Converting 8mm film to Video

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by Geary Morton, Feb 5, 2007.

  1. Geary Morton

    Geary Morton Guest

    I want to convert about 1000' of standard 8mm movie film to digital
    video. DVD is okay but would prefer to get it into a less compressed
    format, either on tape or a hard drive.

    Any suggestions on a company that's doing a good job with this?

    Thanks!

    Geary
     
    Geary Morton, Feb 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. Geary Morton

    Mike Kujbida Guest


    http://www.moviestuff.tv/transfers.html
    Highly recommended - here and elsewhere.

    Mike
     
    Mike Kujbida, Feb 5, 2007
    #2
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  3. Geary Morton

    Phil M Guest

    To telecine Regular 8mm in with a professional Rank Cintel Flying Spot
    Scanner (the one that Hollywood uses to digitize their motion pictures
    for DVD authoring) using a wetgate transfer, scene to scene DaVinci
    color timing to uncompressed AVI or MOV, you don't have many options:

    The only company in North America who has a regular8 gate for this
    beast is Posthouse:

    www.posthouse.com

    I used their regular 8 and s8 services and their prices are extremely
    reasonable. In a wetgate transfer, the scratches of your 8mm are
    greatly reduced. The Cintel's Xenon lamp reproduces faithfully the
    color on the film. Furthermore, no cameras are involved. The film is
    scanned frame by frame. You simply get the best of the best.

    Next in quality, you have the Video Workpriner by
    http://www.moviestuff.tv/8mm_telecine.html
    Their quality is very good. (no wetgate transfer is possible, and a
    camera pickup device is used to "capture" the film)

    Further down in quality you have the so called Elmo 8mm projectors.
    They are essentially 5-bladed modified film chain projectors with a
    built-in single CCD cameras. Quality is mediocre at best. (most "pro"
    shops use this method...)

    And way further down the list is project your movie to a screen and
    sync the shutter of a Canon GL-2 to capture the screen with no
    flicker, and hope for the best...
     
    Phil M, Feb 8, 2007
    #3
  4. "one of the types Hollywood uses to digitize..." etc etc

    ;-)
    --
     
    Martin Heffels, Feb 8, 2007
    #4
  5. Geary Morton

    Phil M Guest

    "one of the types Hollywood uses to digitize..." etc etc

    I stand corrected. I just oversimplified because the Rank is the most
    popular.

    If I have to name every single Telecine that Hollywood and IMAX
    uses/used then one wouldn't know from where to start: Rank URSA,
    Cintel C-Reality, BTS FLH-1000, FDL-60, Philips Spirit DataCine,
    Thomson Shadow, ITK Millenium, Sony Vialta, and all the other Line
    Array CCD Telecines, and then we have Anamorphic, Cinemascope 55
    telecine. Oh God. But to my knowledge, the only Flying Spot Scanner
    with a custom made REGULAR 8 / S8 gate is found at PostHouse.

    Other facilities, such as FSFT, use the Thomson Shadow Flying Spot
    Scanner for SUPER8. http://www.fsft.com/ (no regular8)

    .... ok, ok, some would argue that in the 70's Kodak made an 8mm
    desktop Flying Spot Scanner for TV stations. In my humble opinion, it
    would be much more easier to find a 2" VTR in working order than a
    Kodak 8mm CRT scanner even in a museum...
     
    Phil M, Feb 9, 2007
    #5
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