the brand you bought will have a new model and you'll say
    : > "I'm glad I bought xxxx".
    : > Then there's the Sony and Pentax offerings, which arguably offer
    : > better features for the money than the Nikon & Canon cameras.
    : > I'd suggest have a hands-on with as many cameras as you can and make
    : > your choice that way. At the end of the day, every DSLR on the market
    : > today is bloody good - the differences are splitting hairs. Use them
    : > and get a feel of which seems to be the nicest for you to use, and
    : > purchase according to that.
    :
    : Maybe but I think that Digital SLRs will mature to the same point as
    : their film predecessors. When that happen you will find much more time
    : between models and the newer cameras will settle for being evolutionary
    : instead of revolutionary.

    But only until technology advances bring about the next revolutionary change.
    In the case of film SLRs, the revolutionary change was the onset of digital.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 31, 2008
    #11
  12. measekite

    Robert Coe Guest

    > We all know that ...
    :
    : Frankly both Canon and Nikon are fine cameras. I have had both.
    :
    : Reviews are good, but almost all are intentionally or
    : unintentionally slanted.
    :
    : For anyone considering buying one, I suggest the following.
    :
    : 1. Decide what YOUR needs are. How are YOU going to use the camera?
    :
    : 2. Take a look to see what is currently on the market, that fits
    : those needs.
    :
    : 3. Research those the meet the needs and then get the top few models
    : into YOUR hands. Take some photos (use your own media) and compare
    : the results. Which is best? Which meet YOUR needs. Which felt
    : comfortable in YOUR hands? Which were easy and intuitive for YOU to
    : use.
    :
    : 4. It is not likely that you and I have the same needs, same size
    : hands, same experiences etc. So my opinion is not really worth much
    : once you get it down to the likely candidates.
    :
    : 5. Yea, what is important is the final product. But I may make MY
    : best product with a Canon and you may make YOUR best product with a
    : Nikon. So the on-line photos and opinions are not nearly as
    : important as YOUR personal real life opinions.

    I'd add that the decision criteria should include the cost, functionality, and
    ease of use of the manufacturer-supplied RAW processing software. Third-party
    alternatives can be expensive (Photoshop), tricky to learn (Gimp), or
    operationally clumsy (Gimp, Picasa). Canon's best product (Digital Photo
    Professional) is easy to use, more capable than one might expect, and free
    with any EOS camera. I know nothing abut Nikon's competing products, except
    that I've read that they charge upwards of $100 for their best one.

    Many of the 3rd-party products go beyond what the camera manufacturers
    provide, of course. But if you're reasonably careful with exposure and
    composition, you may find that you rarely need the added functionality. Hence
    the quality of the manufacturer-supplied software may well matter to you.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 31, 2008
    #12
  13. measekite

    Guest Guest

    photoshop is only expensive if one buys the full version, which is
    generally overkill for most people. photoshop elements uses the same
    adobe camera raw engine and is more than adequate for the average user.
     
    Guest, Aug 31, 2008
    #13
  14. measekite

    measekite Guest

    It does not support adjustment layers and standard layers. Without
    those features a photo editor is not very valuable.
     
    measekite, Sep 1, 2008
    #14
  15. measekite

    measekite Guest

    You forgot adjustment layers and standard layers.
     
    measekite, Sep 1, 2008
    #15
  16. measekite

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Complete nonsense. Few people need layers in order to make valuable
    adjustments to their photos.
     
    Ray Fischer, Sep 1, 2008
    #16
  17. measekite

    Guest Guest

    photoshop elements most definitely supports adjustment and standard
    layers.
     
    Guest, Sep 1, 2008
    #17
  18. measekite

    Guest Guest

    no he didn't; elements has both.
     
    Guest, Sep 1, 2008
    #18
  19. measekite

    tony cooper Guest

    I have both Photoshop 7.0 and Elements 5.0. Elements most definitely
    allows both adjustment layers and standard layers. What is lacks is
    Layer Mask and Curves. I'll use Elements for simple tweaks, and PS
    7.0 for more extensive modifications. Even some of the projects I do
    in PS 7.0 could be done in Elements 5.0, but I'm so used to working
    with PS 7.0 that I use it out of habit.

    I tried the evaluation download of Elements 6.0, but didn't see
    anything there that justified the expense of upgrading. Nothing wrong
    with it; just nothing I needed.
     
    tony cooper, Sep 1, 2008
    #19
  20. measekite

    measekite Guest

    To be able to go back and do a tweak or turn changes on and off without
    saving multiple versions layers are very important.
     
    measekite, Sep 3, 2008
    #20
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