Cropping or not cropping part of a subject

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Celcius, Aug 4, 2007.

  1. Celcius

    Celcius Guest

    Hi!

    I've had an argument about photographing a subject and not including his
    feet.
    Photographing a subject to the waist seems OK. Even head and shoulders.
    However, I'm told that if the subject is standing, one should also include
    his feet. *I feel that there is no such rule in photography* (there are
    rules such as the rule of thirds, etc, but not this one). If I choose to
    crop below the knees, I feel it's OK. Also, if the subject is sitting on a
    bench, I don't feel there is any rule that states his feet should be
    included. I might just include down to the waist and crop out the rest.
    Please help.

    Thanks,

    Marcel
     
    Celcius, Aug 4, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Celcius

    Joel Guest

    There is no solid rule, and nobody needs to abyet the rule_of_thirds or
    whatever rule. Photography is just like all another arts, they all have
    general guide-line for learning and developing, but you do not have to do
    exactly what Picaso, Michael Angelo, or any famous artist.

    Believe it or not! cropping is one of the most advances of photography,
    you do not have to follow the rule_of_thirds but the best way to hide the
    weak point and draw attention to the focus point (where you want people to
    focus) to tell your story. It can be rule_of_thirds and it may not, it can
    be color, sharpness, strong contrast, or some combination.

    Also, it depends on the style; head-shot, 1/2 or full body, portraiture,
    landscape, animal, human, model's, single, group-shot etc. they may and may
    not follow some specific rule.

    - Same with male/female human, each has different guide-line, different
    cropping style depending on different situation.

    - Same with human vs animal, human has 2 feet when animal has 4. Animal can
    look cute with feet above its head when human ain't (except some circus
    performance or yoga etc..)

    So, depending on the cropping style some time feed can be an important
    part of the photo, but sometime it ain't. I don't go by any specific rule
    (but rule of enjoyment) unless someone points a gun to my head <bg>
     
    Joel, Aug 4, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Celcius

    Celcius Guest

    There is no solid rule, and nobody needs to abyet the rule_of_thirds or
    whatever rule. Photography is just like all another arts, they all have
    general guide-line for learning and developing, but you do not have to do
    exactly what Picaso, Michael Angelo, or any famous artist.

    Believe it or not! cropping is one of the most advances of photography,
    you do not have to follow the rule_of_thirds but the best way to hide the
    weak point and draw attention to the focus point (where you want people to
    focus) to tell your story. It can be rule_of_thirds and it may not, it can
    be color, sharpness, strong contrast, or some combination.

    Also, it depends on the style; head-shot, 1/2 or full body, portraiture,
    landscape, animal, human, model's, single, group-shot etc. they may and may
    not follow some specific rule.

    - Same with male/female human, each has different guide-line, different
    cropping style depending on different situation.

    - Same with human vs animal, human has 2 feet when animal has 4. Animal can
    look cute with feet above its head when human ain't (except some circus
    performance or yoga etc..)

    So, depending on the cropping style some time feed can be an important
    part of the photo, but sometime it ain't. I don't go by any specific rule
    (but rule of enjoyment) unless someone points a gun to my head <bg>


    Thank you Joel.
    I guess it's all a question of balance and what I would call "story
    telling", in other words, the eye of the beholder should focus on what was
    meant to be either the main subject or the main point of the photograph.
    However isn't there in photography some guidelines re what constitutes a
    great photo? I went to the National Gallery last Saturday to see an
    exhibition of Renoir. Although Renoir is a renowned painter and most of the
    paintings displayed were fine, I found a number of paintings that I wouln't
    have kept myself, had they been photographs. Lighting was of course great
    but the painting itself was drab: a sea scape. Period. No ship, no mast, no
    one, no bird, nothing but waves. It didn't even provide a mood!
    The question that arises in such a situation is: What's the point? Even
    great paintings possess certain basic characteristics: composition and
    rendition (choice of colours, brush strokes, effects of light, etc...).
    Marcel
     
    Celcius, Aug 4, 2007
    #3
  4. Celcius

    Joel Guest

    I happen to love painting myself, and there are so many different type of
    paints (or I would better say many different styles of arts). Some styles
    we will have to: stare, look, learn, lean, and sometime we may have to
    depend on the TITLE to be able to figure out what message behind the mess.

    IOW, besides some regular outstanding painting, photograph someone creates
    or captures a great moment of the image. There are so many different types
    of painting (I know very little and can only be able to enjoy very few) that
    we have to know how to look to be able to see beyond what it appears to
    normal view.

    I think you may have run into some kind of 3-D images years ago some
    newspaper used to print on Sunday (and there are books too) that you haveto
    look at the whole picture in many different ways so you can be able to see
    the HIDDEN IMAGE. Same with art, there are several type of painting you
    have to learn how to view, right angle, right mood or luck etc. to be able
    to see either single or multiple hidden images (like a story) in a whole
    image (can either be a regular image or a BIG MESS)

    Hahaha NO, I don't see the value of millions of dollars painting, and
    probably because I can only see a small low-rez quality of it, or don't have
    hours to exam the brush stroke of the original. Or I am not qualified to
    enjoy those masterpieces., but I feel lucky to be able to enjoy few.
     
    Joel, Aug 4, 2007
    #4
  5. Celcius

    Stan Beck Guest

    There are no rules - just guidelines. If you don't follow them, you won't
    go to jail, but you might look silly.

    The thing about cropping is how the result looks. Cropping just above the
    ankles, or just below the knees, can create the illusion of an amputee.
    Depends upon who is looking. For this reason, there are guidelines that
    help minimize these illusions. Do whatever you want.


    --
    In the US everything is made in China except Chinese food - it's made in the
    US.

    Stan Beck > From New Orleans to Brandon MS
    To reply, remove 101 from address.
    ***
     
    Stan Beck, Aug 4, 2007
    #5
  6. Celcius

    Frank Arthur Guest

    Buy a camera with the highest megapixel size you can afford so that
    you will still have a decent resolution when you crop your images.
     
    Frank Arthur, Aug 4, 2007
    #6
  7. Celcius

    Stan Beck Guest

    I think you might have missed the point of the original post.

    --
    In the US everything is made in China except Chinese food - it's made in the
    US.

    Stan Beck > From New Orleans to Brandon MS
    To reply, remove 101 from address.
    ***
     
    Stan Beck, Aug 4, 2007
    #7
  8. Celcius

    Celcius Guest


    Sorry Fred,

    When I talk about cropping, I don't mean "post cropping" (Photoshop, etc.)
    I mean what I choose to photograph and things I don't include in the
    picture.

    Marcel
     
    Celcius, Aug 5, 2007
    #8
  9. Celcius

    Celcius Guest

    Sorry Stan,
    I answered directly without realising it.
    As I said:
    This makes sense.
    Marcel
     
    Celcius, Aug 5, 2007
    #9
  10. Celcius

    Joel Guest

    Well, sometime we can have quite afew of fun with the rule_of_thirds,
    because when photographer has nothing else to debate they even use the
    rule_of_thirds on head-shot. Something like (just for fun of course).

    1. Eyes = upper 1/3

    2. Chin = 2/3

    3. Chest etc..

    Now, if you take a head-shot of "Jay Leno" then his chin will break the
    rule_of_third, or head-shot of "Dolly Parton" then her chest may not be
    right for the rule_of_third etc.. <bg>
     
    Joel, Aug 5, 2007
    #10
  11. Celcius

    Pat Guest

    There are rules and they are definitely designed to be followed until
    you get to the point that you know when you can/can't break/bend the
    rules. So if you are asking this question, you probably aren't ready
    to start breaking rules.

    The biggest rule of cropping is to make it interesting but not so
    interesting as to make it look stupid.

    The second rule of cropping is that it should enhance the photo.
    Often that means to simplify it by getting rid of clutter that
    distracts from the subject.

    The third rule of cropping is that "abnormal sizes/shapes" only work
    if you want to invest in a matte cutter. Otherwise, stick to normal
    sizes.

    The fourth rule of cropping is don't drop AT a joint. Is is an
    unpleasant look.

    The fifth rule of cropping is that there are only four rules.
     
    Pat, Aug 5, 2007
    #11
  12. Celcius

    Paul Furman Guest

    LOL thanks for the humor and a good cropping rule list.
     
    Paul Furman, Aug 10, 2007
    #12
  13. Celcius

    Celcius Guest

    Paul,
    Please... you call this humour? You must be easily entertained ;-)))))
    Take care,
    Marcel
     
    Celcius, Aug 10, 2007
    #13
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.