Chopped OVF for Sony A350

Discussion in 'Sony' started by Focus, May 28, 2008.

  1. Focus

    Focus Guest

    Sometime ago I read about the possibility to put a Nikon eye magnifying
    glass in place of the Sony eyecup.
    Yesterday I went to a store and tried the Nikon DK21M (M is important,
    because without it, it's just an empty cup). It fits like a glove and the
    view is very much improved, no if's, buts or maybe's about that.
    BUT! I did like the original big eye cup of the Sony. So I started to chop
    around and now I finished. Mind the fact that the whole thing stands a
    little off from the camera, but for me that's not important.
    I have a much better view and control.

    Here's a picture of the two parts before I "trashed" them:
    http://photos-of-portugal.com/Eye1.JPG

    You have to take the rubber ring away from the Nikon, even they tell you it
    can't be done. RIGHT!

    Then you also have to do some trimming on the Sony cup to make it fit.
    To keep the eye starter to work, you also need to trim a bit at the bottom
    of the Nikon: just take some away, try if it work, take some away again,
    etc.
    http://photos-of-portugal.com/Eye2.JPG

    There you go: perfect OVF with a 17% bigger view. Believe me: that's much!
    Any questions: just ask.
     
    Focus, May 28, 2008
    #1
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  2. Focus

    k Guest

    | Sometime ago I read about the possibility to put a Nikon eye magnifying
    | glass in place of the Sony eyecup.
    | Yesterday I went to a store and tried the Nikon DK21M (M is important,
    | because without it, it's just an empty cup). It fits like a glove and the
    | view is very much improved, no if's, buts or maybe's about that.
    | BUT! I did like the original big eye cup of the Sony. So I started to chop
    | around and now I finished. Mind the fact that the whole thing stands a
    | little off from the camera, but for me that's not important.
    | I have a much better view and control.
    |
    | Here's a picture of the two parts before I "trashed" them:
    | http://photos-of-portugal.com/Eye1.JPG
    |
    | You have to take the rubber ring away from the Nikon, even they tell you
    it
    | can't be done. RIGHT!
    |
    | Then you also have to do some trimming on the Sony cup to make it fit.
    | To keep the eye starter to work, you also need to trim a bit at the bottom
    | of the Nikon: just take some away, try if it work, take some away again,
    | etc.
    | http://photos-of-portugal.com/Eye2.JPG
    |
    | There you go: perfect OVF with a 17% bigger view. Believe me: that's much!
    | Any questions: just ask.

    nice work :)
     
    k, May 28, 2008
    #2
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  3. Focus

    ASAAR Guest

    Nice job. But as it will let in additional light from the rear,
    putting the exposure off by as much as 0.7EV, it would have been
    more useful on the Canon DSLR you recently returned . . .




    :)
     
    ASAAR, May 28, 2008
    #3
  4. Focus

    Focus Guest

    LOL.
    But additional? If anything it lets less light come in..
     
    Focus, May 28, 2008
    #4
  5. And on the A350 you can always just switch to live view, viewfinder
    blind comes over and you get 1200-zone evaluative metering read from the
    focus screen - with alarming accuracy.

    David
     
    David Kilpatrick, May 28, 2008
    #5
  6. Focus

    Focus Guest

    Can you elaborate on that? I don't quite understand.
    Do you mean the metering in liveview is different than with the OVF?

    And how is it alarming?
     
    Focus, May 28, 2008
    #6
  7. Focus

    Alan Browne Guest

    I admire your handiwork. However, this is the nice thing with the
    higher end Minolta's (Sony's): the viewfinder is brighter and has higher
    contrast than the lower end models like the -350.

    This mainly due to a prism instead of a mirror box.

    Cheers,
    Alan.
     
    Alan Browne, May 29, 2008
    #7
  8. Yes, in evaulative (matrix) mode only. In centre weighted and spot, you
    get the normal system. In matrix mode, the CCD video sensor does the
    metering instead, and of course you never get overexposure (it's like a
    bridge camera metering in that respect) and there is therefore no need
    for the camera to underexpose slightly, which the A350 tends to do with
    regular metering just to make best use of dynamic range (9.2 stops at
    ISO 100 according to Anders Uschold in the BJP yesterday).

    With Live View Matrix metering, you get 1200 colour sensitive points and
    the live view image perfectly matches the final output in terms of the
    live histogram, as well. with LV metering there really is no need ever
    to think about bracketing, it's like using the KM A2 (which I still use
    occasionally).

    David


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    David Kilpatrick, May 29, 2008
    #8

  9. Of course you can also fit the magnifier to the higher end cameras - it
    then produces a superb size of viewing image. I have the Olympus ME-53
    magnifier which is 1.2X instead of the 1.17X for the Nikon, but it need
    a lot more work to make it fit.

    David


    --
    Icon Publications Ltd, Maxwell Place, Maxwell Lane, Kelso TD5 7BB
    Company Registered in England No 2122711. Registered Office 12 Exchange
    St, Retford, Notts DN22 6BL
    VAT Reg No GB458101463
    Trading as Icon Publications Ltd, Photoworld Club and Troubadour.uk.com
    www.iconpublications.com - www.troubadour.uk.com - www.f2photo.co.uk -
    www.photoclubalpha.com - www.minoltaclub.co.uk
    Tel +44 1573 226032
     
    David Kilpatrick, May 29, 2008
    #9
  10. Focus

    Focus Guest

    Thanks for clearing that up. Now, of course: how does it differ from say,
    Canon and Nikon LV? I assume they don't have that CCD video sensor, because
    the mirror is locked up, right?
     
    Focus, May 29, 2008
    #10
  11. They should take the exposure from the main sensor, though auto-gain can
    influence that and I am unsure whether for example the Canon 450D really
    does - as every shot always returns you to AF/mirror action.

    I'm pretty sure the Nikon D300 and D3 get their exposure reading direct
    from the sensor.

    David

    --
    Icon Publications Ltd, Maxwell Place, Maxwell Lane, Kelso TD5 7BB
    Company Registered in England No 2122711. Registered Office 12 Exchange
    St, Retford, Notts DN22 6BL
    VAT Reg No GB458101463
    Trading as Icon Publications Ltd, Photoworld Club and Troubadour.uk.com
    www.iconpublications.com - www.troubadour.uk.com - www.f2photo.co.uk -
    www.photoclubalpha.com - www.minoltaclub.co.uk
    Tel +44 1573 226032
     
    David Kilpatrick, May 29, 2008
    #11
  12. But surely even such comprehensive metering can only produce an
    accurate exposure in cases where the image dynamic range is within the
    dynamic range of the camera. Otherwise it's only going to get it right
    if its algorithm takes the same decisions about what is the most
    important detail to catch in this particular image as you do, e.g.,
    blow out the highlights to catch all the shadow detail, or dump shadow
    detail to preserve highlight detail, or only preserve highlight detail
    up to the point of specular refletions, and so on.

    I would have thought in those cases it could only get the exposure
    "right" by good luck. So you would either do it it carefully manually
    by examining the historgram, blown zebra stripes, etc., or do
    bracketing to cover the range of uncertainty.
     
    Chris Malcolm, May 30, 2008
    #12
  13. Focus

    Mr.T Guest


    Surely if the contrast range is greater than the camera can handle, and you
    want both shadow detail and highlight detail, you have no option than to
    take multiple exposures and use some form of HDR (auto or manual)

    Otherwise it MUST be up to the photographer to choose what he wants to
    sacrifice. Of course you can let the camera do it if you don't give a rats
    what it chooses.

    MrT.
     
    Mr.T, May 30, 2008
    #13
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