Dust is a HORROR I do NOT want to see again

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by RichA, May 9, 2007.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Three Nikons, 4 weeks, ALL developed sensor dust CLEARLY visible on
    their images. Four frigging weeks and MINIMAL lens changes in non-
    dust prone environments!! I used Olympus for over a year, nothing, no
    visible dust in images. Mark my words, working dust control systems
    will eventually find their way into all DSLRs, not just Olympus.
     
    RichA, May 9, 2007
    #1
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  2. RichA

    Mark² Guest

    Mark your words...for deletion?
    Now THERE'S a thought! :)
     
    Mark², May 9, 2007
    #2
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  3. What do you expect when you couple a consumer grade DX lens that can double
    for a set of bellows for your fireplace. Use pro lenses and the old Nikon
    will never suck in a grain of sand.







    Rita
     
    Rita Ä Berkowitz, May 10, 2007
    #3
  4. RichA

    John Smith Guest

    +

    You need to change your lenses in a baggie.. then, no problem.

    DP
     
    John Smith, May 10, 2007
    #4
  5. RichA

    Terry Austin Guest

    I think he masturbated on it. This is Trollboy RichA, after all.
     
    Terry Austin, May 10, 2007
    #5
  6. I've owned two DSLRs, serially, over 4.5 years so far. I have cleaned
    sensors three times total, I believe. I change lenses pretty often,
    just like I did with film (and I don't have anything like the 18-200mm
    that makes lens changes less tempting; in fact I'm using quite a few
    non-zoom lenses).

    So I don't know what you're on about.
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, May 10, 2007
    #6
  7. RichA

    frederick Guest

    You have something in common. He doesn't know what he's going on about
    either.
     
    frederick, May 10, 2007
    #7
  8. RichA

    babaloo Guest

    People who have not experienced Nikon sensor dust problems and believe the
    problem does not exist probably went marketing in Baghdad with John McCain
    and had a lovely time.
     
    babaloo, May 10, 2007
    #8
  9. My two DSLRs over those years were a Fuji S2 and now a Nikon D200.
    There's no special problem. If you do a lot of landscape work with big
    areas of sky shot at small apertures, you will have a lot more dust
    trouble than I do; I work mostly in dark rooms by available light, hence
    shooting at very large apertures with dark backgrounds, a situation
    which minimized the visibility of dust.

    I've done a lot of darkroom printing in my life, and a fair amount of
    scanning of slides/negs, and I spend a LOT more time cleaning up dust
    issues on those than I ever do with digital shots.

    So yeah, I'd say there is no "dust problem". There is a need to clean
    inside your camera occasionally, just as there was with film bodies, and
    in the darkroom, and sometimes a need to fix up shots afterwards.
    Overall this is *much* less of a problem than it was in the film world.
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, May 10, 2007
    #9
  10. Yep! And when all that fails they have this option, the NASC, to fall back
    on.

    <http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2006/sensor.htm>






    Rita
     
    Rita Ä Berkowitz, May 10, 2007
    #10
  11. I've had my D50 for over a year now. 1 sensor dust issue. No it wasn't
    a HORROR. it was easily remedied.
    Get a life Rich, the one you've got is driving you insane.

    Doc
     
    Dr Hfuhruhurr, May 10, 2007
    #11
  12. RichA

    tomm42 Guest


    Rich,
    16months with a D200 I blown out the sensor twice, one zoom 4 primes,
    and I keep changing them. Keep looking for dust and it is not there.
    The 18-200 is known as a bellows as Rita said, just not a well sealed
    lens. Keep caps on both sides of the lens, and you may want to keep
    the lenses in plastic bags in your case, I just use caps. I would only
    trust the black Nikon rear caps not the translucent bugger they seem
    to include on new lenses now.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, May 10, 2007
    #12
  13. RichA

    RichA Guest

    I never used that lens, only DXs and a couple D lenses. Whatever the
    result, with the Olympus it's
    not a case of some dust to deal with, or a lot of dust, it is ZERO
    dust issues, which is how it should be.
     
    RichA, May 10, 2007
    #13
  14. RichA

    tomm42 Guest


    Yeah, I haven't had to blow it out for 7 months, hardly a horror, the
    effort I have put into dust, you may as well say the horror of
    cleaning lenses. Just don't understand where the goobers come from
    that you need a solvent for (never had to deal with that). If you like
    Olympus that is fine, I couldn'r deal with even a smaller, denser
    sensor and Oh the horror of noise (just kidding). Frankly I feel
    better with a nice stable fixed sensor, that doesn't get much dust at
    all.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, May 10, 2007
    #14
  15. RichA

    tomm42 Guest


    Yeah, I haven't had to blow it out for 7 months, hardly a horror, the
    effort I have put into dust, you may as well say the horror of
    cleaning lenses. Just don't understand where the goobers come from
    that you need a solvent for (never had to deal with that). If you like
    Olympus that is fine, I couldn'r deal with even a smaller, denser
    sensor and Oh the horror of noise (just kidding). Frankly I feel
    better with a nice stable fixed sensor, that doesn't get much dust at
    all.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, May 10, 2007
    #15
  16. RichA

    Skinner1 Guest

    Then wouldn't it be logical to stay with the Olympus cameras?

    I mean I might be an amature and all but that would seem to make sense
    to me. Or is there some reason that you don't want to use only Olympus
    equipment?
     
    Skinner1, May 11, 2007
    #16
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