Digital photography with flatbedscanner

Discussion in 'Scanners' started by Vincent de Groot, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. Vincent de Groot, Jun 15, 2006
    #1
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  2. Vincent de Groot

    Dmac Guest

    I'll give out a few previously not published "secrets" now.
    Flat bed scanners are basically like hugely expensive scanning back
    digital cameras. One fellow I know has been using one on a "copy camera"
    for years to photograph paintings for reproduction as canvas prints.

    When ever I find one of the monolithic vertical cameras like he uses,
    I'll be doing the same. Until then I use a 5D for the job and only get
    "nearly as good" as his stuff.

    I discovered about 5 years ago that the best way to "photograph"
    jewelery was to use a flat bed scanner to do the image capture. The
    Jeweler I did the catalogue for remarked they were the best pictures of
    his work he had ever had done.

    The images from a FB scanner are "first generation" stuff and are likely
    to be way better than anything done with an anti-alias filter. Depth of
    field is the killer!

    Great example, congratulations and yes, they are photographs... Digital
    ones at that!
     
    Dmac, Jun 16, 2006
    #2
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  3. Vincent de Groot

    Lobby Dosser Guest

    Yes! Great article! I will soon have a surplus scanner that I was going to
    give away. Now I'm looking for a lens on ebay.
     
    Lobby Dosser, Jun 16, 2006
    #3
  4. It's hell to use for capturing BB however, or footers, or footie, or
    football, either bank of Atlantic....

    Lights can also be inserted for special effects.
     
    John McWilliams, Jun 16, 2006
    #4
  5. Hi Wayne,
    I will be happy so see that link,

    Vinc

    http://www.photo-vinc.com
     
    Vincent de Groot, Jun 16, 2006
    #5
  6. Oh, it's great for portraits; really dramatic light fall off, great
    shadows, incredible detail such as seeing *into* pores.... And the age
    old copier at the office loses out when used for the, uh, other cheeks.
     
    John McWilliams, Jun 16, 2006
    #6
  7. Vincent de Groot

    Tim Guest


    Can someone enlighten an idiot please :)

    How do you set a scanner up as a camera?
    Do you need to set up a bellows type rig with a glass plate to focus and
    then swop that out for the scanner or are there neater tricks?

    TIA

    Tim
     
    Tim, Jun 16, 2006
    #7
  8. Vincent de Groot

    Tim Guest

    Ok, you could have read the articles quoted :) but here goes:
    Hi Wayne

    Interesting site, thanks for the link

    Sorry I didn't write the question very well

    I'm up to speed on the scanning/imaging side of things and have had a play
    with it in the past

    I was hoping for a bit more info on your point 2 below, things like the rig
    set up, are there any tips and tricks, focusing/exposure tips etc
    Are you stuck with setting up a view camera set up or can you do fun things
    with a pin hole box strapped to the front of the scanner etc

    Thanks for any hints

    Tim
     
    Tim, Jun 17, 2006
    #8
  9. Good points; sounds like you have more fun with scanners than most...

    Wayne, I wonder if you have tried Mozilla for news. You might like it
    way better than Google. Using a news reader has a lot of advantages. I
    am assuming your ISP offers a news feed, of course; perhaps I shouldn't.
    I happen to use Thunderbird for News, and as a back up mail client.
     
    John McWilliams, Jun 17, 2006
    #9
  10. One problem with the LiDE scanners is their incredibly shallow depth of
    field. Regular flatbed scanners have a small CCD, perhaps an inch long,
    and use a lens to image the full width of the paper (usually 8.5 inches)
    onto that. The light path is folded a couple of times for compactness
    of the scanning head, but the light travels about a foot from paper to
    the lens. All this means that there's a reasonable DOF, on the order of
    several mm at least, above the scanner glass on a regular scanner.

    But the LiDE scanners use a sensor that is 8.5 inches long. Instead of
    a single lens, they use an array of thousands of little lenslike things
    arranged in what looks like a black plastic bar to image the paper
    surface onto the sensor. The optics are working at 1:1, and the object
    and image distance is maybe 1 cm or less. So the DOF is very small, and
    anything that's not right on the glass is out of focus.

    (It's really an interesting optical system. I suspect the "lenses" are
    really GRIN lenses, pieces of specially-made fiber optics that can focus
    images. The image produced has to be *right way around*, not inverted
    like a normal single lens image, in order for the thousands of
    overlapping little images to produce one seamless single image on the
    sensor.)

    Dave
     
    Dave Martindale, Jun 19, 2006
    #10
  11. Hi Dave,

    That is true. But hey, you can't have everything :)

    Seriously, it is all a tradeoff. I like the LiDEs because I can use them
    with a laptop away from power.

    Cheers,

    Wayne
     
    Wayne J. Cosshall, Jun 19, 2006
    #11
  12. I haven't tried that, but I do use a LiDE unit as my main scanner
    connected to a desktop computer. It takes up far less desk space. I
    use it for all paper and photo print scanning I do.

    But when I want to get the best possible image of something that won't
    lie flat on the glass, it's time to think about getting out the old
    clunker big-box scanner.

    Dave
     
    Dave Martindale, Jun 19, 2006
    #12
  13. When, if and as I get a new scanner, I will seriously consider the Canon.

    W- Nice looking news client you got there! With T-Bird, hit K and the
    whole thread disappears, forever. A thread that's tiresome but may be
    revived, hit R and it'll be marked Read for that session. The way I read
    is by (in the menu bar) View -> Threaded-> Threads with Unread, and then
    scroll through each via the spacebar. There are dozens of other ways to
    navigate through, depends on preferences.
     
    John McWilliams, Jun 19, 2006
    #13
  14. Hi John,

    Thanks. Yes, I've switch to Thunderbird and love it. Thanks for the tip.
    Makes life much easier.

    Cheers,

    Wayne
     
    Wayne J. Cosshall, Jun 20, 2006
    #14
  15. Agreed. And that's how I use one for normal scanning, semi-vertical.
    Works great.

    Cheers,

    Wayne
     
    Wayne J. Cosshall, Jun 20, 2006
    #15
  16. Vincent de Groot

    Walter Banks Guest

    A wooden box and a surplus copier lens (They are actually quite good and cost maybe $10) a laptop and a cannon scanner and you too can be an Ansel Adams. It is a serious comment high resolution wide angle photography. almost makes one want to spend a $100
    and a workshop afternoon creating a modern version of a big format camera.

    Many years ago big groups were arranged in a semi circle with a camera that moved film as it rotated to image the group as one long narrow image a feat for the modern day scanner camera might also do.

    w..
     
    Walter Banks, Jun 20, 2006
    #16
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