Diffue Glow Filter on a Separate Layer?

Discussion in 'Photoshop' started by ItsLouieD, Aug 18, 2011.

  1. ItsLouieD

    ItsLouieD Guest

    Hey all. Not sure if this is possible... I'm on Photoshop CS5 64-bit.

    I have a flat image that I want to apply a diffuse glow to. However, I
    would like to have the original image on one layer and the output of
    the filter on a separate layer, as opposed to all on the same layer.

    I realize this may not be completely possible so here's an alternate
    that could work but I'm not sure how to do. Could I take the original
    image and "subtract" it from the new image with the diffuse glow?

    The ultimate goal is to be able to display the original image on a
    bottom layer and then applying the diffuse glow on a top layer without
    redrawing the entire image.

    Thanks for the help!
     
    ItsLouieD, Aug 18, 2011
    #1
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  2. ItsLouieD

    Paul Burdett Guest

    Why not sinply duplicate the background layer and apply the filter to that?
    I guess that's not what you are asking? Are you wanting to have a separate
    layer with just the diffuse glow showing minus the original image? If so,
    then I'm not sure if that's possible?

    Paul
     
    Paul Burdett, Aug 18, 2011
    #2
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  3. What should work is the following: copy the image to a new layer and apply
    the filter. Set the blending mode to 'Difference'. Ctrl-klik on the RGB
    icon in the channels palette to select the result by luminosity. Create a
    mask from that. Set the blending mode back to normal. You should now have a
    layer with a mask that masks out anything that isn't different from the
    underlying image.
     
    Johan W. Elzenga, Aug 18, 2011
    #3
  4. ItsLouieD

    Paul Burdett Guest

    Thanks Johan...now at least I know how to do that!

    Paul
     
    Paul Burdett, Aug 18, 2011
    #4
  5. ItsLouieD

    Carrie Guest

    This is what I thought. I've used a filter on a duplicate layer, but seems
    like I had to get rid of some of the background on the filter layer. Like
    "extract" background first. So, the subject (if there is one) was on the
    new layer with part or all of the background gone. I duplicate the layer to
    put effects on anyway. If you just have one layer you can't use the fx
    effects on them anyway. I have CS3 and that's what I've found, using that.
    Seems like we'd have to see or know more details about the picture you
    are using and what (in the picure) you want to put the diffuse glow on.
    Wouldn't there have to be SOMETHING to put the diffuse glow on? Not just a
    top layer.
    I probably should have opened PS and tried this myself first, just
    going by memory and what you seem to be asking.
     
    Carrie, Aug 18, 2011
    #5
  6. ItsLouieD

    ItsLouieD Guest

    I want the effect over the entire image because it gives it a washed
    out, flared out look that accentuates the light sources. Think of some
    of the scenes in minority report for example.

    I alsomwant the effect to live on a separate layer that I can toggle
    on and off, but I want to be able to export the effect alone as a
    raster and the image alone as a raster, separately.

    Basically I want a top layer with transparency that houses the effect
    alone, and the image as background underneath. I want to be able to
    export the two and recreate the scene dynamically by drawing the
    effects layer with transparency over the background art.

    I think what Johan wrote fits the bill best. Haven't had the chance to
    try it yet. Thanks!
     
    ItsLouieD, Aug 19, 2011
    #6
  7. ItsLouieD

    Carrie Guest

    I want the effect over the entire image because it gives it a washed
    out, flared out look that accentuates the light sources. Think of some
    of the scenes in minority report for example.

    I alsomwant the effect to live on a separate layer that I can toggle
    on and off, but I want to be able to export the effect alone as a
    raster and the image alone as a raster, separately.

    Basically I want a top layer with transparency that houses the effect
    alone, and the image as background underneath. I want to be able to
    export the two and recreate the scene dynamically by drawing the
    effects layer with transparency over the background art.

    I think what Johan wrote fits the bill best. Haven't had the chance to
    try it yet. Thanks!

    Oh, I see what you mean now. Not sure if effects can be put on a
    transparent layer on their own. But I'm still a newbie at this (doing
    tutorials and trying to figure things out). Its an interesting idea though,
    and if it can't be done it SHOULD be.
    I was thinking some kind adjustment layer or action. (I have an action that
    I got elsewhere that puts gold sparkles over the image- then you can lighten
    this after. I havent' found anything too useful to do with it yet, but
    apparently the effect is on a layer) I'm still kind of new at all that. And
    so much one can do, in so many different ways. Don't like to pass up a
    chance to learn something new- or try to.
     
    Carrie, Aug 19, 2011
    #7
  8. ItsLouieD

    Savageduck Guest

    From what you are saying it seems your best approach is to work on a
    duplicate layer, or a duplicate layer converted to a "smart object".
    That way your background layer will always be intact and unadjusted.

    I would suggest getting Matt Kloskowski's book "Layers" from Kelby
    Training, or Amazon.
     
    Savageduck, Aug 19, 2011
    #8
  9. ItsLouieD

    Joel Guest

    Well, the chance to teach yourself a new trick is

    1. Learning to understand the basic commands, then you understand how thing
    work in general

    2. Studying (or just a quick look if you know Photoshop well enough) a
    plug-in, action etc. to see what Photoshop can do to learn the IDEA then you
    have it.

    IOW, if you know Photoshop well enough, knowing few basic commands/tricks
    then you DO NOT want to spend too much time learning the step-by-step *but*
    to adapt the IDEA then use your *already* learned skill(s) to match it.

    *If* you waste your time learning Step-by-Step then you may only be able
    to learn ONE thing, but if you *adapt* the IDEA then you may be able to do
    and come up with hundreds or thousands differrent things/ideas.

    Example, if you have learned how to add a HAIR to the head, then you
    should adapt the idea/technique to add a leave to a tree, a rock to a
    mountain, a star to the sky etc.. Similar to fading or whatever, if you know
    how Layer, Masking etc. work on forground/background then you should be able
    to adapt the same technique to it.

    I don't do Golden Sparkles but I have created a BRUSH with my name, logo,
    signature etc. to add to some photo. And you too can create your personal
    brush with your own name, signature, or a SPARKLES. Then with a sparkle
    brush you can spray all over any image with many different spraying styles
    (setting)
     
    Joel, Aug 19, 2011
    #9
  10. ItsLouieD

    Carrie Guest

    That's a good idea, about learning the basics, and applying them. The idea
    of creating your own signature brush, too.
     
    Carrie, Aug 19, 2011
    #10
  11. Wow. Never considered that. It's been masks until now.

    Thanks for that.
     
    John J Stafford, Aug 20, 2011
    #11
  12. I think this question has been well answered!

    May I suggest an experiment that works for some images (not all).

    http://www.digoliardi.net/jk.jpg

    The point of the photo shown here is the selected glow or out-of-focus
    done without touching up.'Natural' you might say. And some images are
    ambiguous as in the case above where his glasses (foreground) are sharp,
    as is much of the VW Bug in the middle-ground, with the rest soft.

    It's a reverse of one particular sharpening method.

    Copy original layer
    Desaturate it
    Invert it
    Change layer mode to overlay
    Filter- other - high pass. Use slider to get desired effect

    (Working from old memory - hope I got all the steps there. No photoshop
    on this computer.)
     
    John J Stafford, Aug 20, 2011
    #12
  13. ItsLouieD

    Carrie Guest

    You can't do anything with an original background layer anyway, unless
    you copy it first. Or rename it.
     
    Carrie, Aug 21, 2011
    #13
  14. ItsLouieD

    Savageduck Guest

    Savageduck, Aug 22, 2011
    #14
  15. ItsLouieD

    Carrie Guest

    That's nice! I love learning new things. And I'm just getting into using
    the layer modes, like overlay, etc.
    I learned one something like this one time, that ends up with it looking
    like a sketch or ink drawing (depending on how you do it). Same up to
    overlay, but use color dodge,then gaussian Blur (till it looks like what you
    want)
    Just tried it (what I mean) it's desatuate>copy>invert>color
    dodge>gaussian blur.
    I know what you mean about getting the steps right and all there, I had to
    do it, to make sure.
    Now I want to try what you said.
    There are so many ways to do so much.
     
    Carrie, Aug 23, 2011
    #15
  16. ItsLouieD

    Carrie Guest

    Carrie, Aug 23, 2011
    #16
  17. ItsLouieD

    Carrie Guest

    I tried this last night, was late and I was aiming at going to bed.
    Didn't seem to work, it ended up with the photo turning back to color, but
    odd colors. Maybe I didn't do it right, will try again today.
     
    Carrie, Aug 23, 2011
    #17
  18. I have to say that I tried it (on PS Elements 5) and it produced an
    effect that I didn't expect! Amazing what you learn here....


    I've played with all the blending modes in the past and found only a few
    that seem useful. Is there a tutorial anywhere that shows when they are
    useful.

    Mike
     
    Michael J Davis, Aug 24, 2011
    #18
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