D70 on-camera sharpening vs. Photoshop sharpening

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by john, Jul 19, 2004.

  1. john

    john Guest

    Hi folks,

    I've had the D70 for a little while now, and I'm starting to explore more of
    the features. One of these is the "Sharper" setting in the "Optimize Image"
    menu.

    Before I launch into a mini-research project (ie. trial-and-error), is there
    any obvious reason why I would or wouldn't use this feature, as opposed to
    the shooting with the default settings and then using the "Sharpen" feature
    in Photoshop Elements?

    Thanks!
    J
     
    john, Jul 19, 2004
    #1
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  2. First, you probably shouldn't use Sharpen in Elements. Photoshop's
    Sharpen filter has a fixed effect, and it's not ideal for most
    circumstances. It's generally too extreme. You should be using Unsharp
    Mask instead. Unsharp Mask has 3 settings that control its operation,
    and it takes a bit of time to learn to use well, but with much more
    control you can get much better results.

    Having said that, you shouldn't use in-camera sharpening because

    1) sharpening is usually best done *after* all other processing, not
    before

    2) Unsharp Mask is better than any fixed sharpening scheme.

    Dave
     
    Dave Martindale, Jul 19, 2004
    #2
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  3. john

    B.A.S. Guest

    Not true on a D70 if you shoot NEF. You can remove the sharpening later
    if desired in Nikon Capture (and probably in PS too? I don't have a
    modern version of PS and haven't tried its NEF capabilities yet).

    I shoot NEF + JPG, with medium sharpening in-camera. For quick and dirty
    viewing and test (4x6) prints with no postprocessing, I use the JPG's.
    It's nice having them 'pre-sharpened' for evaluation.

    For keeper images, and especially those I will be making large prints
    from, I go into Nikon Capture with the NEF image file, remove the
    sharpening, and edit and tweak as appropriate. Then I sharpen as my last
    step, with Unsharp Mask.

    Just my 2 cents,

    B.A.S.

    P.S. This workflow may change if and when I ever get around to buying PS CS.
     
    B.A.S., Jul 19, 2004
    #3
  4. john

    JPS Guest

    In message <cdfhr9$n05$>,
    How about equalizers working in the frequency domain?

    Kai's Power Tools has one in an old version, but the highest frequency
    is 1 pixel and the bands are all powers of two; not very flexible.
    --
     
    JPS, Jul 20, 2004
    #4
  5. e.g. Sharpening before noise suppression will enhance noise.
    Sharpening before downsizing will increase aliasing. Sharpening before
    upsizing will increase blockiness.
    e.g. A simple Laplacian kernel sharpening will sharpen noise, an USM
    threshold allows to avoid some of that. A simple sharpening has a
    fixed support, USM has variable support.

    Bart
     
    Bart van der Wolf, Jul 20, 2004
    #5
  6. john

    andrew29 Guest

    I mostly agree, but there is one thing to be said for sharpening
    before JPEG encoding: it doesn't accentuate JPEG artefacts, which
    later sharpening does.

    Andrew.
     
    andrew29, Jul 23, 2004
    #6
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