do I want a flash with "Auto Aperture and Non-TTL auto"?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by AFN, Dec 17, 2003.

  1. AFN

    AFN Guest

    I've posted here recently about a couple things, and people were nice enough
    to help guide me. I'm going to buy the Kodak DCS-14N digital camera to
    replace my 35mm Nikon. The problem is that I'm not used to flashes at all
    and I don't know if I need a flash with "Auto Aperture and Non-TTL auto"...

    The camera review at
    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/kodakdcs14n/page4.asp
    says this:

    "The DSC-14n has a standard Nikon hot-shoe which can accept a wide range of
    Nikon Speedlights including the SB-28Dx, SB-80DX and SB-50DX (pictured
    below). It supports D-TTL mode for the SB-28DX, SB-80DX and SB-50DX as well
    as Auto Aperture and Non-TTL auto with the SB-28DX and SB-80DX."

    The 50DX flash is a good price ($115 after rebate right now) but the above
    paragraph suggests it won't have "Auto Aperture and Non-TTL auto" like the
    SB-28DX or SB-80DX. But I don't think they sell the 28DX anymore because I
    don't see it at online stores. And the SB-80DX is $350.

    So... I do portrait photography of my kids... do I want "Auto Aperture and
    Non-TTL auto" and what the heck does this mean? And am I missing the
    SB-28DX online somewhere?
     
    AFN, Dec 17, 2003
    #1
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  2. There are lots of them on eBay....Some are brand new/never used. Should cost
    you around $200. It's a great flash. I don't really know why Nikon
    discontinued it. Some camera stores still have one or two in stock, too. I
    saw one in a Shutterbug about 6 months ago.....
     
    William Graham, Dec 18, 2003
    #2
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  3. AFN

    AFN Guest



    Thanks, but ...

    do I even want "Auto Aperture and Non-TTL auto" and what the heck does this
    mean?
     
    AFN, Dec 18, 2003
    #3
  4. Well, Nikon tries to make their flashes (and lenses) fit on as many of their
    old bodies as possible, so it will have modes that you will probably never
    use unless you have a real old body. All the modes I use with mine are ttl
    automatic, where the body quenches the flash when it gets enough light,
    which it measures through the lense while the picture is being taken. IOW,
    it opens the shutter, and sets off the flash, and when the film has received
    the right amount of light for a correct exposure, the camera turns the flash
    off, and then closes the shutter. But the SB-28 is versatile enough to be
    used on older bodies that can't do this. In these older bodies, the amount
    of light is controlled by the apeture of the lens, which must be adjusted
    according to how far you are away from the subject....The further away you
    are, the wider the apeture must be in order to gather the right amount of
    light.
     
    William Graham, Dec 18, 2003
    #4
  5. AFN

    Koen Guest

    Hi,

    I used a DCS-14N for a couple of days. Its a fantastic camera for studio
    work. And really for nothing else, just my opinion.

    I used it with a Nikon SB-20, so i also had only manual and auto flash.
    Which is ok, but you lose a bit of time setting apertures on the flash.
    Flash compensation (for e.g. fill flash) is manual only. You also have to
    compensate for filters on your lens (due to the lack of TTL). For studio
    photography, lack of DTTL is no problem at all I think.

    For snapshots of kids etc. you do want TTL.

    So the results with a non-DTTL flash are as good as with the latest SB-800,
    you just need a bit more time to set the flash aperture and film speed
    manually.

    Koen
     
    Koen, Dec 19, 2003
    #5
  6. AFN

    Koen Guest

    I will not read the NG in the coming days, to reply, remove "genebrol." from
    my address.

    Koen
     
    Koen, Dec 19, 2003
    #6
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