Durst Laborator

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Alparslan, May 16, 2004.

  1. Alparslan

    Alparslan Guest

    Hi,

    I have recently purchased a durst laborator 1200 for a very reasonable
    price. It came with the works. I am very exited. I checked the alignment
    with the verselab laser aligner tool and it was perfect side to side and
    needed adjustment for vertically. I have mostly figured out all the knobs
    and other bits but also would like to make sure I do not miss anything there
    is to know about this enlarger. This goes for alignment too.

    I onder if anyone could point me a link where I can get info regarding the
    issues I mentioned or where I can find an on-line manual.

    Regards.
     
    Alparslan, May 16, 2004
    #1
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  2. Alparslan

    Nick Zentena Guest


    Durst will likely mail you one for free. They sent me one for a 1000 and
    that hasn't been made for at least 25 years.

    Nick
     
    Nick Zentena, May 16, 2004
    #2
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  3. When I hauled my L1000 home, it took about five minutes
    to figure out what the knobs did. What do you need a
    manual for?

    This *was* my first "real" enlarger, by the way. It
    came with a CLS450 dichroic head, the digital timer,
    negative carriers and mixing boxes for 35mm, 6x6 and
    4x5, and lenses to match. I never did find a good way
    to do 6x7 with it, but got a good deal on a Saunders/LPL
    670DXL, also with all the trimmings.

    C'mon, folks, hurry! Go digital! Digital is wonderful.
    Really. Once you go digital you'll never look back.
    Honest. Just let me know when you do, so I can buy
    your darkroom stuff really cheap. :)

    Laura Halliday VE7LDH "Que les nuages soient notre
    Grid: CN89mg pied a terre..."
    ICBM: 49 16.05 N 122 56.92 W - Hospital/Shafte
     
    Laura Halliday, May 17, 2004
    #3
  4. When I hauled my L1000 home, it took about five minutes
    to figure out what the knobs did. What do you need a
    manual for?

    This *was* my first "real" enlarger, by the way. It
    came with a CLS450 dichroic head, the digital timer,
    negative carriers and mixing boxes for 35mm, 6x6 and
    4x5, and lenses to match. I never did find a good way
    to do 6x7 with it, but got a good deal on a Saunders/LPL
    670DXL, also with all the trimmings.

    C'mon, folks, hurry! Go digital! Digital is wonderful.
    Really. Once you go digital you'll never look back.
    Honest. Just let me know when you do, so I can buy
    your darkroom stuff really cheap. :)

    Laura Halliday VE7LDH "Que les nuages soient notre
    Grid: CN89mg pied a terre..."
    ICBM: 49 16.05 N 122 56.92 W - Hospital/Shafte
     
    Laura Halliday, May 17, 2004
    #4
  5. Alparslan

    Nick Zentena Guest

    Even with the manual I still don't know the proper name for the type of
    negative carrier it uses. Or for that matter the lenboards. If it hadn't
    been for some posting in the google archives of this group I'd never been
    able to figure out which recessed board it needed. That's with the manual-)
    I've got the 401 Mark II head. 35mm and 6x7 carriers. All using the 4x5
    light box.



    Nick
     
    Nick Zentena, May 17, 2004
    #5
  6. Alparslan

    Nick Zentena Guest


    BTW I made a carrier for 4x5 out of black matt board. It works. 6x7 with
    the smaller openning should be even easier.

    Nick
     
    Nick Zentena, May 17, 2004
    #6
  7. Alparslan

    David Starr Guest

    On 16 May 2004 20:48:03 -0700, (Laura Halliday)
    wrote:
    L, also with all the trimmings.
    Uhh.... Please go to the rear of the line. I's a long one, btw. :)


    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Professional Shop Rat: 14,328 days in a GM plant.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
     
    David Starr, May 17, 2004
    #7

  8. The US distributer is Jobo. They have some information on their website. Their
    page about the L1200 lists the accessories that are currently available:
    http://www.jobo-usa.com/products/durst_l1200.htm, including the somewhat
    peculiar names that Durst uses.

    They also have a FAQ at http://www.jobo-usa.com/faq/faqfrontpage.htm

    There isn't much in the manual that is both non-obvious and not in the webpages
    I listed.

    --Michael
     
    Michael Briggs, May 27, 2004
    #8
  9. Alparslan

    Alparslan Guest

    snipped

    I would like to know by how much one density filter unit will change the
    exposure time when everything else is constant.
     
    Alparslan, May 27, 2004
    #9
  10. Alparslan

    Mike King Guest

    Durst is unique, their filter units are supposed to be equivalent to
    logarithmic units. In other words 30M+30Y+30C= ND 0.30. In practice I
    think you'll find that each paper has different speeds for different
    emulsion layers and that emulsion layers are not sensitive to one color of
    light (Bertram Miller calls this arasters (sp?)) so in practice a change of
    say 30M will not mean a one f-stop change. However, if you add 30 to all
    three filters you will have approximately a one f-stop change in exposure.

    Much easier to buy a good analyzer and learn to print from what is sometimes
    known as a calibrated contact sheet.
     
    Mike King, May 29, 2004
    #10
  11. Durst uses decimal density units, so 30 is really 0.30, which is a factor of
    two. Reading Kodak's literature, Kodak seems to use the same units, but
    everyone agrees that the industry has two different units for enlargers, which
    are usually named after Kodak and Durst.

    Your question isn't very clear. Are you talking about one of the color filters,
    or the neutral density filter that some Durst heads have? Graded contrast B+W
    paper, variable contrast B+W paper or color paper? The ND filter is easy for
    all paper types.... ND 30 will halve the light reaching the paper.

    For variable contrast paper, there are various tables, usually from the paper
    manufacturer. For example, if you search around on the Ilford website, there is
    a pdf file "Contrast Control" that has tables for Ilford papers.

    --Michael
     
    Michael Briggs, May 30, 2004
    #11
  12. Alparslan

    Alparslan Guest

    Thank you Michael and Mike.

    I have the CLS500 color head and it has a density filter along with the
    three color filters. I do B&W work ( not by profession). The density filter
    really helps when I get too short exposure times. I use multi grade ilford
    paper and the instructions that come with it are very clear about the paper
    speed for different grades. Moreover, there is a very useful chart in the
    instruction sheet showing the two filter method by which it is possible to
    keep the exposure time constant when changing color filters to go from one
    grade to another. But this is not what I was talking about. It is the
    density filter the Durst has. It goes up to 60 units and it means I guess, 2
    stops.
    regards
    Alparslan
     
    Alparslan, May 31, 2004
    #12
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