Difference between Nikon's D and G lenses?

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by Kulvinder Singh Matharu, Apr 3, 2005.

  1. I'm a Canon user, but a friend of mine recently got a Nikon SLR
    camera (body only). He want to get some lenses and the manual
    recommends D or G lenses. So the question, what's the difference
    between the D and G lenses?

    TIA!

    --
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu
    Website : www.metalvortex.com
    Contact : www.metalvortex.com/form/form.htm

    "It ain't Coca Cola, it's rice", Straight to Hell - The Clash
     
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu, Apr 3, 2005
    #1
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  2. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    newsW Guest

    hi,

    http://www.nikonlinks.com/equipment_lenses_general.htm

    particulary:
    anti-G petition (photo.net discussion)
    http://www.photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=004ei4
     
    newsW, Apr 3, 2005
    #2
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  3. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    JR Guest

    D lenses have a chip in them that send the focus distance to the camera
    so if you are using the flash it knows how far away your subject is and
    takes that into consideration for flash photos.

    G lenses are D lenses without the aperture ring so you have to set the
    aperture on the camera. Not a big deal because you do that with D
    lenses in certain modes anyway. The only thing is that you cannot use
    the G lenses on older Nikon film cameras because they dont have the
    second command dial...

    At one time G lenses were usually cheaper and made less durable, but now
    G lenses can range from cheap plastic slow lenses to the fastest, best
    optical lenses with VR (vibration reduction) and AFS (Silent wave
    focusing motor)...

    JR
     
    JR, Apr 3, 2005
    #3
  4. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    ian lincoln Guest

    G lenses tend to be the cheaper ones. They don't have an aperture ring
    either its all controlled via the camera. Both D and G are autofocus.
     
    ian lincoln, Apr 3, 2005
    #4
  5. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Sander Vesik Guest

    The G lens don't have a manual aperture ring, so the lens can only
    be used on cameras that set the aperture electronicly from the
    camera body. Unless he has a manual or a really old body, both
    should work fine (there are no other differences between D and G lens).
     
    Sander Vesik, Apr 4, 2005
    #5
  6. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Sander Vesik Guest

    You mean like the 200mm f/2 IF ED VR AF-S G ? And yes, its a "G" lens with
    no aperture ring.
     
    Sander Vesik, Apr 4, 2005
    #6
  7. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Matt White Guest

    Sometimes I wonder if they're going to run out of letters someday, and will
    then have add Cyrillic letters or something.

    - Matt
     
    Matt White, Apr 4, 2005
    #7
  8. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Sander Vesik Guest

    Well, it contains most of the present-day useful technology designators
    (if -> internal focusing, ed -> premium low disp glass, vr - vibration
    reduction, AF-S -> motor in lens, G -> AF-D lens w/o aperture ring). They
    also have RF, AF, AF-D, DC (defocus control), PC (perspective control)
    & DX and some historical ones. The growth rate isn't really too bad, I
    don't expect a new one for at least two-three years.
     
    Sander Vesik, Apr 5, 2005
    #8
  9. [snip] Thanks everyone. Got a better handle on this now.
    But what about this G lens :
    http://www.camerahobby.com/Review-70-200mmVR.htm

    --
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu
    Website : www.metalvortex.com
    Contact : www.metalvortex.com/form/form.htm

    "It ain't Coca Cola, it's rice", Straight to Hell - The Clash
     
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu, Apr 5, 2005
    #9
  10. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    newsW Guest

    hi,

    AFS Nikkor 70 - 200 mm f/2.8 G ED-IF VR: Full Review
    http://www.naturfotograf.com/AFS70-200VR_rev00.html

    Nikon AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED-IF Test Review
    http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/70200vr.htm
     
    newsW, Apr 5, 2005
    #10
  11. The G lens does not have an aperture ring so they are not backward
    compatible with older cameras. In addition the cheaper lenses in the Nikon
    line tend to be G series lenses.

    I have both types and for general photography the less expensive models
    of the G lens can be a great deal, slow but great deal.
     
    Korbin Dallas, Apr 6, 2005
    #11
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