DL in the field

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Alan Justice, Feb 16, 2011.

  1. Alan Justice

    Alan Justice Guest

    I just (finally) got my first digital camera (Canon 1D M4) (!). (I sell my
    images to
    magazines and as prints at art fairs and galleries.) I can record 44 GB on
    my 3 compact flash disks. (I just shoot raw: ~25 MB files). That's fine
    for local shooting, but on a road trip, I'll need more space. (I once took
    28 rolls of film in one day = 1k images. Digital promises the possibility
    of many more.) I'd like reccommendations on what else I need to buy.

    Minimum requirement is just downloading to a larger disk, or more CF cards.
    Ideally, I could also review the images that day, back at the motel or
    campground (a 3" LCD is only so good, although I also need some experience
    to see how much I can rely on it.) to see if I
    need to reshoot some. For that, I assume I need a notebook. Or is there
    something cheaper that will just allow image review? Other options?
     
    Alan Justice, Feb 16, 2011
    #1
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  2. Alan Justice

    Savageduck Guest

    Different folks here are going to have different opinions & proposals.
    Just remember the only one which is going to work is the one you
    actually use, and is simple for you to use.
    Here is my suggestion, there will be others, your job will be to sort
    through everything your post provokes.

    First, it sounds as if you bought three 16GB CF cards, memory is
    relatively cheap. Just as you carried extra film carry extra CF cards.

    Since your shots represent income, establish a back-up protocol. Think
    redundant back-up.

    I use a 250GB ColorSpace UDMA for back-up when on the road. it can be
    used in the field, car, camp, and/or back at hotel room. They are
    available in capacities of up to 750GB.
    < http://www.hypershop.com/HyperDrive-COLORSPACE-UDMA-s/64.htm >

    Then as soon as possible copy to a portable USB/Firewire Hard Drive via
    a laptop, or desktop if you are returning to your work base. These are
    inexpensive and will establish a second redundant leg to the back-up
    protocol.

    Do not erase or reformat the CF Cards until you have a minimum of two
    redundant legs to your copy protocol, unless you have no other option
    other than a field copy to the Colorspace UDMA.

    Then develop a protocol for archiving. I would consider some additional
    outboard Hard Drive, possibly a RAID system for your primary work
    computer.

    ....er, buy more CF memory.
     
    Savageduck, Feb 16, 2011
    #2
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  3. Alan Justice

    Alan Justice Guest

     
    Alan Justice, Feb 16, 2011
    #3
  4. Alan Justice

    Savageduck Guest

     
    Savageduck, Feb 16, 2011
    #4
  5. Alan Justice

    Bill Graham Guest

    Be able to charge your camera's, (and laptop's) batteries from your car
    cigarette lighter as you go.
     
    Bill Graham, Feb 16, 2011
    #5
  6. Alan Justice

    Savageduck Guest

    On 2011-02-16 13:03:18 -0800, "Bill Graham" <> said:

    Got that covered Bill.
    < http://us.kensington.com/html/17163.html >
     
    Savageduck, Feb 16, 2011
    #6
  7. Alan Justice

    Bill Graham Guest

    Looks like a good device. I try to buy 12 volt devices, but I was worried
    about the fact that a car alternator delivers over 14 volts for charging the
    battery at times, so I purchased a device that will operate on anything from
    9 to 16 volts, and regulate it down to exactly 12 volts. It cost about $30,
    but I used it as a buffer between my car and my camera. I didn't want to
    risk smoking a $2000 camera with an overvoltage from the cheap electronics
    in a car....
     
    Bill Graham, Feb 16, 2011
    #7
  8. Alan Justice

    Alan Justice Guest

    Yeah, I have that. I'll need an extra camera battery, even though they
    charge in only 2 hr, at least in my house. Thanks.
     
    Alan Justice, Feb 16, 2011
    #8
  9. Alan Justice

    Noons Guest


    I've got a little Samsung netbook that comes with wifi, 1Gb E'net,
    three USB ports, car lighter and universal charger, loaded with WinXP
    Pro. I've added the display profiles to let it show stuff in
    Adobergb, and loaded Irfanview on it with all the plug-ins. Irfanview
    does a very passable job of "cooking" any raw file - it uses dcraw
    libraries.
    To that I've added a WD 1TB USB portable drive, one universal power
    plug converter and a power plaque with 4 plug points.
    Total cost? Around 400 Pacific pesos for the netbook and electricals
    and 150 for the USB drive. That was start 2010, nowadays it can
    likely be done for a lot less.
    It's served me well in East Timor in Aug 2010, to offload stuff off
    the D200 and publish it to FB.
    Might not be the creme de la crap, but it damn well works for me!
    ;)
     
    Noons, Feb 17, 2011
    #9
  10. Alan Justice

    Noons Guest

    Sorry, forgot to add: the Samsung comes with an SD and a CF card
    socket. All I have to do is plonk the cards from the little Panasonic
    FT2 and the D200 into it and they show up as disk drives.
     
    Noons, Feb 17, 2011
    #10
  11. Alan Justice

    Eric Stevens Guest

    Its not cheap electronics. Its the way that a lead-acid cell works.
    12V is only a nominal voltage.
     
    Eric Stevens, Feb 17, 2011
    #11
  12. Alan Justice

    Bill Graham Guest

    Reminds me of something I did back in the 60's. I installed an inverter
    under the hood of my car, and put an AC wall plut in my dashboard. With
    this, I could use standard househole appliances while driving my car. In
    particular, I used my electric razor to shave while I was driving to work.
    In those days, all the inverters put our square waves, but today, you can
    get them that put out sine wave shaped waves that are 117 VAC at 60 hertz,
    just like your house service. I mounted mine close to the car battery with
    only a heavy duty relay to interrupt the current that I could activate with
    a switch on my dashboard. Once, my car broke down on the freeway, and I
    pulled over to the side of the road, and was looking under my hood with a
    drop cord. Got some real interesting looks from passers by who wondered
    where my "juice" was coming from....
     
    Bill Graham, Feb 17, 2011
    #12
  13. Alan Justice

    Bill Graham Guest

    Thats true. I shouldn't have used, "cheap". What I really meant is that the
    cars electrical system wasn't made for delicate & precise equipment like
    cameras and computers, so I buffered it with a regulated power supply
    module.
     
    Bill Graham, Feb 17, 2011
    #13
  14. Alan Justice

    Alan Browne Guest

    If you don't already have a laptop then a netbook is a pretty good
    option: cheap, small, light, enough storage and you'll have basic
    access to WiFi / Ethernet, basic image editing for quick e-mails of
    shots and so on.
     
    Alan Browne, Feb 18, 2011
    #14
  15. Alan Justice

    Paul Furman Guest

    I haven't had any problem with working off a pair of car batteries in my
    camper van with an inverter to 120v. Perhaps that device regulates the
    voltage? It's kind of wasteful because the laptop takes something less
    than 120v ... I thought something like 9v, but each device is different
    and presumably pretty picky. The camera battery chargers all use 120 so
    that's at least only one layer deep in conversion.
     
    Paul Furman, Feb 18, 2011
    #15
  16. Alan Justice

    Alan Justice Guest

    I do need to replace my klunky old desktop at home (Win 98), but I only get
    dial-up internet connection, so does it make sense to get a "netbook"?
     
    Alan Justice, Feb 18, 2011
    #16
  17. Alan Justice

    Savageduck Guest

    It makes sense to get a new computer if you have a real need for one
    feature it offers.

    If all you are using your Win 98 machine for is WP & E-mail, it is
    going to be just fine.

    If you are going to continue with your photographic enterprise, you
    need to give yourself the support tools for that.

    Up date your home computer and consider a decent laptop, not a netbook.
    As far as dial-up vs. broadband goes, if you are in a location where
    broadband is available via cable, ADSL, etc. seriously consider making
    the move from dial-up. If you have no other choice, a laptop with WiFi
    will still have its usefulness.
    A laptop with WiFi connectivity is very useful on the road. Most motels
    and even places such as National Park facilities have broadband WiFi.
    This will prove useful if you use any sort of off-site server for file
    storage, and for maintaining your web site.

    Also, if you go with a decent laptop, you might find you have no need
    to replace your desk top. Most better laptops can be used with a
    separate monitor and keyboard, making it a useful tool for both the
    home/office and the road, thereby killing two birds with one computer.
     
    Savageduck, Feb 18, 2011
    #17
  18. Alan Justice

    Eric Stevens Guest

    And yet, modern cars and trucks are stuffed full with computers which
    tolerate considerable voltage swings. You may be being overly cautious
    with the specs of your 12V power supply.
     
    Eric Stevens, Feb 18, 2011
    #18
  19. Alan Justice

    Noons Guest

    Alan Justice wrote,on my timestamp of 19/02/2011 4:32 AM:
    You said in the original post that you wanted to review images at a motel or on
    the road. That is where a netbook is handy. If you want a system for home use,
    then obviously a netbook is not the solution. There is no such thing as a setup
    that can do everything: horses for courses is as valid in IT as anywhere else.
     
    Noons, Feb 19, 2011
    #19
  20. Alan Justice

    Bill Graham Guest

    Well, both of my present cameras run on 12 VDC. they can get this from 8,
    1.5 volt flashlight batteries....I use double A type. But a car alternator
    charges the car's battery with like 14.5 volts, so I was worried that this
    might smoke the circuitry inside my cameras, and that's why I bought a
    regulated power supply that converts anything from about 8 to 18 volts DC to
    a regulated 12 volts DC. If the camera manufacturer published a set of real
    specifications on their cameras, I might not have needed such a thing, but
    what passes for specs now-a-days is really just advertising hype from
    Madison Avenue.....
     
    Bill Graham, Feb 19, 2011
    #20
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