Dust becomming a major DSLR issue?

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by RichA, Mar 10, 2005.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    I notice they are now selling $2/ea q-tips for removing dust
    from the sensor windows. Is this becomming a major issue
    for DSLR owners and does the Olympus system for removing it
    actually work well?
    -Rich
     
    RichA, Mar 10, 2005
    #1
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  2. RichA

    Sheldon Guest

    There are many way's to remove dust from a dslr sensor, but a q-tip ain't
    one of em. I don't think the problem is any worse than with any other
    camera that has interchangeable lenses, you just have to be a lot more
    careful since you are dealing with an image sensor that can be easily(?)
    scratched.
     
    Sheldon, Mar 11, 2005
    #2
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  3. RichA

    Stacey Guest

    Yes it does. E1 users with lots of time and field lens changes say they
    still have yet to have any dust issues.
     
    Stacey, Mar 11, 2005
    #3
  4. Actually, I think the problem *is* a lot worse than in film SLRs.

    In a film SLR, a *new* piece of film is pulled out of the cassette for
    each picture; any dust that was deposited on the previous piece of
    film is wound up in the roll, and with luck comes off in the felt when
    the film is rewound.

    Also, the CCD sensor develops a static charge which actually
    *attracts* dust.

    Of course, digital doesn't ever get those awful scratches through a
    whole roll of film because a piece of grit got trapped in the felt
    light-trap in the cassette, either.
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Mar 11, 2005
    #4
  5. RichA

    Alan Browne Guest

    Stacey wrote:

    That's great. I wished Minolta had adopted the same anti-dust strategy
    (licence it from Oly in exchange for a licence to use the Minolta A-S,
    perhaps [if indeed it needs to be licenced]).

    Looking at the Maxxum 7D, they've put in a substantially smaller mirror
    than in the Maxxum 7 so there's a lot of free space for dust to get at
    the sensor.

    Cheers,
    Alan.
     
    Alan Browne, Mar 11, 2005
    #5
  6. RichA

    Stacey Guest


    I'll bet panasonic is going to use this technology when they release their
    dSLR's. It's sure nice being able to change lenses just like on a film
    camera without having to worry about this.
     
    Stacey, Mar 11, 2005
    #6
  7. RichA

    Lourens Smak Guest

    It does; my E1 is now >18.000 clicks (3-lens kit), and I have yet to see
    the first dust-speck... I do take care of my equipment but I basically
    change lenses just like I did with film.

    Lourens
     
    Lourens Smak, Mar 11, 2005
    #7
  8. RichA

    Owamanga Guest

    Lets face it, they are going to have to do something amazing to
    attempt any serious competition with Nikon, Canon, Minolta and
    Olympus.

    Anyway, you *should* have been worrying about dust and other
    contaminants getting into the film area. The shutter is relatively
    delicate and will last longer if it doesn't get gummed up.
     
    Owamanga, Mar 11, 2005
    #8
  9. RichA

    Charle Guest

    Is there any proof that there is a static charge formed on the CCD or CMOs
    sensors that attract dust. I think is just another myth started from
    somewhere. It takes A BIG voltage potencial to attract a small dust
    partical to an object . I bet there is at the most 5 volts working in the
    sensor and at that its not on the front of it. If there were 500 volts maby
    I would beleave it.
     
    Charle, Mar 11, 2005
    #9
  10. the E-1), I recall reading articles where Minolta was saying the movement
    of the anti-shake sensor was incompatible with the movement used for dust
    cleaning in the Olympus cameras. And yes, as I understand it, both companies
    have patents on their methods (KM on AS, Oly on dust-busting).
     
    Michael Meissner, Mar 11, 2005
    #10
  11. RichA

    C J Campbell Guest

    The real issue is why camera manufacturers discourage people from cleaning
    their sensors. Now we see that a simple cosmetics brush is all that is
    needed to do the job.

    http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/How_to/a_Brush_Your_Sensor/a_Brush_Your_Sensor.html

    http://makeashorterlink.com/?F22E256AA
     
    C J Campbell, Mar 11, 2005
    #11
  12. RichA

    Charlie Self Guest

    cleaning
    their sensors. Now we see that a simple cosmetics brush is all that is
    needed to do the job.

    http://194.100.88.243/petteri/­pont/How_to/a_Brush_Your_Senso­r/a_Brush....
    <<

    What I am curious about is what, exactly, we are cleaning. I've
    variously been told that there is a low pass filter on top of the
    sensor (making scratches much less of a problem), and/or a glass
    protective plate (doing the same). Yet there is a lot of worry about
    scratching--most of us are not dragging carborundum or diamond dust off
    our sensors, I'd think.
     
    Charlie Self, Mar 11, 2005
    #12
  13. RichA

    stator Guest

    try turning the anti-shake on and shake the hell outta tha body...hehe

    Joe
     
    stator, Mar 11, 2005
    #13
  14. RichA

    Alan Browne Guest


    I await your experimental results...

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Mar 11, 2005
    #14
  15. RichA

    Alan Adrian Guest

    What I am curious about is what, exactly, we are cleaning. I've
    variously been told that there is a low pass filter on top of the
    sensor (making scratches much less of a problem), and/or a glass
    protective plate (doing the same). Yet there is a lot of worry about
    scratching--most of us are not dragging carborundum or diamond dust off
    our sensors, I'd think.

    Scratching the AA filter (and I believe all CCD and CMOS sensors have them
    (but for the Astro mods)) would be just as critical an event as scratching
    the sensor. Depending on exactly what the outermost coating is made from,
    and how hard it is, would determine how easy it is to scratch. I'm pretty
    sure you are touching something softer than glass in all cases. It is
    possible that they make the outer coat of some scratch resistive material
    though.. There are cases of people reporting that they've managed to ruin
    the sensor by cleaning it though... so whatever's on there isn't
    indestructible.

    The reasons they prohibit invasive cleaning by the owner IMHO is because
    they have no control over how the client does it... It's easy to say "I
    followed directions and when I was done there was this big scratch in
    there..."... and it's easy to say "you must have violated your warrantee
    because you managed to touch the sensor in order to make a scratch on
    it"....

    Al...
     
    Alan Adrian, Mar 11, 2005
    #15
  16. RichA

    Owamanga Guest

    At least some of the Nikon filters are made of LiNo, which is
    extremely hard - similar to Quartz crystal. I don't know exactly what
    on which camera, or what other manufacturers are doing.
    By scratching it?

    It seems to me the bigger problem is introducing a foreign
    contaminate, which would just make the problem worse.
    Yep.
     
    Owamanga, Mar 11, 2005
    #16
  17. RichA

    Charlie Self Guest

    Alan Adrian states:them
    (but for the Astro mods)) would be just as critical an event as
    scratching
    the sensor. Depending on exactly what the outermost coating is made
    from,
    and how hard it is, would determine how easy it is to scratch. I'm
    pretty
    sure you are touching something softer than glass in all cases. It is
    possible that they make the outer coat of some scratch resistive
    material
    though.. There are cases of people reporting that they've managed to
    ruin
    the sensor by cleaning it though... so whatever's on there isn't
    indestructible.


    The reasons they prohibit invasive cleaning by the owner IMHO is
    because
    they have no control over how the client does it... It's easy to say "I

    followed directions and when I was done there was this big scratch in
    there..."... and it's easy to say "you must have violated your
    warrantee
    because you managed to touch the sensor in order to make a scratch on
    it".... <<

    I'm not sure what the material is, either, but...not all manufacturers
    "prohibit" "invasive" cleaning. Pentax provides pretty good directions
    for cleaning without using a brush--the kind of blower they show,
    though, is almost totally useless, IME. They don't say a thing about
    using Sensor Swabs, which I did late this morning. Worked a treat.

    Yeah, you can destroy the sensor or its covering with too rough
    handling. I doubt very much you can scratch it using a good, soft brush
    or a Sensor Swab and Eclipse, but, hey, some people can do damned near
    anything. I recall no statement about indestructibility: if quartz or
    glass is used, about the only thing likely to do any scratching is
    diamond or carborundum dust. I didn't write anything about any other
    kind of rough handling. It seems reasonable to supposed that a delicate
    touch is better than swinging a ball bat at the sensor, assuming you
    could get the bat into position.
     
    Charlie Self, Mar 11, 2005
    #17
  18. RichA

    RichA Guest

    It's the hardness of the anti-reflection coating on the window that
    matters, not the substrate.
    -Rich
     
    RichA, Mar 12, 2005
    #18
  19. RichA

    Paul Revere Guest

    Canon recommends turning off the camera to reduce static charge effect prior
    to removing lens.
     
    Paul Revere, Mar 12, 2005
    #19
  20. RichA

    Stacey Guest

    And would anyone change the lens with the camera turned on? I also doubt
    turning the camera off does anything about the surface charge on the
    sensor, sure doesn't seem to "decharge" a monitor/TV unless it's been off
    for a LONG time...
     
    Stacey, Mar 12, 2005
    #20
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