Can't decide: Canon G5 or Sony V1

Discussion in 'Sony' started by Lucas, Sep 12, 2003.

  1. Lucas

    Lucas Guest

    1. Sony V1 is two times faster than G5 according to dpreview.com (Total LAG
    =Auto Focus LAG + Shutter Release LAG)
    2.Sony has better movie (640x480 @ 16 fps)
    3.Sony is smaller and compact; lens has a "cover"

    but:

    1.Canon has two times better battery life
    2.Canon uses cheaper CF memory cards
    3.Canon has swivel LCD, remote control
    (because of first two> extra battery + Memory Stick = arround the same price
    as Canon's G5!)
     
    Lucas, Sep 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. Lucas

    EskWIRED Guest


    Sony has the worst customer support I have ever had the displeasure of
    experiencing. I will never again buy one of their products.
     
    EskWIRED, Sep 12, 2003
    #2
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  3. Lucas

    Lucas Guest

    Meaning what?
    When some malfunction appears, they send it to the service anyway.
    But I'm more interested in the overall quality of DSC V1.
    I'm not so happy with idea of buying digital photo camera from Sony either.
     
    Lucas, Sep 12, 2003
    #3
  4. Lucas

    Lucas Guest

    That was the first web page I looked...
    According to dpreview.com, V1 is the winner, but mostly because of the lower
    price.
    But as I said: "...extra battery + Memory Stick = arround the same price as
    Canon's G5!) "
     
    Lucas, Sep 12, 2003
    #4
  5. Lucas

    Jeff Guest

    I was making the same decision you were 1 month ago...

    I choose the G3. The primary reason I choose Canon over Sony was for
    the Canon flash units (550ex and 420ex). Sony just cannot compete with
    Canon's flash units. I feel that dpreview and others don't give enough
    attention to the fact that having the ability to use a powerful E-TTL
    external flash with your point and shoot really broadens the scope of
    your photo taking opportunities.

    example:
    (I use the older 380ex flash unit with my G3) You have a subject in a
    shady area (under a tree) with a 12noon sun beating down on the
    background.
    On the G3 you would use the focusing point to meter on the background
    and lock in the exposure with the AE lock button on the back of the
    camera. Then, put the focusing point on the subject and press the FE
    (flash exposure) lock button (also on the back of the camera). The
    flash fires a "pre-flash" to meter the flash exposure. Recompose, zoom
    in or out, and take the photo. The results are amazing. both the
    background and foreground are properly exposed. (I just sold my hand
    held flash meter on eBay)

    In full manual mode the less expensive 420ex flash can also be fully
    manual controlled by the camera. The flash power can be adjusted from
    1/8th power to full in 1/3rd stops.

    Also, Canon offers an "off camera shoe cord" for their flash units
    allowing full E-TTL flash metering with the flash unit actually
    tethered off the camera.

    The reason I choose the G3 over the G5 was price and reportedly bad
    "blue fringing" (at wide open) on the G5.


    -Jeff
     
    Jeff, Sep 12, 2003
    #5
  6. Lucas

    Jeff Guest

    While, on the G3 you can place the focusing point anywhere on the
    frame, I find it too slow press the directional buttons to do so.
    Therefore, I always leave the focusing point in the middle. If my
    subject is not in the middle this would cause me have to lock in the
    exposure(s) and recompose.

    BTW: I don't know about he G2, but on the G3 you can lock focus by
    pressing the shutter button half way down at anytime during your
    exposure; AE / FE locks and holding it half way down to retain the
    focus lock. Or, switch to manual focus.
    -Jeff
     
    Jeff, Sep 12, 2003
    #6
  7. Well, after a month with the Oly E10, a weekend with a borrowed G5 was an
    ergonomic nightmare. Coming from an SLR background it's no surprise that I
    can't stand compacts, and the menu system, while largely self explanatory,
    seems wholly unneccessary. My eye automatically goes to the viewfinder, and
    doesn't find what it expects. Manual focusing is dodgy to say the least.

    Results were nice, though. If it weren't such a large amount of money, i'd
    say this it what counts most. But it IS a lot of money, so you should handle
    the G5 and V1 and decide whether they are what you want.
     
    Martin Francis, Sep 13, 2003
    #7
  8. Lucas

    JK Guest

    Why not an Olympus C5050? i handled a V1 recently when a tourist
    asked me to take some photos of them with it. It is small and hard
    to hold. The lag from pressing the shutter until it captured the image
    seemed extremely long.
     
    JK, Sep 13, 2003
    #8
  9. Lucas

    JK Guest

    Perhaps the time writing the image to the card may have been long then?
    All I know is that it did take a long time until it was ready to take the next
    image.
     
    JK, Sep 14, 2003
    #9
  10. Lucas

    EskWIRED Guest

    No matter how good a Sony product might be, you have to consider customer
    service. I have never ever experienced the brain-dead, argumentative,
    waste-of-time service that Sony offers with ANY other company. I will
    never, ever buy another Sony product, despite the fact that they have
    wonderful engineers.
     
    EskWIRED, Sep 14, 2003
    #10
  11. Lucas

    Pedro Guest

    I have no problems just read the G5 manual, various modes for focus. Get G5
    bit pricey but should last a few years before Canon brig out a better
    version.
    Pedro
     
    Pedro, Sep 15, 2003
    #11
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