DSLR Gear No Idea

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Sandman, May 31, 2013.

  1. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    So, Sony has launched a new advertisement campaign called DSLR Gear No
    Idea. It's a series of video clips on Youtube that makes fun of people
    that use large DSLR cameras while not always knowing how to handle
    them, here's an example:

    YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rnaIFjJkuzQ

    Viral marketing, the idea here is that you'll share this with the
    friends you have that may fit one of the categories. The videos
    themselves are marketing free, other than a link to the Youtube
    channel, which itself has a link to Sony's NEX cameras [1] where they
    claim that you get "DSLR quality without the difficulty". There they
    have similar videos, but with more of a advertising message:

    YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=998_4YeeDbc

    As a DSLR-owner I can totally identify with bringing a large camera to
    my kids sporting events and that may end up making me look a bit
    silly, like the guy in the video. But there is a reason why I bring a
    D3s with a 70-200/2.8 lens there, it's because of the outstanding
    performance of both the lens and the camera in ways the Sony NEX can't
    match. I have no doubt that the NEX is a fine camera, but when it
    comes to capture my kids in motion, it can't stack up to a real DSLR
    camera with a quick lens. Basically, the entire premise of the video
    is that the NEX is good for those that have DSLR but really doesn't
    know how to use them.

    And I think it's interesting that once given the NEX-7, the dad in the
    video doesn't look any less of a fool, he just have a slightly smaller
    camera in his hands.

    And another point is that Sony sells DSLR camera. How does these
    videos make the Sony DSLR owners feel? Sony making fun of their Sony
    cameras. It's not like Sony is trying to sell to a target group where
    they otherwise have no products, they are effectively marketing
    against their other products here. Weird!

    1: <http://www.sony.com.au/productcategory/nex-camera>


    --
    Sandman[.net]

    http://jonaseklundh.se/pages/Dslr_Gear_No_Idea?lang=en
     
    Sandman, May 31, 2013
    #1
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  2. Sandman

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On 31 May 2013 09:27:40 GMT, Sandman <> wrote:

    >As a DSLR-owner I can totally identify with bringing a large camera to
    >my kids sporting events and that may end up making me look a bit
    >silly,


    I have two grandsons who play in "Babe Ruth" baseball leagues. And,
    yes, I lug my Nikon to all the games. Because of the fences around
    the field, I bring a milk crate to stand on so I can shoot over -
    instead of through - the chain link fence.

    Most of the other parents/grandparents use their phones or iPads to
    take photos. One mother has a Nikon with a "Vari-Angle" viewfinder
    that allows her to hold the camera over her head, and over the fence,
    and shoot.

    Several of the parents - even ones using phone and pad cameras - have
    asked me to take photographs of their kids in action and email the
    results to them. I do so, of course.

    I've never felt silly in this activity.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, May 31, 2013
    #2
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  3. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <>,
    Tony Cooper <> wrote:

    > On 31 May 2013 09:27:40 GMT, Sandman <> wrote:
    >
    > >As a DSLR-owner I can totally identify with bringing a large camera to
    > >my kids sporting events and that may end up making me look a bit
    > >silly,

    >
    > I have two grandsons who play in "Babe Ruth" baseball leagues. And,
    > yes, I lug my Nikon to all the games. Because of the fences around
    > the field, I bring a milk crate to stand on so I can shoot over -
    > instead of through - the chain link fence.
    >
    > Most of the other parents/grandparents use their phones or iPads to
    > take photos. One mother has a Nikon with a "Vari-Angle" viewfinder
    > that allows her to hold the camera over her head, and over the fence,
    > and shoot.
    >
    > Several of the parents - even ones using phone and pad cameras - have
    > asked me to take photographs of their kids in action and email the
    > results to them. I do so, of course.
    >
    > I've never felt silly in this activity.


    Me neitehr, but perhaps others have thought you looked silly? I think
    that's the point of the ads anyway. The dad is just taking pictures, but
    to other's he is looking silly.

    The irony, to me, is that him looking silly is based more on how he
    moves and skips about rather than what type of camera he is using, and
    when switching to the NEX, he looks exactly as silly.



    --
    Sandman[.net]
     
    Sandman, May 31, 2013
    #3
  4. Sandman

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Fri, 31 May 2013 14:01:44 +0200, Sandman <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > Tony Cooper <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 31 May 2013 09:27:40 GMT, Sandman <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >As a DSLR-owner I can totally identify with bringing a large camera to
    >> >my kids sporting events and that may end up making me look a bit
    >> >silly,

    >>
    >> I have two grandsons who play in "Babe Ruth" baseball leagues. And,
    >> yes, I lug my Nikon to all the games. Because of the fences around
    >> the field, I bring a milk crate to stand on so I can shoot over -
    >> instead of through - the chain link fence.
    >>
    >> Most of the other parents/grandparents use their phones or iPads to
    >> take photos. One mother has a Nikon with a "Vari-Angle" viewfinder
    >> that allows her to hold the camera over her head, and over the fence,
    >> and shoot.
    >>
    >> Several of the parents - even ones using phone and pad cameras - have
    >> asked me to take photographs of their kids in action and email the
    >> results to them. I do so, of course.
    >>
    >> I've never felt silly in this activity.

    >
    >Me neitehr, but perhaps others have thought you looked silly?


    If so, it's me and I'd look that way with or without the camera.

    I don't think it's possible to look all that silly when photographing
    your kids or grandkids involved in some sport or other activity. It's
    what we do.

    As I mentioned, I bring a milk crate to the game to stand on in order
    to be able to shoot over the chainlink fence instead of through it.
    This is a milk crate for those not familiar with them:
    http://milkcratedigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/black_milkcrate.jpg
    That may have looked silly at first, but several other photographers
    have asked to use it when their son or grandson was up at bat. Not so
    silly.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Jun 1, 2013
    #4
  5. Sandman

    Alfred Molon Guest

    In article <>, Sandman
    says...
    > But there is a reason why I bring a
    > D3s with a 70-200/2.8 lens there, it's because of the outstanding
    > performance of both the lens and the camera in ways the Sony NEX can't
    > match. I have no doubt that the NEX is a fine camera, but when it
    > comes to capture my kids in motion, it can't stack up to a real DSLR
    > camera with a quick lens.


    Sony has developed a sensor with on-sensor phase AF. That sensor will
    likely be available on a future NEX camera. Coupled with a fast lens,
    that new NEX should perform as well as a normal DSLR.

    But the point is that many not so knowledgeable people buy huge DSLRs
    which essentially are overkill for them. And then they always use them
    with the kit lens. These people would be better served with a more
    compact mirrorless camera (be it a NEX, m4/3 or Samsung NX).
    --

    Alfred Molon
    ------------------------------
    Olympus E-series DSLRs and micro 4/3 forum at
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/MyOlympus/
    http://myolympus.org/ photo sharing site
     
    Alfred Molon, Jun 1, 2013
    #5
  6. Sandman

    David Taylor Guest

    On 01/06/2013 09:04, Alfred Molon wrote:
    []
    > Sony has developed a sensor with on-sensor phase AF. That sensor will
    > likely be available on a future NEX camera. Coupled with a fast lens,
    > that new NEX should perform as well as a normal DSLR.


    Nikon already have something like this - perhaps it's Nikon's
    development perhaps it's purchased from Sony.

    > But the point is that many not so knowledgeable people buy huge DSLRs
    > which essentially are overkill for them. And then they always use them
    > with the kit lens. These people would be better served with a more
    > compact mirrorless camera (be it a NEX, m4/3 or Samsung NX).


    Having used both bridge cameras and DSLRs there really is no comparison
    in either the viewfinder or the operational speed. You can be much more
    precise in timing with a DSLR, and the multi-second gap in getting the
    view back in a bridge camera after taking makes tracking of fast moving
    objects at high zooms much more difficult. Do the CSC cameras also
    suffer from delay and poor EVFs?

    On the other hand, the larger zoom range of the bridge camera can make
    photos easy to get which would require very heavy and very bulky lenses
    on a DSLR or on a Sony NEX camera.

    My own feeling is that, for many people, a compact travel camera such as
    one from the Panasonic range would be quite adequate, and a bridge
    camera for those needing slightly more. The higher image quality from
    the DSLR-sized sensor simply isn't needed, although the higher
    sensitivity might be welcomed for indoor shooting.
    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
     
    David Taylor, Jun 1, 2013
    #6
  7. Sandman

    Sandman Guest

    In article <>,
    Alfred Molon <> wrote:

    > > But there is a reason why I bring a
    > > D3s with a 70-200/2.8 lens there, it's because of the outstanding
    > > performance of both the lens and the camera in ways the Sony NEX can't
    > > match. I have no doubt that the NEX is a fine camera, but when it
    > > comes to capture my kids in motion, it can't stack up to a real DSLR
    > > camera with a quick lens.

    >
    > Sony has developed a sensor with on-sensor phase AF. That sensor will
    > likely be available on a future NEX camera. Coupled with a fast lens,
    > that new NEX should perform as well as a normal DSLR.


    Well, they didn't wait until this future for the ads :)

    Plus, as of now, there are not fast superzoom lenses for the NEX (as far
    as I know) and definitely not 70-200/2.8 equivalent, which is what you
    would want to use when capturing kids in motion from the sidelines.

    And even if they did develop a fast superzoom lens, it would be as big
    as cumbersome as the gear they're making fun of in these videos, so...

    > But the point is that many not so knowledgeable people buy huge DSLRs
    > which essentially are overkill for them.


    That I agree with, and also mentioned in my post.

    > And then they always use them with the kit lens. These people would
    > be better served with a more compact mirrorless camera (be it a NEX,
    > m4/3 or Samsung NX).


    Agree 100%. Although the videos doesn't really make fun of people with
    kit lenses, but rather the superzoom 70-200 or 150-500 lenses for tasks
    that doesn't require it. Like this one:

    <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rnaIFjJkuzQ>

    Even if you're a clueless DSLR user, you wouldn't be using a huge
    superzoom for selfshots. It's satire, I know, but I am trying to find
    sanity in the madness :)



    --
    Sandman[.net]
     
    Sandman, Jun 1, 2013
    #7
  8. Sandman

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    > In article <>, Sandman
    > says...
    > > But there is a reason why I bring a
    > > D3s with a 70-200/2.8 lens there, it's because of the outstanding
    > > performance of both the lens and the camera in ways the Sony NEX can't
    > > match. I have no doubt that the NEX is a fine camera, but when it
    > > comes to capture my kids in motion, it can't stack up to a real DSLR
    > > camera with a quick lens.

    >
    > Sony has developed a sensor with on-sensor phase AF. That sensor will
    > likely be available on a future NEX camera. Coupled with a fast lens,
    > that new NEX should perform as well as a normal DSLR.
    >
    > But the point is that many not so knowledgeable people buy huge DSLRs
    > which essentially are overkill for them. And then they always use them
    > with the kit lens. These people would be better served with a more
    > compact mirrorless camera (be it a NEX, m4/3 or Samsung NX).


    I don't know that a "more compact mirrorless camera" would serve them
    any better than the DSLR. If it was substantially cheaper and had an
    eye-level finder built in it might serve them as well but so far I'm not
    seeing the mirrorless coming in at any kind of significant cost saving.

    What would serve many of them better is a good bridge camera.
     
    J. Clarke, Jun 1, 2013
    #8
  9. Sandman

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <kocf2j$lj7$>, david-
    d says...
    >
    > On 01/06/2013 09:04, Alfred Molon wrote:
    > []
    > > Sony has developed a sensor with on-sensor phase AF. That sensor will
    > > likely be available on a future NEX camera. Coupled with a fast lens,
    > > that new NEX should perform as well as a normal DSLR.

    >
    > Nikon already have something like this - perhaps it's Nikon's
    > development perhaps it's purchased from Sony.
    >
    > > But the point is that many not so knowledgeable people buy huge DSLRs
    > > which essentially are overkill for them. And then they always use them
    > > with the kit lens. These people would be better served with a more
    > > compact mirrorless camera (be it a NEX, m4/3 or Samsung NX).

    >
    > Having used both bridge cameras and DSLRs there really is no comparison
    > in either the viewfinder or the operational speed. You can be much more
    > precise in timing with a DSLR, and the multi-second gap in getting the
    > view back in a bridge camera after taking makes tracking of fast moving
    > objects at high zooms much more difficult. Do the CSC cameras also
    > suffer from delay and poor EVFs?
    >
    > On the other hand, the larger zoom range of the bridge camera can make
    > photos easy to get which would require very heavy and very bulky lenses
    > on a DSLR or on a Sony NEX camera.
    >
    > My own feeling is that, for many people, a compact travel camera such as
    > one from the Panasonic range would be quite adequate, and a bridge
    > camera for those needing slightly more. The higher image quality from
    > the DSLR-sized sensor simply isn't needed, although the higher
    > sensitivity might be welcomed for indoor shooting.


    In my case I bought the SLR because I was losing shots to shutter lag.
    Now I use it almost exclusively in a studio so the higher sensitivity
    matters, but the thing that makes is almost irreplaceable is the 65mm
    MP-E that is tack-sharp at 5x magnification.
     
    J. Clarke, Jun 1, 2013
    #9
  10. Sandman

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Fri, 31 May 2013 14:01:44 +0200, Sandman <> wrote:
    : In article <>,
    : Tony Cooper <> wrote:
    :
    : > On 31 May 2013 09:27:40 GMT, Sandman <> wrote:
    : >
    : > >As a DSLR-owner I can totally identify with bringing a large camera to
    : > >my kids sporting events and that may end up making me look a bit
    : > >silly,
    : >
    : > I have two grandsons who play in "Babe Ruth" baseball leagues. And,
    : > yes, I lug my Nikon to all the games. Because of the fences around
    : > the field, I bring a milk crate to stand on so I can shoot over -
    : > instead of through - the chain link fence.
    : >
    : > Most of the other parents/grandparents use their phones or iPads to
    : > take photos. One mother has a Nikon with a "Vari-Angle" viewfinder
    : > that allows her to hold the camera over her head, and over the fence,
    : > and shoot.
    : >
    : > Several of the parents - even ones using phone and pad cameras - have
    : > asked me to take photographs of their kids in action and email the
    : > results to them. I do so, of course.
    : >
    : > I've never felt silly in this activity.
    :
    : Me neitehr, but perhaps others have thought you looked silly? I think
    : that's the point of the ads anyway. The dad is just taking pictures, but
    : to other's he is looking silly.
    :
    : The irony, to me, is that him looking silly is based more on how he
    : moves and skips about rather than what type of camera he is using, and
    : when switching to the NEX, he looks exactly as silly.

    Two points:

    Those Sony ads were obviously staged.

    I know exactly how silly I look, lugging around a DSLR (especially shooting
    events, where I usually lug two of them, complete with two battery packs on my
    belt). If it bothers you to look silly, you have no business dabbling in
    serious photography. Stick to your cell phone camera, and look like a yokel
    instead of a jackass. ;^)

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 1, 2013
    #10
  11. Sandman

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Fri, 31 May 2013 21:10:39 -0400, Tony Cooper <>
    wrote:
    :
    : As I mentioned, I bring a milk crate to the game to stand on in order
    : to be able to shoot over the chainlink fence instead of through it.
    : This is a milk crate for those not familiar with them:
    : http://milkcratedigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/black_milkcrate.jpg
    : That may have looked silly at first, but several other photographers
    : have asked to use it when their son or grandson was up at bat. Not so
    : silly.

    A crate identical to that one is three feet away from me as I type this. I
    didn't realize it's strong enough to stand on. Live a lot, learn a little.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 1, 2013
    #11
  12. Sandman

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2013.06.01 12:49 , Robert Coe wrote:

    > Those Sony ads were obviously staged.


    > If it bothers you to look silly, you have no business dabbling in
    > serious photography. Stick to your cell phone camera, and look like a yokel
    > instead of a jackass. ;^)


    Perfectly put.

    People shooting with an iPhone look cool.

    Of course the photos usually don't.

    As to being a DSLR jackass, if one digs around these groups one will
    find a discussion about shooting vests which could point out a really
    serious, maybe professional, photographer or be the height of wannabeism.

    I know a few local clubs where some members sport shooting jackets when
    out and about - and I've seen their many excellent photos as well. I
    guess looking like a jackass doesn't equate to bad photos.

    --
    "A Canadian is someone who knows how to have sex in a canoe."
    -Pierre Berton
     
    Alan Browne, Jun 1, 2013
    #12
  13. Sandman

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2013.06.01 12:57 , Robert Coe wrote:
    > On Fri, 31 May 2013 21:10:39 -0400, Tony Cooper <>
    > wrote:
    > :
    > : As I mentioned, I bring a milk crate to the game to stand on in order
    > : to be able to shoot over the chainlink fence instead of through it.
    > : This is a milk crate for those not familiar with them:
    > : http://milkcratedigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/black_milkcrate.jpg
    > : That may have looked silly at first, but several other photographers
    > : have asked to use it when their son or grandson was up at bat. Not so
    > : silly.
    >
    > A crate identical to that one is three feet away from me as I type this. I
    > didn't realize it's strong enough to stand on. Live a lot, learn a little.


    Those things are very strong and pretty light.

    And a perfect size to store and carry LP's too.


    --
    "A Canadian is someone who knows how to have sex in a canoe."
    -Pierre Berton
     
    Alan Browne, Jun 1, 2013
    #13
  14. Sandman

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Sat, 01 Jun 2013 12:57:35 -0400, Robert Coe <> wrote:

    >On Fri, 31 May 2013 21:10:39 -0400, Tony Cooper <>
    >wrote:
    >:
    >: As I mentioned, I bring a milk crate to the game to stand on in order
    >: to be able to shoot over the chainlink fence instead of through it.
    >: This is a milk crate for those not familiar with them:
    >: http://milkcratedigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/black_milkcrate.jpg
    >: That may have looked silly at first, but several other photographers
    >: have asked to use it when their son or grandson was up at bat. Not so
    >: silly.
    >
    >A crate identical to that one is three feet away from me as I type this. I
    >didn't realize it's strong enough to stand on. Live a lot, learn a little.
    >

    The kind you buy at Target for home storage isn't. The one you steal
    from a grocery store is.
    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Jun 1, 2013
    #14
  15. Sandman

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sat, 01 Jun 2013 13:33:25 -0400, Tony Cooper <>
    wrote:
    : On Sat, 01 Jun 2013 12:57:35 -0400, Robert Coe <> wrote:
    :
    : >On Fri, 31 May 2013 21:10:39 -0400, Tony Cooper <>
    : >wrote:
    : >:
    : >: As I mentioned, I bring a milk crate to the game to stand on in order
    : >: to be able to shoot over the chainlink fence instead of through it.
    : >: This is a milk crate for those not familiar with them:
    : >: http://milkcratedigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/black_milkcrate.jpg
    : >: That may have looked silly at first, but several other photographers
    : >: have asked to use it when their son or grandson was up at bat. Not so
    : >: silly.
    : >
    : >A crate identical to that one is three feet away from me as I type this. I
    : >didn't realize it's strong enough to stand on. Live a lot, learn a little.
    : >
    : The kind you buy at Target for home storage isn't. The one you steal
    : from a grocery store is.

    My wife got that one, and others like it, from Duluth Trading Co., a yuppie
    mail-order house. And she says yes, they claim it's plenty strong to stand on.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 1, 2013
    #15
  16. Sandman

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Robert Coe
    <> wrote:

    > Those Sony ads were obviously staged.


    all ads are staged.
     
    nospam, Jun 1, 2013
    #16
  17. Sandman

    Savageduck Guest

    On 2013-06-01 10:07:08 -0700, Alan Browne
    <> said:

    > On 2013.06.01 12:49 , Robert Coe wrote:
    >
    >> Those Sony ads were obviously staged.

    >
    >> If it bothers you to look silly, you have no business dabbling in
    >> serious photography. Stick to your cell phone camera, and look like a yokel
    >> instead of a jackass. ;^)

    >
    > Perfectly put.
    >
    > People shooting with an iPhone look cool.


    Naah! They look like they need a real camera.

    > Of course the photos usually don't.


    The photos usually look like the really did need a real camera.

    > As to being a DSLR jackass, if one digs around these groups one will
    > find a discussion about shooting vests which could point out a really
    > serious, maybe professional, photographer or be the height of
    > wannabeism.
    >
    > I know a few local clubs where some members sport shooting jackets when
    > out and about - and I've seen their many excellent photos as well. I
    > guess looking like a jackass doesn't equate to bad photos.


    There is nothing which makes an image shooter/snappist look like a
    jackass than holding a camera phone, or compact digital, overhead, or
    at arms length, to shoot in a crowd at a subject impossible to find.


    --
    Regards,

    Savageduck
     
    Savageduck, Jun 1, 2013
    #17
  18. Sandman

    Savageduck Guest

    On 2013-06-01 10:11:03 -0700, Alan Browne
    <> said:

    > On 2013.06.01 12:57 , Robert Coe wrote:
    >> On Fri, 31 May 2013 21:10:39 -0400, Tony Cooper <>
    >> wrote:
    >> :
    >> : As I mentioned, I bring a milk crate to the game to stand on in order
    >> : to be able to shoot over the chainlink fence instead of through it.
    >> : This is a milk crate for those not familiar with them:
    >> : http://milkcratedigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/black_milkcrate.jpg
    >> : That may have looked silly at first, but several other photographers
    >> : have asked to use it when their son or grandson was up at bat. Not so
    >> : silly.
    >>
    >> A crate identical to that one is three feet away from me as I type this. I
    >> didn't realize it's strong enough to stand on. Live a lot, learn a little.

    >
    > Those things are very strong and pretty light.


    Real milk crates, yes, those sold by Staples as "file boxes", no.

    > And a perfect size to store and carry LP's too.



    --
    Regards,

    Savageduck
     
    Savageduck, Jun 1, 2013
    #18
  19. Sandman

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    > On Sat, 01 Jun 2013 13:33:25 -0400, Tony Cooper <>
    > wrote:
    > : On Sat, 01 Jun 2013 12:57:35 -0400, Robert Coe <> wrote:
    > :
    > : >On Fri, 31 May 2013 21:10:39 -0400, Tony Cooper <>
    > : >wrote:
    > : >:
    > : >: As I mentioned, I bring a milk crate to the game to stand on in order
    > : >: to be able to shoot over the chainlink fence instead of through it.
    > : >: This is a milk crate for those not familiar with them:
    > : >: http://milkcratedigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/black_milkcrate.jpg
    > : >: That may have looked silly at first, but several other photographers
    > : >: have asked to use it when their son or grandson was up at bat. Not so
    > : >: silly.
    > : >
    > : >A crate identical to that one is three feet away from me as I type this. I
    > : >didn't realize it's strong enough to stand on. Live a lot, learn a little.
    > : >
    > : The kind you buy at Target for home storage isn't. The one you steal
    > : from a grocery store is.
    >
    > My wife got that one, and others like it, from Duluth Trading Co., a yuppie
    > mail-order house. And she says yes, they claim it's plenty strong to stand on.
    >
    > Bob


    While we're on the topic of impromptu steps, I'll tell you a little
    trick that works surprisingly well. You need a corrugated-cardboard box
    of whatever height you need (I've never done this with one that was over
    about 16 inches square) and a piece of plywood a little bigger than the
    box. Lay the plywood on the box and stand on it. This works fine with
    my nearly 300 pounds. Don't try it if the surface on which the box
    rests is wet or if the cardboard is wet and if the surface below is
    uneven use a second piece of plywood.

    Be careful in putting your weight on it in case you have a defective
    box.

    The idea is that as long as you have the weight distributed evenly
    around the perimeter the cardboard won't buckle or collapse and so will
    hold the load.

    Obviously not convenient if you don't have a corrugate box and a piece
    of plywood handy, but if you do . . .
     
    J. Clarke, Jun 1, 2013
    #19
  20. Sandman

    Eric Stevens Guest

    On Sat, 1 Jun 2013 13:17:18 -0700, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2013-06-01 10:07:08 -0700, Alan Browne
    ><> said:
    >
    >> On 2013.06.01 12:49 , Robert Coe wrote:
    >>
    >>> Those Sony ads were obviously staged.

    >>
    >>> If it bothers you to look silly, you have no business dabbling in
    >>> serious photography. Stick to your cell phone camera, and look like a yokel
    >>> instead of a jackass. ;^)

    >>
    >> Perfectly put.
    >>
    >> People shooting with an iPhone look cool.

    >
    >Naah! They look like they need a real camera.
    >
    >> Of course the photos usually don't.

    >
    >The photos usually look like the really did need a real camera.
    >
    >> As to being a DSLR jackass, if one digs around these groups one will
    >> find a discussion about shooting vests which could point out a really
    >> serious, maybe professional, photographer or be the height of
    >> wannabeism.
    >>
    >> I know a few local clubs where some members sport shooting jackets when
    >> out and about - and I've seen their many excellent photos as well. I
    >> guess looking like a jackass doesn't equate to bad photos.

    >
    >There is nothing which makes an image shooter/snappist look like a
    >jackass than holding a camera phone, or compact digital, overhead, or
    >at arms length, to shoot in a crowd at a subject impossible to find.


    I've done that on a number of occasions, even using a monopod and a
    cable release. I've even done it the other way holding the camera
    upside down at ground level (more tyically on my shoe) to get a shot
    from a different point of view. It usually needs a number of shots to
    get the zoom and framing right but, so what, it's digital. :)
    --

    Regards,

    Eric Stevens
     
    Eric Stevens, Jun 2, 2013
    #20
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