do I really need a negative holder to scan with vuescan?

Discussion in 'Scanners' started by tracym, Jan 10, 2005.

  1. tracym

    tracym Guest

    hi,

    I'm thinking of gettng a scanner that is on the vuescan compatibility
    list. I want to scan some 4x5 b&w negatives. Could I just put the
    negative on the flatbed and scan it with that software, or would I
    have to have some kind of 4x5b negative holder?

    thanks,

    tracy
     
    tracym, Jan 10, 2005
    #1
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  2. tracym

    tracym Guest


    I guess I need to find out if there's a 4x5 transparency adapter for
    it. I'm looking at a HP 5300C right now. I kinda doubt it.

    thanks,

    tracy
     
    tracym, Jan 10, 2005
    #2
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  3. tracym

    Tom Ellliott Guest

    I guess I need to find out if there's a 4x5 transparency adapter for
    Even if your flatbed does not have a transparency adaptor you can do what I
    did untill I got my Epson 2450 at Goodwill for $20.00.
    Here is the link: http://www.tom-elliott-photography.com/hp-scanner.html
    "They" said it couldn't be done and yet there is the proof it CAN be done if
    one is carefull and skillfull.
    The higher the optical resollution the better the results. In my case I did
    push things a bit and went for the highest interpolated resolution I could
    get.
    Have fun.
    Yours,
    Tom Elliott
    Photographer
    http://www.tom-elliott-photography.com
     
    Tom Ellliott, Jan 10, 2005
    #3
  4. tracym

    tracym Guest


    Oh, wow. Well what if I just tape the negative to a light box, turn it
    upside down, and put the whole thing on any kind of flatbed scanner?
    Would that work? I already have a small/medium light box that was
    hand made.

    I am not looking to make a billboard from the negative. I just want
    to put the photos on my photo blog for friends.

    tracy
     
    tracym, Jan 10, 2005
    #4
  5. tracym

    Tom Ellliott Guest

    Well.......
    Go here and see one that works:
    http://www.tom-elliott-photography.com/hp-scanner.html
    Also a few scans done with my hardware hack.
    After I did my hardware hack I got a Microtek 5900 with a 4x5 builtin trans
    adaptor. Then I had a little bit of luck and found an Epson 2450 with a 4x9
    trans adaptor at Goodwill for $20.00!!!! I gave the original flatbed to my
    kids and I now have two flatbeds that work just fine for every thing from
    35mm up to 4x5. Now if I need a better scan than these two have to offer
    then I get Kodaks ProPhotoCD scan. If one is carefull and knows how to use
    the hardware/software combintaion then rarely do you have to send out for
    either the ProPhotoCD or....a drum scan.
    Seeing is believeing and it is really too bad some of the nay sayers don't
    live here in the Miami area to see the brochures, newsletters, calendars,
    and sunday supliments I have done with the above equipment. I mean when I
    had my "little" Nikon 995 I shot corporate headshots. I now have a Nikon D70
    and shoot raw.
    I have had art directors that were so against 35mm I would show the pictures
    first, then if they asked tell what the format was. As to 35 just look at
    National Geographic Magazine - the best example of fine 35mm work.
    So those of you out there on a limited hardware budget don't let the
    flammers - nay sayers and hardware snobs say it can't be done, because it
    can be done.
    Complete agreement on that point. In fact I am looking for an AnitNewton
    glass to do just that, meanwhile I put the emulsion face down and flop in
    Photo Shop.
    Have fun and make pictures.
    Yours,
    Tom Elliott Photography
     
    Tom Ellliott, Jan 10, 2005
    #5
  6. tracym

    Tom Ellliott Guest

    Tom Ellliott, Jan 10, 2005
    #6
  7. tracym

    tracym Guest

    On Mon, 10 Jan 2005 14:56:04 -0500, "Tom Ellliott"

    well, I tried something pretty weird. I taped the negative to the
    glass, covered it with a piece of paper, and held a cheap clip-on
    lamp over it. It came out looking like an old tintype. it would be
    cool, if that was the look I was going for.

    tracy
     
    tracym, Jan 11, 2005
    #7
  8. I'll bet that comes as a rather irritating surprise to all of the people
    who have managed it!

    One of the earliest hardware jigs available to scan film on a flatbed
    was simply an internally reflective corner that reflected the light from
    one half of the flatbed over, across, down and through the film laid out
    on the other side of the glass. Worked a treat and many people bought
    them or, even better, made their own. http://tinyurl.com/6qwtc gives
    instructions to build just such an adapter that is even cheaper than
    Tom's $25 light box, in fact it probably costs less than 25c and works
    just as well.
     
    Kennedy McEwen, Jan 11, 2005
    #8
  9. tracym

    tracym Guest


    Genius, you guys are all geniuses!

    tracy
     
    tracym, Jan 11, 2005
    #9
  10. tracym

    Tom Ellliott Guest

    Thanks for the tip!
    The reason I went for the $25 4x5 transparency sorter is that it was in my
    budget and it worked with the HP scanner I had at the time.
    It is fun to experiment and show the nay sayers there is more than one way
    to the mountaintop.
    Thomas Edison once said he NEver had an unsuccessfull experiment for he
    learned from them all...including the ones where the results were not what
    he was looking for.
    Have fun.
    Yours,
    Tom
     
    Tom Ellliott, Jan 11, 2005
    #10
  11. tracym

    Tom Ellliott Guest

    Thanks for the compliment. In reality we just like to play and make money at
    the same time...which is also to have been said that having fun and making
    money is impossible. Tell that to the late George Burns who attributed his
    long life to only doing what he wanted to do.
    Cheers Tracy it is a great big sand box out there.
    Yours,
    Tom
     
    Tom Ellliott, Jan 11, 2005
    #11
  12. tracym

    tracym Guest

    yore welcome.
    I love it. It helps a lot with the no-budget amateur film-making too,
    no?

    PS I used one of those blue daylight lightbulbs. I also tried it
    with the paper taped on the lamp rather than on the glass. You have
    to hold it still to avoid gettng those streaks on the scan.
     
    tracym, Jan 11, 2005
    #12
  13. tracym

    tracym Guest


    the thing about it is, that as I'm understanding, the width of the box
    would have to be a t least 4", probably more to comfortably cover a
    4x5 negative.

    Why not just cut out the front face of the cereal box, and line that
    with foil?

    hmm...I'll try it.

    tracy
     
    tracym, Jan 13, 2005
    #13
  14. tracym

    Tom Ellliott Guest

    Keep up the spirit of experimentation.
    Thomas Alva Edison would have loved to have you as partner.
    Yours,
    Tom
     
    Tom Ellliott, Jan 14, 2005
    #14
  15. tracym

    tracym Guest


    ah, thank you very much. I'm afraid it didn't work.
     
    tracym, Jan 14, 2005
    #15
  16. tracym

    Tom Ellliott Guest

    Oh well, it was still a succesfull (spelling??) test for you found out what
    Did Not work.
    Keep on trucking.
    Yours,
    Tom
     
    Tom Ellliott, Jan 14, 2005
    #16
  17. tracym

    MPA Guest

    diacover in munich has genious scanplates.
     
    MPA, Jan 15, 2005
    #17
  18. tracym

    Tom Ellliott Guest

    Many thanks for the link to the Munich site.
    GREAT!!
     
    Tom Ellliott, Jan 15, 2005
    #18
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