CD broke, I am learning...

Discussion in 'Photography' started by CandleRudd, Jun 29, 2008.

  1. CandleRudd

    CandleRudd Guest

    I copy my photos onto CDs. I take good care of them but one broke.
    The silver stuff on the top is being peeled by my CD rom. All my
    other CDs work fine so obviously its just the CD.
    The CD had a albino fawn on it, that I was saving for a contest. It
    also had a baby robins in a nest, macroed. Needless to say Im
    bumming.
    I posted to some other photographers and got some ideas of how to
    save better than CDs.
    So I am going to go shopping online soon and probably go with a USB
    chip of some sort. Im not sure im saying that right.
    Well just thought I would let you know, I lost alot of good
    photos. But am learning how to do things.
    Have a good night all, Judy

    http://postphotos.shutterpoint.com
     
    CandleRudd, Jun 29, 2008
    #1
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  2. CandleRudd

    Joel Guest

    Well, the good CD is the one with (1) scratch resistance (2) heavy
    protection (on the data side where you have it peeled).

    And better yet, DVD has better protection then CD because the DATA is in
    between 2 plastics (sandwiched), and again good scratch resistance is a way
    to go.

    CD
    _________
    ++++++++++

    DVD
     
    Joel, Jun 29, 2008
    #2
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  3. CandleRudd

    Mark Thomas Guest

    There are programs around that will help you read as much data as
    possible off the cd, if it is still being recognised and the damage is
    not too great. Also, you may find some drives will read more data than
    others, so it might be worth trying other CD readers.

    The moral of the story is to:

    1. Avoid cheap CD's. (and DVD's are generally better if you wish to use
    that type of media)
    2. Keep 2 copies on different media (even just different brands..)
    3. Periodically (say 6 monthly) check that both copies can be read (by
    copying the files, not just viewing the folder list).
    4. Move data to new media every couple of years.

    And then there are offsite backups, etc if you want to get really
    serious, but just sticking to 1 and 2 should prevent most disasters.
     
    Mark Thomas, Jun 29, 2008
    #3
  4. CandleRudd

    Wilson Guest

    I have a couple of questions for you. Did you save the originals or edited
    copies to a hard drive - either a separate drive or the one on your
    computer? If not how come? Did you upload these photographs to a
    commercial printer or lab? Did you upload these images to Shutterpoint?
    Did you have prints made anywhere? If so scan the prints if that's all you
    have. All of these places could have copies of your photos stored
    somewhere.

    Back photos up a minimum of two places.

    The best and most stable back up device I've found is a USB flash drive, or
    Thumb Drive, or Jump Drive, or whatever name they go by. Unlike a hard
    drive these devices have no moving parts. The price is getting right - you
    can find real bargains on multi gig drives if you check around. Here's what
    really sold me on them - I left one of the drives in my pants pocket and
    then I washed the pants. I found it (I check my pants pockets after washing
    rather than before) and tried it. It didn't work. Thinking it was dead I
    tossed it in the drawer. A few weeks later I saw it in the drawer, thought
    I would give it a last try before tossing it out and to my amazement all the
    photos were there just as if nothing had happened. So now I'm a true
    believer.

    On the less than positive side these drives are easy to lose, leave behind,
    get swiped, or whatever else you can imagine with something that small. Use
    a fine point Sharpie to get your name and number on the drive. There are
    some honest people out there who will call you if they find it.

    If you use one I would suggest you get the kind that will lock the images
    from being erased accidently. If you need to store confidential information
    get one that has security encryption.

    Thumb Drives rock. CD's suck.
     
    Wilson, Jun 29, 2008
    #4
  5. CandleRudd

    Anon Guest

    ....Until you come to read the disc 6 months later and realise the dye has
    failed and the disc is completely unreadable.
     
    Anon, Jun 29, 2008
    #5
  6. CandleRudd

    Frank Arthur Guest

    What brand & type of CD's did you use?
     
    Frank Arthur, Jun 29, 2008
    #6
  7. CandleRudd

    Joel Guest

    Well, if I can go back couple years to read the 6 months later then you
    may be right. Other than that I have been burning tens of thousands CDs and
    DVDs to know which is 6 monhs old. Else my years old still working.
     
    Joel, Jun 29, 2008
    #7
  8. CandleRudd

    Morton Guest

    SD cards are so cheap now, and they have a locking device, so my backups
    include leaving the images on the cards. With my 8 mp camera and best
    JPEG, I get almost 300 pictures on a 1 GB SD card.

    Regarding DC-Rs for photos, I use Delkin sealed gold-toned CD-R blanks,
    which cost less than $2.00 each.

    I have read that DVD-Rs are more prone to fade and become unreadable,
    than are good CD-Rs.

    Morton
     
    Morton, Jun 29, 2008
    #8
  9. CandleRudd

    Peter Guest

    After learning the hard way I now backup to a USB hard drive and DVD, for
    final products.
    Amazing how fast a terabyte fills up when I get lazy and don't keep up with
    culling the junk. On the plus side, a decent quality terabyte RAID is about
    $400, with prices falling.

    You can go even further, but how important are your images and how anal are
    you about backups.

    Just my thoughts
     
    Peter, Jun 30, 2008
    #9
  10. CandleRudd

    Joel Guest

    It would cost me a fortune to backup to either hard drive or raid, cuz I
    may have more than 12-13+K of DVDs. And it would cost me another big time
    and fortune if the DVD only last for 6 months )or even few years).
     
    Joel, Jun 30, 2008
    #10
  11. CandleRudd

    CandleRudd Guest

    Thanks for the advice. Have a great day. Judy
     
    CandleRudd, Jun 30, 2008
    #11
  12. CandleRudd

    CandleRudd Guest

    I used a cheap brand I am sure. I had my boyfriend pick them up,
    Walmart specials.. Live and learn. Have a good one, Judy
     
    CandleRudd, Jun 30, 2008
    #12
  13. CandleRudd

    Peter Guest


    Personal choice. What are your images worth.
    Do you want to cull, risk, or spend.
    Only you can make that decision.
     
    Peter, Jun 30, 2008
    #13
  14. CandleRudd

    Joel Guest

    My images worth the satisfy of my clients and memory. You are right that
    only you can make your decision, but it's usually nice to know the real
    story.
     
    Joel, Jul 1, 2008
    #14
  15. CandleRudd

    Peter Guest


    One can only make an informed decision when we know the whole story.
     
    Peter, Jul 1, 2008
    #15
  16. CandleRudd

    Scott W Guest

    I am having a hard time getting my mind around this, 12K DVD?
    Say a DVD holds about 500 raw images, you are now talking about 6
    million raw photos, do you have anywhere near that number?

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Jul 1, 2008
    #16
  17. CandleRudd

    Joel Guest

    Thanks for telling the whole story <bg>
     
    Joel, Jul 1, 2008
    #17
  18. CandleRudd

    Joel Guest

    Hmmm it sounds like you may need another mind for other thing(s) besides
    image <bg>
     
    Joel, Jul 1, 2008
    #18
  19. CandleRudd

    krishnananda Guest

    Scott, you mean you _don't_ have 48 TB of images? Wow, and here I
    thought my shooting was becoming a bit excessive. Maybe that explains
    why my wife left me -- I just put in a new rack of SAN RAIDs and another
    UltraSPARC database server to keep the catalogs updated where the bed
    used to be...
     
    krishnananda, Jul 2, 2008
    #19
  20. CandleRudd

    Joel Guest

    Here, I have been shooting digital for around a decade (started with
    Logitech grayscale camera) but the resolution was very small until later
    when I upgraded to DSLR when the file size gets much larger.

    I can't keep track of the number of photos I have taken, duped, turn to
    video presentations etc.. but I am guessing around more/less 2-3 millions
    (?). But those may not need more than few hundreds of DVDs (I always keep a
    copy of the originals, retouches, and several copies for clients). Just
    incase Scott may ask me why give clients more than one ... well, because I
    am a nice guy who think that I know and have all the tool to copy, print the
    DVD and the DVD is very cheap, so I give them several for their relatives or
    friends (like the bride & broom side etc.), or about 4 DVDs average.

    And the rest of other DVDs I use for other thing(s).
     
    Joel, Jul 2, 2008
    #20
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