Dektol formula?

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Larry, Aug 12, 2008.

  1. Larry

    Larry Guest

    Does anyone have a formula for Kodak Dektol. thanks once again in
    advance

    Larry Kriese
     
    Larry, Aug 12, 2008
    #1
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  2. Larry

    jch Guest

    _____
    Larry,

    From Photo-Lab Index 1977 issue, Page 429, Kodak D72 (approximately the
    some as Dektol) stock solution:
    Water 500 ml
    Metol 3 g
    Sodium sulphite (desic) 45 g
    Hydroquinone 12 g
    Sodium carbonate (mono hydr) 80 g
    Potassium bromide 2 g
    Water to make 1 liter

    For paper development, dilute 1:1. Develop for 1 min at 20C. I
    standardised my time to 2 minutes at 20C when using RC style paper.

    Others may have additional info regarding this developer.

    / John
     
    jch, Aug 12, 2008
    #2
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  3. Larry

    jch Guest

    _____
    Larry,

    Tiny correction. First amount of water should be hot at 50C. Order of
    chemicals to dissolve is important.

    From Photo-Lab Index 1977 issue, Page 429, Kodak D72 (approximately the
    same as Dektol) stock solution:
    Water at 50C 500 ml
    Metol 3 g
    Sodium sulphite (desic) 45 g
    Hydroquinone 12 g
    Sodium carbonate (mono hydr) 80 g
    Potassium bromide 2 g
    Water to make 1 liter

    Dissolve chemicals in order given.

    For paper development, dilute 1:1 or 1:2. Develop for 1 min at 20C. I
    standardised my time to 2 minutes at 20C when using RC style paper.

    Others may have additional info regarding this developer.

    / John
     
    jch, Aug 13, 2008
    #3
  4. Didn't Kodak sell a Tri-Chem Pack, which was Dektol, stop bath and
    fixer powders?

    I have not used one in about 40 years, but I seem to vagely remember there
    being different dilution for film. I may be wrong and can't find anything
    by searching for it except people selling old ones and unanswered
    questions.

    Kodak's web page was no help. Searching for "tri chem pack" found nothing
    and I was offered a suggestion to search for "try chem pack" and "tri-chem
    pack" gave me nothing and a suggestion for "gedrukt pack". Don't they
    have a historical list of products anywhere on their web site?


    Geoff.
     
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Aug 13, 2008
    #4
  5. Richard Knoppow wrote (in part):
    The use of more concentrated dilutions of D72 and Dektol can be understood
    if you refer to Dr. Henry's tests of dilutions. He found that if you diluted
    more than 1+2, the Dmax was reduced (although the lower densities were less
    affected). At a dilution of 1+15 he lost an entire stop of density. This is
    shown on page 92 of the second edition of his book, "Controls in Black and
    White Photography." It is my guess that in the old days, photographic paper
    did not reach these densities (2.4) so the fall off was less noticeable.
     
    Jean-David Beyer, Aug 13, 2008
    #5
  6. Larry

    Ken Hart1 Guest

    I remember the TriChem packages. I don't know the time frame they were sold,
    but I used them in the late 1960's-early '70's. The foil package had enough
    chems for one roll of film or several prints. They were also sold in
    "beginner's" kits, usually a film tank, three trays, a contact print frame,
    a red light bulb, twenty five sheets of 4x5 paper and a tri-chem pack.
    Thinking about how little B&W processing I do these days, if they were still
    available, I'd probabl buy them!
    I've processed film in Dektol, usually for newspaper work years ago. As I
    recall, my time was about 1/3 that of D-76 (1:1) with a 1:2 dilution. It
    worked well because the grain wasn't an issue and the newspaper wanted high
    contrast.
     
    Ken Hart1, Aug 13, 2008
    #6
  7. Yes; I've always wondered why people are after such information as this.
    I can see wanting formulas for pyro developers and other exotic stuff,
    but Dektol? Just go out and buy it. Do people actually mix their own?


    --
    "Wikipedia ... it reminds me ... of dogs barking idiotically through
    endless nights. It is so bad that a sort of grandeur creeps into it.
    It drags itself out of the dark abyss of pish, and crawls insanely up
    the topmost pinnacle of posh. It is rumble and bumble. It is flap and
    doodle. It is balder and dash."

    - With apologies to H. L. Mencken
     
    David Nebenzahl, Aug 14, 2008
    #7
  8. Larry

    Ken Hart1 Guest

    snip
    I have a Kodak Autographic with instruction book. In the back of the book
    are various darkroom items, among them a picture of the tablet type
    developer. It looks sort of like a roll of LifeSavers.
     
    Ken Hart1, Aug 14, 2008
    #8
  9. Maybe for you. Outside of the U.S., and maybe Canada, it is not easy to find.
    Besides the fact that black and white developing products and film have all
    but disapeared from stores (a sad comment, not the start of a debate),
    on this side of the world Kodak products were never popular.

    They were available, and Kodak color film and digital cameras are common,
    but there was a lot more Ilford, Agfa and Tetnal than Kodak.

    You can't mail order it. Since 9/11 it can't be shipped air mail, and
    international surface mail has all but disapeared.

    The only way I could get my hands on anything less than a container load
    would be to convince someone moving here to stuff a few cans in their
    container of household goods. Now that the boat portion of international
    shipping has almost doubled in price, that's almost impossible.

    I am lucky in a way because there is an art school here that considers itself
    "world class", and insists that their students learn film photgraphy. This
    supports a single camera store's ability to stock things like 120 film,
    Holga's (at $75 each for the one without flash), and a few bottles
    of liquid developing chemicals.

    The day they drop film photography completely, there will be no supplies
    sold in the entire country. :-(

    Geoff.
     
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Aug 14, 2008
    #9
  10. Possibly if they live in places where you cannot buy Dektol. But in such
    places, I would wonder if you could get all the components. Sulphite might
    be OK, as might the carbonate. But the paramethylaminosulphate and the
    hydroquinone?
     
    Jean-David Beyer, Aug 14, 2008
    #10
  11. Sulphite can be bought at a pool supply. From my experience, several
    people have heard of one near here, but no one actually knows where it
    is, what it is called, and how it is listed (if it is listed at all)
    in the phone book.

    Carbonate is not available here as washing soda, but someone who makes
    soap gave me the name of a company that sells sodium hydroxide and may
    sell carbonate too.

    Paramethylaminosulphate and hydroquinone, would have to be imported in
    someone's luggage, but you might be able to get it if it can be sent
    via airmail and the customs people don't get upset. My guess is that
    by the time you paid for postage, taxes, customs clearing, etc, it
    would cost over $100 for the equivalent of 1 liter of developer.

    As an aside, I once tried to make "tylenol" developer, and gave up because
    of the price. Although the world's largest manufacturer of generic drugs
    is located here, the price of them over the counter is too high to make it
    worth it. Due to socialized medicine, I can get a bottle of 50 with a
    prescription for about $3-$4, but enough to make developer out of
    would be too expensive. There is no equivalent of Sam's Club or Costco
    selling bottles of 500. :-(

    Someday when I have time to spend, I may experiment with a coffee developer.
    The ingredients are easy to find and if I give up, I can drink the
    unused main ingredient.


    Geoff.
     
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Aug 14, 2008
    #11
  12. So where in the world besides Israel can one *not* readily obtain Dektol
    (or Ilford's equivalent)? Geoff Mendelson's travails notwithstanding,
    I'm pretty sure it's easily available in most places in the U.S., in
    Yurp, and in the rest of the UK.


    --
    "Wikipedia ... it reminds me ... of dogs barking idiotically through
    endless nights. It is so bad that a sort of grandeur creeps into it.
    It drags itself out of the dark abyss of pish, and crawls insanely up
    the topmost pinnacle of posh. It is rumble and bumble. It is flap and
    doodle. It is balder and dash."

    - With apologies to H. L. Mencken
     
    David Nebenzahl, Aug 14, 2008
    #12
  13. Whereas the places you buy the chemicals to mix it are how far away?


    --
    "In 1964 Barry Goldwater declared: 'Elect me president, and I
    will bomb the cities of Vietnam, defoliate the jungles, herd the
    population into concentration camps and turn the country into a
    wasteland.' But Lyndon Johnson said: 'No! No! No! Don't you dare do
    that. Let ME do it.'"

    - Characterization (paraphrased) of the 1964 Goldwater/Johnson
    presidential race by Professor Irwin Corey, "The World's Foremost
    Authority".
     
    David Nebenzahl, Aug 15, 2008
    #13
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