Does this photo look weird?

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Alan Browne, Jan 15, 2011.

  1. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

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  2. Markus Fuenfrocken, Jan 15, 2011
    #2
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  3. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    Alan Browne, Jan 15, 2011
    #3
  4. Alan Browne

    Tim Conway Guest

    Tim Conway, Jan 15, 2011
    #4
  5. Alan Browne

    Paul Furman Guest

    Paul Furman, Jan 15, 2011
    #5
  6. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    Yes. I'm beginning to see that the fill light (open shade areas) blue
    sort of complements the beige/brown/green of the grass with the grey of
    the streets - still - eerie.
     
    Alan Browne, Jan 15, 2011
    #6
  7. Alan Browne

    John A. Guest

    Well, snow does tend to melt more slowly in shady areas, so it's not
    so surprising it would tend to be in the shadows of any given daylight
    shot.

    It still strikes me as being possibly tone-mapped or otherwise
    processed some to bring up the shadows a bit, though. Maybe. It would
    have to be with a single shot, though, I would think, given that the
    angle implies it was taken from an aircraft.
     
    John A., Jan 16, 2011
    #7
  8. Alan Browne

    Joe Makowiec Guest

    I dunno. Given that today's dSLRs can take 5-10 frames per second, that
    they can auto-bracket, and that high-dynamic-range (HDR) software can do
    at least minimal auto-aligning, I don't think that it's out of the
    question that it's an HDR image.
     
    Joe Makowiec, Jan 16, 2011
    #8
  9. Alan Browne

    otter Guest

    It was taken pretty close to sunset, I believe, judging from the long
    shadows. I would bet that North is diagonally to the bottom right.
    The road with the cul-de-sac probably runs North-South.

    It looks like fill light was used to open up the shadows, but I
    wouldn't say it's much more than that. It's just the light from that
    time of day causing the "glow".
     
    otter, Jan 16, 2011
    #9
  10. Alan Browne

    Savageduck Guest

    It is quite possible to do 32-bit, single frame tone-mapping.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 16, 2011
    #10
  11. Alan Browne

    John A. Guest

    I'd estimate the ratio of shadow length to object height to be roughly
    2:1. So the sun would be about 20-30 degrees above the horizon. What
    time in the afternoon would that put it near Chicago this time of
    year? Early to mid afternoon?

    Just an estimate.
     
    John A., Jan 16, 2011
    #11
  12. David J Taylor, Jan 16, 2011
    #12
  13. []
    ... and perhaps some contribution from the reflected snow?

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jan 16, 2011
    #13
  14. Alan Browne

    Robert Coe Guest

    : > On Sat, 15 Jan 2011 16:08:43 -0500, "Tim Conway"
    : >
    : >
    : > >: >
    : > >>http://www.chicagotribune.com/media/photo/2011-01/58807298.jpg
    : >
    : > >Looks to me to be coincidental.  Like snow banks piled up in the culdesacs
    : > >and the lighting making it look that "other worldly" effect.
    : > >Seems to glow, doesn't it?
    : >
    : > Well, snow does tend to melt more slowly in shady areas, so it's not
    : > so surprising it would tend to be in the shadows of any given daylight
    : > shot.
    : >
    : > It still strikes me as being possibly tone-mapped or otherwise
    : > processed some to bring up the shadows a bit, though. Maybe. It would
    : > have to be with a single shot, though, I would think, given that the
    : > angle implies it was taken from an aircraft.
    :
    : It was taken pretty close to sunset, I believe, judging from the long
    : shadows. I would bet that North is diagonally to the bottom right.
    : The road with the cul-de-sac probably runs North-South.
    :
    : It looks like fill light was used to open up the shadows, but I
    : wouldn't say it's much more than that. It's just the light from that
    : time of day causing the "glow".

    It would take a mighty powerful source to provide fill light for a scene like
    that. And such a source could hardly have been anywhere near the camera. At
    most one of the building roofs appears to be illuminated from the direction of
    the viewer.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jan 16, 2011
    #14
  15. Alan Browne

    otter Guest

    A powerful source? How powerful is photoshop?
     
    otter, Jan 16, 2011
    #15
  16. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    First off he said it looks "like".

    In post, camera raw import has a "fill light" adjustment which lightens
    up the darker areas of the scene. Can also be achieved in editing with
    curves.
     
    Alan Browne, Jan 16, 2011
    #16
  17. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    More powerful than any light on earth as far as emulating fill light goes.
     
    Alan Browne, Jan 16, 2011
    #17
  18. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    Indeed. But I doubt the toxic substance is responsible for the look on
    that shot...
     
    Alan Browne, Jan 16, 2011
    #18
  19. Alan Browne

    Robert Coe Guest

    : > On Sat, 15 Jan 2011 19:18:56 -0800 (PST), otter <>
    : > wrote:
    : > : > On Sat, 15 Jan 2011 16:08:43 -0500, "Tim Conway"
    : >
    : > : >
    : > : > >: > : >
    : > : > >>http://www.chicagotribune.com/media/photo/2011-01/58807298.jpg
    : > : >
    : > : > >Looks to me to be coincidental. Like snow banks piled up in the culdesacs
    : > : > >and the lighting making it look that "other worldly" effect.
    : > : > >Seems to glow, doesn't it?
    : > : >
    : > : > Well, snow does tend to melt more slowly in shady areas, so it's not
    : > : > so surprising it would tend to be in the shadows of any given daylight
    : > : > shot.
    : > : >
    : > : > It still strikes me as being possibly tone-mapped or otherwise
    : > : > processed some to bring up the shadows a bit, though. Maybe. It would
    : > : > have to be with a single shot, though, I would think, given that the
    : > : > angle implies it was taken from an aircraft.
    : > :
    : > : It was taken pretty close to sunset, I believe, judging from the long
    : > : shadows.  I would bet that North is diagonally to the bottom right.
    : > : The road with the cul-de-sac probably runs North-South.
    : > :
    : > : It looks like fill light was used to open up the shadows, but I
    : > : wouldn't say it's much more than that.  It's just the light from that
    : > : time of day causing the "glow".
    : >
    : > It would take a mighty powerful source to provide fill light for a scene like
    : > that. And such a source could hardly have been anywhere near the camera. At
    : > most one of the building roofs appears to be illuminated from the direction of
    : > the viewer.
    : >
    : > Bob
    :
    : A powerful source? How powerful is photoshop?

    <chuckle!>

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jan 16, 2011
    #19
  20. Alan Browne

    RichA Guest

    RichA, Jan 16, 2011
    #20
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