Digicam - extreme depth of field

Discussion in 'Australia Photography' started by o{O}o, Jan 17, 2005.

  1. o{O}o

    o{O}o Guest

    o{O}o, Jan 17, 2005
    #1
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  2. o{O}o

    stef Guest

    Any lens capable of around f/22 (or smaller) could manage that large DOF....
    it's nothing special really.
     
    stef, Jan 17, 2005
    #2
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  3. o{O}o

    [BnH] Guest

    I don't see why not.
    What's your budget ?

    You can buy a Sinar digital back and stop it at f/64 if you have the budget.
    or just use some prosumer cam with small sensor and open it at f/11 and
    you'll get that.
    But do note .. you'll need a very bright sky :)

    =bob=
     
    [BnH], Jan 17, 2005
    #3
  4. o{O}o

    Dave E Guest

    ....or a reasonable tripod (even a beanbag + solid leaning point).

    Cheers,
    Dave :)
     
    Dave E, Jan 17, 2005
    #4
  5. o{O}o

    k Guest

    | "[BnH]" <b18[at]ii[dot]net> wrote in message
    | | > I don't see why not.
    | > What's your budget ?
    | >
    | > You can buy a Sinar digital back and stop it at f/64 if you have the
    | budget.
    | > or just use some prosumer cam with small sensor and open it at f/11 and
    | > you'll get that.
    | > But do note .. you'll need a very bright sky :)
    |
    | ...or a reasonable tripod (even a beanbag + solid leaning point).
    |


    re the sinar.. it's not the same thing as using a 6mm lens at f 16! ;-) **

    lets see - a 'standard' focal length lens on a 1/2 frame camera focussed at
    4m has a dof from 1.4m to infinity at f8, for a 4x5 that near focus when set
    on f64 is 1.5m and the circles of confusion are still going to be be pretty
    large AND the refraction will *kill* any sharpness at f64.

    ** don't forget that the dof for a short focal length lens is damned large
    compared longer lenses


    k
     
    k, Jan 17, 2005
    #5
  6. o{O}o

    Rob Guest


    Now lets bring in Scheimflug and see what happens.

    r
     
    Rob, Jan 18, 2005
    #6
  7. o{O}o

    Scott Coutts Guest

    What about that Panavision lens? I cant remember the lens or the name of
    the guy who designed it. That guy who did the nature docos and makes his
    own lenses. He does those shots where you have a macro photo of an ant
    or a snail or something, with all the buildings etc in the background
    all in focus too.
     
    Scott Coutts, Jan 18, 2005
    #7
  8. o{O}o

    Rob Guest

    Its not a Panavision lens thats a brand name I think. Must see if I can
    get a look at his pattern (which is in Canberra) to see how that concept
    works.

    Did you also know if you attach a Nikon PK13 extension tube to a
    Nikon 60mm f2.8 Micro lens it has two in focus positions. Someone may
    like to answer why thats so.
     
    Rob, Jan 18, 2005
    #8
  9. o{O}o

    k Guest

    |
    | Now lets bring in Scheimflug and see what happens.


    yup, that shifts your plane of focus - handy if you want such a thing but
    that's all, similarly that kewl 24mm Minolta lens with the variable focal
    plane that flexed from convex to concave but it changes little, short focal
    length lenses have deeper DOF's than longer ones.

    crikey, if i could fit a 4mm to my 8x10 and get full coverage the question
    arises - would I ? ;-)

    k
     
    k, Jan 18, 2005
    #9
  10. o{O}o

    Scott Coutts Guest

    Yes, Panavision is the company that makes the lens now for commercial
    use. I realise that it's not the lens type... but if you want to use it,
    you have to get it from Panavision. I remembere what it's called now,
    and after a bit of googling on the name, you can read about it here. THe
    guy's name is Jim Frazier.

    Panavision Frazier Lens System
    http://www.panavisionnewyork.com/equipment/optics_35mm/
    hehe no I didnt know that. Sounds interesting.
     
    Scott Coutts, Jan 18, 2005
    #10
  11. o{O}o

    o{O}o Guest

    I found the comments from the photographer
    about this extreme depth of field digital photo;
    http://www.ezshots.com/members/tripods/images/tripods-8.jpg

    from Kelly Flanigan, jan 10, 2003; 01:01 a.m.
    "5.5mm focal length lens; stopped down in bright sunlight.
    Hex is about 7/16" across the flats; Fence at Left is
    100 + feet away. Olympus digital camera is from Walmart.
    White car is 20+ feet away. Orange tripod leg is only a
    few inches from camera."

    I dont understand some things about her comments, like
    "5.5mm focal length lens; stopped down in bright sunlight"
    and "Hex is about 7/16" across the flats".
    I do understand that it was a fairly cheap digital camera from
    Walmart so should be able to get a similar one here in Oz from
    the likes of Kmart.


    The original discussion about extreme depth of field was from here;
    http://www.photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=004Hcm



    o{O}o wrote in message ...
     
    o{O}o, Jan 20, 2005
    #11
  12. o{O}o

    Rob Guest


    You will find that manufactures quote the focal length of there digital
    cameras in 35mm (film camera) equivalents. But is not the actual focal
    length of the lens itself.

    Since the "film size"(sensor)of the camera mentioned is half the size of
    a 35mm film - actually one quarter in area - then to allow you a normal
    lens - worked out is the diagonal of the sensor in millimeters. will
    give you the standard size lens.


    So a 5.5mm lens has the same characteristics if used on a small sensor
    or a 35mm film namely DOF in this instance.
     
    Rob, Jan 20, 2005
    #12
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