DOUBLE TONING (Dual Sepia) 1939

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Lloyd Erlick, Apr 28, 2007.

  1. Lloyd Erlick

    Lloyd Erlick Guest

    April 28, 2007, from Lloyd Erlick,

    I've been looking at my stash of boxed up old
    books ... (no guarantees that this formula
    works on current materials, or ever did, for
    that matter) ...

    regards,
    --le
    ________________________________
    Lloyd Erlick Portraits, Toronto.
    website: www.heylloyd.com
    telephone: 416-686-0326
    email:
    ________________________________


    [from "Fortunes in Formulas" by Hiscox and
    Sloane, Norman Henley Publishing, 1937-1939.]


    DOUBLE TONING (Dual Sepia):

    Here is a toner that will give two shades of
    different browns in the one picture, and the
    effect is very pleasing.

    Make a solution of one-half ounce chromic
    acid in 10 ounces water. Place the print in
    this solution until it nearly fades out
    (about a minute or so). Wash the print in
    running water and then place the print in
    ordinary film developer (M.Q.) and redevelop
    back to visibility.

    This formula takes the place of the old time
    sulphide print for rich browns. Unlike the
    old time sulphide process the above is
    odorless and less liable to produce insoluble
    stains.
     
    Lloyd Erlick, Apr 28, 2007
    #1
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  2. One can get a similar effect by using Potassium
    Ferricyanide bleach and in normal Sepia toning. The bleach
    affects the size and shape of the silver crystals so that
    they are sometimes more warm toned after redevelopment but
    the effect depends on the emulsion. One great drawback to
    this method is that the final image is metallic silver so it
    is not protected from oxidation as is the silver sulfide
    image from the usual sulfide toning.
    If split tones are desired they can be gotten by partial
    bleaching in normal Sepia toner. The darker parts of the
    image will retain a lot of silver so will be toned less than
    the highlights. Interesting effects can be gotten by a
    subsequent toning in a "direct" toner, for instance two
    shades of Brown. Also, a sulfide image treated in a Gold
    toner will turn some shade of red. So, if a partially toned
    image is treated in Gold the highlights will become red or
    reddish brown and the shadows will become blue. Since both
    sulfide and Gold are effective in protecting the image such
    a split toned image will be quite permanent although a
    final fixing step is probably a good idea.
    Note that using a Bichromate bleach followed by
    redevelopment in a standard, active, developer is
    essentially the same as chrome intensifier.
     
    Richard Knoppow, Apr 28, 2007
    #2
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  3. An addendum: the chromic acid bleach will leave a stain
    which can be cleared by treating the print in a bath of
    Sodium Sulfite and subsequent washing. Kodak Hypo Clearing
    Agent, perhaps a little stronger than normal working
    solution, will work fine as a clearing bath.
     
    Richard Knoppow, Apr 28, 2007
    #3
  4. Lloyd Erlick

    dan.c.quinn Guest

    April 28, 2007, from Lloyd Erlick,
    That is a bleach without the bromide. The bleach can be done
    with the more usual ferricyanide although the end results are not
    likely the exact same. With the later the compound created is silver
    ferrocyanide; with the acid ?. With both and carried out with the
    lights
    on, either of the silver compounds are ready for a developer or a
    sulfide
    or some other intermediate treatment.
    Now days, IIRC, some dichromate would be used although for "two
    shades of different browns" the acid may be needed. Dan
     
    dan.c.quinn, Apr 30, 2007
    #4
  5. Lloyd Erlick

    dan.c.quinn Guest

    April 28, 2007, from Lloyd Erlick,
    That is a bleach without the bromide. The bleach can be done
    with the more usual ferricyanide although the end results are not
    likely the exact same. With the later the compound created is silver
    ferrocyanide; with the acid ?. With both and carried out with the
    lights
    on, either of the silver compounds are ready for a developer or a
    sulfide
    or some other intermediate treatment.
    Now days, IIRC, some dichromate would be used although for "two
    shades of different browns" the acid may be needed. Dan
     
    dan.c.quinn, Apr 30, 2007
    #5
  6. I don't exactly know what this ancient book means by
    "chromic acid". A dichromate bleach made with Hydrochloric
    acid will convert the silver to Silver Chloride, which can
    be redeveloped. This is in fact Chromium intensifier. Of
    course, the image could be redeveloped in Sodium Sulfide
    resulting in a silver sulfide image the same as conventional
    Sepia toner, but likely of a different shade. Chromium
    intensifier is simple, here, for example, is Kodak In-4

    Kodak In-4 Chromium Intensifier Stock Solution
    Potassium Bichromate 90.0 grams
    Hydrochloric Acid 64.0 ml
    Water to make 1.0 liter

    For use dilute one part stock to 10 parts water.
    The negative should be hardened in a Formaldehyde hardener
    before treatment.
    Treat the negative until the image is completely bleached
    out. Then wash for 5 minutes. Then redevelop in strong
    artificial light or daylight in a rapidly acting, low
    sulfite, developer. Dektol or D-72 diluted 1:3 is a good
    choice. Full redevelopment may take 10 minutes. Then rinse
    and fix for 5 minutes. Then wash thoroughly. The process can
    be repeated.
    Images resulting from Chromium intensification may not be
    completely permanent.
     
    Richard Knoppow, May 1, 2007
    #6
  7. Lloyd Erlick

    David Kuss Guest

    Is the the same stuff named in
    http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/npgd0138.html ?
    I was interested in giving it a try, until I read the cautions!
    Or am I just a worrier?
    D

     
    David Kuss, May 2, 2007
    #7
  8. I am rather skeptical of the formulas in _Fortunes in
    Formulas_, many are very old and use non-standard
    terminology and may be sloppy about chemical names. I
    suspect the substance used in the formula posted is
    Potassium dichromate, there is an MSDS for this at:
    http://www.jtbaker.com/msds/englishhtml/p5719.htm
    Its no safer than Chromic acid. Potassium dichromate is
    used for a number of photographic purposes, for instance,
    tray cleaner, a bleach to remove metallic silver but not
    undeveloped halide (as in reversal processing), and as a
    senstizer for processes like Carbon and gum that depend on
    differential hardening. It can be used for toners but one
    can get similar results with much safer materials. If you
    want to double tone one simple way is to use conventional
    "Sepia" toner removing the print from the bleach before
    bleaching is complete. This will leave the darker areas
    untoned. You can subsequently tone them in another type of
    toner. For instance, a Gold toner will tone the Sepia part
    red and the silver part blue. Other toners, like Liver of
    Sulfur (Kodak Brown Toner), or Selenium toner (Kodak Rapid
    Selenium Toner) will tone the silver part some other shade
    of brown than the Sepia part. There are many other
    variations.
    A good source for information are Tim Rudman's books,
    _The Photographer's Master Printing Course_ and _The
    Photographer's Toning Book_. You might also want to look at
    his book on lith printing. This is an application of
    lithographic developers to printing paper which produces
    interesting effects which can not be duplicated any other
    way.
     
    Richard Knoppow, May 26, 2007
    #8
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