Consensus on the new Olympus E-3 performance

Discussion in 'Olympus' started by RichA, Dec 2, 2007.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Lags every other camera in it's class. Specifically, the Nikon D300,
    the Canon 40D and the Sony A700. It's only shining point appears to
    be it's fast AF, claimed to be the fastest and this seems true, at
    least when not using Live View. IMO, Olympus has gone as far as it
    can with the 4/3rds sized sensor. I predict a price of under $1300
    U.S. on Ebay from outfits like Cameta before Feb. 08.
     
    RichA, Dec 2, 2007
    #1
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  2. RichA

    Pete D Guest


    HA HA HA, they are not in the same class as the E3, they are all way above
    the E3.
     
    Pete D, Dec 2, 2007
    #2
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  3. RichA

    RichA Guest

    I wouldn't go so far as to say that, sensor performance is higher from
    them, but for all other considerations, the E-3 holds it's own, but
    then sensor performance ultimately is the number 1 attribute for most
    users.
     
    RichA, Dec 2, 2007
    #3
  4. RichA

    Pete D Guest

    Well photography is about the collection of the best quality photons is it
    not???
     
    Pete D, Dec 2, 2007
    #4
  5. RichA

    RichA Guest

    I guess it comes down to what is "good enough?" But what if someone
    determined that (for e.g.) Canon's 40D represents the very best of the
    crop sensors. Does this mean that if photography is about collecting
    the best quality photons, only the Canon is acceptable and people must
    not only sell their Olympus, but their Nikons, Pentax's, etc, as well?
    Olympus has apparently managed to squeeze 1 stop more DR out of the
    this sensor than the other 10 meg Olympus sensors, which is a "feat"
    of sorts. Better sensor design. But because of pixel size, noise
    control of the highest level still eludes them, thus, the rest of the
    pack are better in that sense. Also, the Nikons, Canons, etc., seem
    to be able to turn out slightly sharper images, though some Olympus
    supporters are arguing that this is not the case, that the reviewers
    are wrong. I think what is that either someone is kidding themselves,
    or the differences in sharpness between the cameras is subtle. If all
    testing was uniform, methods and tools, we likely wouldn't have any
    ambiguity about this kind of thing.
     
    RichA, Dec 3, 2007
    #5
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