D200 bad for left-eyed people

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Roy Smith, Nov 26, 2007.

  1. Roy Smith

    Roy Smith Guest

    Having now owned my D200 for almost a year, I finally figured out one of
    the bizarre little twists of the camera. The focus area selection has
    always been a bit of a mystery to me. I'd set what I want, and some time
    later, it would be on some other setting, and I'd have no clue what I did
    to change it.

    Today, I finally got it.

    I'm left eyed. When I hold the camera with the viewfinder to my left eye,
    the 4-way selector button and the tip of my nose occupy the same point in
    space. It would seem that all this time, I've been pushing the button with
    my nose and not noticing it.

    I'm not sure what I'm going to do to fix this problem, but understanding
    what has been going on certainly removes some of the mystery. A nose job
    is not in the cards, but I'll figure something out :)
     
    Roy Smith, Nov 26, 2007
    #1
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  2. Roy Smith

    Paul Furman Guest

    I'm right eyed & have the same problem with the auto exposure area knob
    getting moved to spot meter mode. I assume it's from moving in & out of
    the bag as my D70 had a similar issue with (I forget which) knob.

    Duct tape?

    :)
     
    Paul Furman, Nov 26, 2007
    #2
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  3. Roy Smith

    Don Wiss Guest

    The fix is simple. You can rotate the outer dial and lock the setting.

    Don <www.donwiss.com/pictures/> (e-mail link at page bottoms).
     
    Don Wiss, Nov 26, 2007
    #3
  4. Roy Smith

    Pat Guest

    Which settings on his nose is he locking?
     
    Pat, Nov 26, 2007
    #4
  5. Roy Smith

    Eric Miller Guest


    Here's an idea; use your other eye.

    Eric Miller
    www.dyesscreek.com
     
    Eric Miller, Nov 26, 2007
    #5
  6. Roy Smith

    Doug Payne Guest

    That's much easier said than done.
     
    Doug Payne, Nov 26, 2007
    #6
  7. Roy Smith

    Chris Savage Guest

    I have no right macula, therefore have only ever operated my D200 left
    eyed. I've never had this problem, but then I've always turned the lock
    on.
     
    Chris Savage, Nov 26, 2007
    #7
  8. Roy Smith

    RichA Guest

    Thanks to the croaking old film users, we are stuck with DSLRs that
    look and act like film cameras. Innovation in design (like perhaps
    designing a DSLR that would allow you to keep a free eye open to the
    world), will likely never appear.
     
    RichA, Nov 26, 2007
    #8

  9. this is really funny

    you must have a short nose or mine is long. It must have something to
    do with genetics and a complex lineage.

    I had the same problem but figured it out fairly quickly.

    Sorry but I could not help it a bit of single malt has had its effect
     
    william kossack, Nov 27, 2007
    #9
  10. Were there not some film SLRs that allowed you to do that? Mine
    didn't, so I often used a tripod when it wasn't necessary for shutter
    speed, just because it let me look at the scene with the naked eye
    without disturbing the carefully selected camera position. Being able
    to use both eyes while looking through my R1's viewfinder is one of
    its features I rather like. I've met some DSLR users who use vertical
    format more often than they otherwise would, just to be able to use
    both eyes in that fashion.
     
    Chris Malcolm, Nov 27, 2007
    #10
  11. Roy Smith

    RichA Guest

    Like I said, design is being stifled by convention, unfortunately.
     
    RichA, Nov 27, 2007
    #11
  12. Roy Smith

    Alan Guest

    I had two problems with the f5. One was focus area and the other was
    the shutter release on the bottom right kept going off. I think I
    disabled both.
     
    Alan, Nov 27, 2007
    #12
  13. Roy Smith

    Chris Savage Guest

    WTF are you talking about? How does this follow from anything I said?
    Like I said, I never had the problem, I use the lock. What did you think I
    said?
    Take more water with it and learn your limits.
     
    Chris Savage, Nov 27, 2007
    #13
  14. Roy Smith

    Mike Guest

    What you have to do is use your second finger to press the shutter release. This leaves your first finger free and,
    with a bit of practice, you will find it easy to position it behind the body of the camera - at which point you can
    apply the tip of it to the side of your nose. A relatively gentle sideways thrust should push the tip of the nose out
    over the LCD screen and away from the selector buttons. Initially, practice this manouvre in private until it becomes
    natural as it is possible, in the excitement of getting a good shot, to apply too much pressure and risk a nose bleed.

    Mike
     
    Mike, Nov 28, 2007
    #14
  15. Roy Smith

    Eric Miller Guest

    They both require about the same amount of effort in my experience.

    Eric Miller
    www.dyesscreek.com
     
    Eric Miller, Dec 3, 2007
    #15
  16. Everyone is different. I couldn't possibly use my right eye for
    anything like that. including Archery.
     
    Dr Hfuhruhurr, Dec 3, 2007
    #16
  17. Roy Smith

    Eric Miller Guest

    Eric Miller, Dec 3, 2007
    #17
  18. Roy Smith

    Robert Coe Guest

    : Eric Miller wrote:
    : > Roy Smith wrote:
    : >> Having now owned my D200 for almost a year, I finally figured out one
    : >> of the bizarre little twists of the camera. The focus area selection
    : >> has always been a bit of a mystery to me. I'd set what I want, and
    : >> some time later, it would be on some other setting, and I'd have no
    : >> clue what I did to change it.
    : >>
    : >> Today, I finally got it.
    : >>
    : >> I'm left eyed. When I hold the camera with the viewfinder to my left
    : >> eye, the 4-way selector button and the tip of my nose occupy the same
    : >> point in space. It would seem that all this time, I've been pushing
    : >> the button with my nose and not noticing it.
    : >>
    : >> I'm not sure what I'm going to do to fix this problem, but
    : >> understanding what has been going on certainly removes some of the
    : >> mystery. A nose job is not in the cards, but I'll figure something
    : >> out :)
    : >
    : >
    : > Here's an idea; use your other eye.
    :
    : That's much easier said than done.

    Well, that's as it may be. But sometimes it's just necessary to acquire a
    modicum of ambidexterity. After all, many right-handed people play the French
    horn.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 3, 2007
    #18
  19. Roy Smith

    Robert Coe Guest

    : Thanks to the croaking old film users, we are stuck with DSLRs that
    : look and act like film cameras. Innovation in design (like perhaps
    : designing a DSLR that would allow you to keep a free eye open to the
    : world), will likely never appear.

    You don't say. My XTi lets you do it easily.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 3, 2007
    #19
  20. Roy Smith

    Robert Coe Guest

    : > Thanks to the croaking old film users, we are stuck with DSLRs that
    : > look and act like film cameras. Innovation in design (like perhaps
    : > designing a DSLR that would allow you to keep a free eye open to
    : > the world), will likely never appear.
    :
    : Were there not some film SLRs that allowed you to do that?

    That would be tricky on a film SLR, but virtually all 35mm rangefinder cameras
    did. IIRC, the rangefinder of my Nikon SP showed the scene at full size, the
    same as your free eye.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 3, 2007
    #20
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