Does this gadget exist?

Discussion in 'UK Photography' started by David, Oct 18, 2004.

  1. David

    David Guest

    I have an Olympus C450 digital camera and hundreds of transparencies. Is
    there a frame or something which could clip onto the camera at the correct
    distance and then take photographs of the slides. Or is there some other
    independent gizmo I could buy

    Thanks
     
    David, Oct 18, 2004
    #1
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  2. David

    SL Guest

    Hi David,

    You'd be better off buying a dedicated film/slide scanner than the camera,
    with basic ones around £100, good ones around £150-250, and very good ones
    £350-550.

    Also, if detail is not the highest priority check out flatbed scanners for
    aroung £150, but the dedicated film ones will be much better.

    Cheers,
    Stephen
     
    SL, Oct 18, 2004
    #2
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  3. Definitely get a slide scanner. I'd recommend the Minolta Dual Scan IV
    for budget archiving. I got mine from Digital First:

    http://www.digitalfirst.co.uk/camdetail.asp?ProdID=1301&cat=Scanners

    Scan and archive your slides, then put it on eBay.

    It (and other dedicated slide scanners) can produce way better results
    than a digicam attachment. Mine can produce 14-megapixel 16-bit scans
    (74MB TIFF!) from a 35mm slide. Of course, you can run lower resolution
    scans, but if you have the storage space, a 16-bit-linear TIFF at
    3200dpi is not significantly lower quality than the film itself and can
    always be reduced later. ImageMagick and CinePaint will deal with 16-bit
    images, if you don't want to splash out on Photoshop.

    As an example, http://tranchant.plus.com/tmp/airport is a scan of a
    (rather dirty (as in dirt on the slide, not adult content!)) slide from
    the 1970s. The image is the full slide size, and the inset shows the
    resolution available from the scanner.
     
    Mark Tranchant, Oct 19, 2004
    #3
  4. David

    Peter Guest

    I have a few thousand slides to do and a lot of them are (please don't
    take this the wrong way) excellent pictures from various exotic places
    I went to years ago (before children :)) - the sort of stuff which
    would not look out of place on a calendar. And since getting the
    original slides out and setting up a slide projector and a large
    screen is such a hassle, I wanted to scan them with quality good
    enough to be able to discard them afterwards.

    I got a shop to scan a few with the Nikon 9000 (2 grand plus) and the
    Nikon 5000ED. There was no apparent difference no matter how closely I
    looked, and according to Nikon there shouldn't be for 35mm film. So I
    bought the Nikon 5000ED plus the bulk slide feeder, total cost about
    £1200. I scan at "48 bits" producing 130MB TIFFs, then in Photoshop I
    rotate any that need it, and then run a batch process in Photoshop to
    convert the lot to 24-bit JPEGs, at the "#10 quality" setting; this
    produces JPEGs of about 5-6MB. The PC is 3GHz with 1GB RAM and runs
    just acceptably fast.

    There is no way I would do any quantity of slides without a bulk
    feeder - it is a very slow process and would take for ever.

    One day, when one can get a 1280x1024 RGB projector which has
    reasonably accurate colour, that will be the way to do a "slide show".
    I think the resolution will be fine because I have a 6ft wide screen
    now and with the relatively cheap £400 slide projector I can see the
    film grain readily.


    Peter.
     
    Peter, Oct 19, 2004
    #4
  5. One day, when one can get a 1280x1024 RGB projector which has
    I agree thatan sxga or better projector would be super. However the current
    xga only projectors do a very decent job. I have given a number of slide
    shows- am very active in local photographic club circles and also do some
    commercial work- using one of these and unless you sit close to the screen the
    images appear very similar to normal 35mm trannies.

    In fact last week when we had a club event showing pictures taken on a trip to
    Kew Gardens, everybody preferred the electronically projected images.

    Colour rendition can be very good but you have to take care to set up the
    projector correctly and there can be an awful lot of options to go through!

    Chris
    www.oxfordphotography.co.uk
     
    CGannonOxford, Oct 20, 2004
    #5
  6. David

    Mark Dunn Guest

    DISCARD them? Aargh!
     
    Mark Dunn, Oct 20, 2004
    #6
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