Color Settings - Photoshop

Discussion in 'Photography' started by tony cooper, Oct 2, 2012.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    At last night's camera club meeting, there was a discussion about
    color space choices: sRGB IEC61966-2.1, Adobe RGB, or ProPhoto RGB.
    (Apple RGB was not discussed)

    Which do you use and why?
     
    tony cooper, Oct 2, 2012
    #1
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  2. tony cooper

    Alan Browne Guest

    Camera:
    Either Adobe or sRGB for capture as you can re-interpret from raw. sRGB
    is fine most of the time. If there is really a wide range of color/tone
    one might find banding / block up with Adobe RGB - but I doubt it.

    Preparing photos for the internet:
    sRGB for display (internet) - de facto standard

    Preparing photos for printing:
    sRGB for print prep. This works best with my printer (Epson 3800).
    But for print prep I set the editor (CS3) to view the CMYK.

    The color range of Adobe RGB is supposed to be larger (but a little less
    fine in gradation). Most people can't tell I 'spect.
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 2, 2012
    #2
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  3. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    ProPhoto RGB, because it has the widest color gamut. I know the screen
    and the printer are incapable of seeing the entire gamut, but I think it
    give the most consistent interpolations. The larger gamut gives me more
    control over subtleties.
     
    PeterN, Oct 2, 2012
    #3
  4. tony cooper

    Savageduck Guest

    ....but there is no subtlety in any of your "abstracts". ;-)
     
    Savageduck, Oct 2, 2012
    #4
  5. tony cooper

    otter Guest

    Lightroom default is ProPhoto RGB which is what I use. There are some
    technical reasons, too.
     
    otter, Oct 3, 2012
    #5
  6. For what?

    Normally I convert RAW files to ProphotoRGB (a "big" color space) in
    16-bits-per-channel, work them there, and then compress the results to
    sRGB 8-bit jpegs for web display, or send them direct to printer drivers
    for printing (8-bit printer drivers mostly; I do check gamut against
    printer profiles when I'm aiming for print).

    It's useful to be able to work with things a lot "bigger" and more
    detailed than your final result when doing serious work, same way the
    10+ stops of negative film was still useful on the way to a 5-stop
    print. You get to rearrange the data without losing it.
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Oct 3, 2012
    #6
  7. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    PeterN, Oct 3, 2012
    #7
  8. tony cooper

    Savageduck Guest

    Savageduck, Oct 3, 2012
    #8
  9. Hmmm. Then there's no reason at all for monitors to be Adobe
    RGB capable --- and even more no reason for Adobe RGB capable
    monitors to have an sRGB mode.

    Hmmm ... well, *I* can see the overly neon colours on such a
    monitor when not colour managed, even without a side by side
    comparison.

    True, the slightly larger steps in Adobe RGB are IMHO not visible.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Oct 10, 2012
    #9
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