[Depth of Field of Dreams]. If You Build It, I Will Buy It.

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Guest, Nov 6, 2008.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    With all this HD mullarkey about to explode on the [stills] camera scene, it
    is now a good time to dig out my Minolta Flashmeter to make me look like a
    Director of Photography [cinematographer] when I am out and about, measuring
    lighting ratios and working out the shutter angles @24fps. Anyway it got me
    thinking, wouldn't it be great in this wireless world to have a wireless
    meter. You take an incident reading from the subject, press send, the
    settings get sent to the camera and your all set. Even better, build a
    screen into the meter and make it a remote control for the camera and you
    can start taking pictures or 'filming'. One extra step would be to have a
    transceiver that can measure distance information and make adjustments to
    the focus, that way you could put the unit in the pocket of the subject and
    the camera will adjust focus by locking on to the unit. Great for steadycam
    shots while running down a street at 2.8 on 70mm lens. Have I gone too far?
    If any of this actually appears as I have described I will sue. Unless they
    already exist in which case where can I buy one.
     
    Guest, Nov 6, 2008
    #1
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  2. Guest

    Guest Guest


    Really? Why did you do that if it's not necessary? I think it would be very
    useful in certain circumstances.
     
    Guest, Nov 6, 2008
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Paul Furman Guest

    Ha, that never occurred to me. My first SLR, around 1982, had a meter so
    I never toyed with an incident meter. I do understand the concept...
    that you meter the light coming down rather than what's bouncing off the
    subject and it's an interesting idea to just set the exposure to some
    subjective ambient brightness but I'm so accustomed to exposing for the
    highlights and darkening later if needed... and at that point it's
    purely an aesthetic call, nothing scientific.

    Cinematographers see things from a different perspective than still
    shooters though, maybe there's something I'm missing but I don't get
    what's wrong with an in-camera meter approach unless you are doing some
    scientific documentation.

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Nov 7, 2008
    #3
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest


    Incident meters are used in mainly even lighting, or controlled lighting,
    studios, movies, copying. They are not so useful in the great outdoors where
    there can me a large contrast range. Spot metering is accurate as long as
    you are familiar with tones and where they should be placed, otherwise you
    will tend to get under and over exposure, that is why old meters used the
    average system which works pretty well in the majority of cases.
     
    Guest, Nov 7, 2008
    #4
  5. Guest

    slide Guest

    Even better - we can build the meter INTO the camera!!!
     
    slide, Nov 7, 2008
    #5
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest


    That's a great idea, what would also be a great idea (in my Canon) is to
    have a focus distance indicator in the viewfinder, it helps when measuring
    manual flash. BTW, how go you take a reading from studio flash with the in
    built camera meter?
     
    Guest, Nov 7, 2008
    #6
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest


    This is interesting for Canon 5D Cinematographers,
    http://www.redrockmicro.com/redrock_dslr.html
     
    Guest, Nov 7, 2008
    #7
  8. Guest

    Paul Furman Guest

    Ha, and people think DSLR geeks are geeks.
    No clue but I'd like to learn.

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Nov 8, 2008
    #8
  9. Guest

    Frank Arthur Guest

    I built an automatic digital camera that has treads like a tank. I can
    send it out to scenic spots and find ideal picture subjects while I
    sleep in bed. When it returns it downloads the images to my computer,
    automatically corrects the work in Photoshop, neatly compiles Albums
    and even views and enjoys them for hours at a time- all while I am
    still asleep. Well, enough now, I have to get to bed.
     
    Frank Arthur, Nov 8, 2008
    #9
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest


    He he. Good one.
     
    Guest, Nov 8, 2008
    #10
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