Canon's RS-80n3 Remote switch

Discussion in 'Canon' started by ji, Dec 4, 2005.

  1. ji

    ji Guest

    Hi
    I have the Canon RS-80n3 which I am using for remote control on my 20D.
    However the cable is only 2 !/2 feet long. This is much to short for what I
    want to do. There is a cable extension cord available (Canon ET-1000N3) but
    the price is about $75.00. A lot more than I want to spend..
    What I'm thinking about doing is cutting the cable of the RS-80n3 in half
    and connecting the ends to connectors and then making up various lengths of
    extension cables with matching connectors. I hope I can get information as
    to the wire size of this remote switch before I cut it. I hope that they are
    not to small to work with. Also I would appreciate any information as what
    type of connectors are available.
    Thank you in advance.
    Jim
     
    ji, Dec 4, 2005
    #1
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  2. $What I'm thinking about doing is cutting the cable of the RS-80n3 in half
    $and connecting the ends to connectors and then making up various lengths of
    $extension cables with matching connectors.

    I've heard of other people doing the same, with success.

    $ Also I would appreciate any information as what
    $type of connectors are available.

    It's a three-conductor cable - two signal wires and one common
    wire - so pretty much any three-conductor connector would work.
    A 1/8" stereo connector, commonly used on headphones, should be
    cheap and reliable, and there are inexpensive headphone extension
    cords available which you could then use as extensions for your
    remote.[/QUOTE]
     
    Stephen M. Dunn, Dec 4, 2005
    #2
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  3. ji

    C J Southern Guest

    "ji" <jimpict.comcast.net> wrote in message

    $66.45 on www.amazon.com at the moment.

    From experience, some small/thin copper wire used in such cables can be
    coated some kind of varnish that needs to be removed before the wire can be
    soldered - the only problem is, the wire is so damned thin it's very hard to
    remove it without breaking the wire - and even when you do succeed you're
    left with a stress point where the rigid solder stops, and the copper cable
    resumes - not to mention an unsightly join.

    If it were me, I'd just cough up the $66.45. I'm reminded of the time I
    needed to buy a charger for my Nokia phone - the salesman gave me a choice
    of a genuine one for $49 or a clone for around $19. I went for the clone -
    in fact, I went for the clone 3 times before finally purchasing the genuine
    item for $49. Total cost = around $107. I'm sure there's a message there
    somewhere :(
     
    C J Southern, Dec 4, 2005
    #3
  4. ji

    ji Guest

    Hi
    I want to thank everyone for their reply.
    It was very much appreciated.
    Thanks again.
    Best wishes
    Jim
     
    ji, Dec 5, 2005
    #4
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