drying cut film

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Mike Schuler, Oct 6, 2004.

  1. Mike Schuler

    Mike Schuler Guest

    I'm wondering how one would go about drying 120 or 135 film which has
    already been cut - for example if you want to refix a negative or
    intensify/reduce it. I use Jobo clips to hang newly developed film,
    but these put a couple of holes in the negative. Any suggestions?
     
    Mike Schuler, Oct 6, 2004
    #1
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  2. Mike Schuler

    Frank Pittel Guest

    : I'm wondering how one would go about drying 120 or 135 film which has
    : already been cut - for example if you want to refix a negative or
    : intensify/reduce it. I use Jobo clips to hang newly developed film,
    : but these put a couple of holes in the negative. Any suggestions?

    What I do in these situations is to put paper towels on a counter that come up
    to a wall. I have the paper towel go up the wall folding it so that it follows the
    corner reasonably well. I then lay the negative on the counter so that one edge
    is on the counter and then lean it up against the paper towel on the wall so that
    the opposite edge is on the wall. The paper towels absorb excess water so it dries
    quickly. It does have a tendency to curl the negative a bit so every now and again
    I flip the negative.
    --




    Keep working millions on welfare depend on you
     
    Frank Pittel, Oct 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. Well, a plastic sack full of clothespins from the supermarket can
    serve if you have a load of cut strips. You know, run a line from one
    wall to the other and clip them by the edges right up there.

    Clipping to a wire clothes hanger works for some lesser number.

    Now, Frank's suggestion is an interesting technique. The only problem
    is that it could draw the attention of the namelessly radioactive one.

    I'm watching you , Frank!

    :D :D :D.
    Robert Vervoordt, MFA
     
    Robert Vervoordt, Oct 6, 2004
    #3
  4. Mike Schuler

    Frank Pittel Guest

    : On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 12:28:05 -0500, Frank Pittel

    : >: I'm wondering how one would go about drying 120 or 135 film which has
    : >: already been cut - for example if you want to refix a negative or
    : >: intensify/reduce it. I use Jobo clips to hang newly developed film,
    : >: but these put a couple of holes in the negative. Any suggestions?
    : >
    : >What I do in these situations is to put paper towels on a counter that come up
    : >to a wall. I have the paper towel go up the wall folding it so that it follows the
    : >corner reasonably well. I then lay the negative on the counter so that one edge
    : >is on the counter and then lean it up against the paper towel on the wall so that
    : >the opposite edge is on the wall. The paper towels absorb excess water so it dries
    : >quickly. It does have a tendency to curl the negative a bit so every now and again
    : >I flip the negative.

    : Well, a plastic sack full of clothespins from the supermarket can
    : serve if you have a load of cut strips. You know, run a line from one
    : wall to the other and clip them by the edges right up there.

    : Clipping to a wire clothes hanger works for some lesser number.

    Doesn't that tend to mark the negatives?? My understanding is that the film
    has already been cut into strips which means the leaders at the end are gone.

    : Now, Frank's suggestion is an interesting technique. The only problem
    : is that it could draw the attention of the namelessly radioactive one.

    : I'm watching you , Frank!

    :)
    --




    Keep working millions on welfare depend on you
     
    Frank Pittel, Oct 6, 2004
    #4
  5. That is my understanding as well. All that's left is the edges of the
    35mm from the inner part of the sprockets to the edge where the frame
    numbers and other markings can appear and the edges of the 120 where
    the edge markings and frame numbers appear. In both cases, there is
    ample room to use for the narrow clipping area of clothespins. And
    so...

    Robert Vervoordt, MFA
     
    Robert Vervoordt, Oct 7, 2004
    #5
  6. With care, it should be possible to clip by a corner and mark only the
    sprocket hole strip. That's easier if a metal clip is used; for most of
    the past year I've hung my negatives with magnet backed metal document
    clips (sold as office supplies, three for $1.50 IIRC), one stuck on the
    shade bowl of a torchiere lamp and the other to the pole of the same
    lamp; the same thing should work with a strip of 5 or 6 frames by simply
    letting the lower clip hang free, or by attaching both clips to the same
    flat surface (fridge door, frex).

    --
    I may be a scwewy wabbit, but I'm not going to Alcatwaz!
    -- E. J. Fudd, 1954

    Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer
    Lathe Building Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/HomebuiltLathe.htm
    Speedway 7x12 Lathe Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/my7x12.htm

    Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
    and don't expect them to be perfect.
     
    Donald Qualls, Oct 7, 2004
    #6
  7. Mike Schuler

    Mike King Guest

    I like the Patterson film clips with the two really sharp little pins. On
    35mm you can just let a pin slip right through a socket hole on opposite
    corners and the neg will hang from one clip and be weighted on the other.
    For 120 you carefully clip the neg in the clear area between frames trying
    only to grip the film and not pierce it (film will always distort around a
    hole) and weight the bottom with another clip.
     
    Mike King, Oct 7, 2004
    #7
  8. Mike Schuler

    AnonyMouse Guest

    I've had a lot of success with paper clips on 35mm.
    Unbend a perfectly good paper clip into sort of a "S" shape. Place the
    bottom loop of the "S" through a sprocket hole at one corner of the strip.
    The top loop can be used to hang the stuff just about anywhere.
    The nickel plating on paper clip wire inhibits rust and its asociated
    problems.
     
    AnonyMouse, Oct 7, 2004
    #8
  9. Mike Schuler

    Mike Schuler Guest

    Thanks to all for some great ideas. If I discover anything
    earth-shattering when trying them out, I'll report back.
     
    Mike Schuler, Oct 8, 2004
    #9
  10. Mike Schuler

    BertS Guest

    For 35mm I use paper clips that I open to an S shape. Insert one end on the
    holes and hang. You can do the same at the other end and add a weight, if
    curling is a problem.

    On 120 you are on your own.

    Bert
     
    BertS, Oct 10, 2004
    #10
  11. I also use bent paper clips for 135.

    Hemostats for 120 works OK - not ideal, but I don't think
    there is an ideal.

    Often hear tirades about all the wasted space taken up by 35mm sprockets,
    but those strips of sprockets sure do make the negatives easier to
    handle.
     
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Oct 10, 2004
    #11
  12. Often hear tirades about all the wasted space taken up by 35mm sprockets,
    And they protect it from damage!
     
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 10, 2004
    #12
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