DVD capacity question

Discussion in 'Video Cameras' started by rovereab, May 30, 2004.

  1. rovereab

    Tony Morgan Guest

    I can do much better than that. I worked in the development team at
    Northern Telecom Data Systems at Hemel Hempstead developing the very
    first commercial/business client-server system (the Vienna system). The
    server was an 80286 machine running Microsoft Xenix (yes - Microsoft did
    then have a Unix-variant OS). The workstations were DOS 1.1 running on
    8080s with 128K memory (later upgraded to 384K). Green screens but for
    MDs secretaries a very expensive Nokia paper-white screen monitor option
    was soon introduced. Office Automation was initially
    Wordstar/Calcstar/Datastar - each of which would run on 64K of memory.
    The reason memory was upgraded was to allow Quadratron Q-Office to be
    able to be run on both client and servers. Networking was with another
    Microsoft product, MS-Net. Printers were Qume daisy-wheels - those
    things were guaranteed to keep the office girls awake :).

    All very high-tech :)
    He's also reputed to have said "there's no future in the Internet".
     
    Tony Morgan, Jun 3, 2004
    #81
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  2. rovereab

    Dave R Guest

    (Un)fortunately this is no longer true. The latest catalogue I received
    from Novatech had DVD burners for £50. When I think what I paid for mine
    last year! It's now obsolete, slow, and not worth selling.
     
    Dave R, Jun 3, 2004
    #82
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  3. rovereab

    Keith Laws Guest

    I speak from my own experience and that of others in my company. We use
    Access a lot and upgrading it is such a pain in the arse that we try not
    to unless it really has to be done for reason such as compatibility with
    a major customer.

    The actual tables and forms are not a problem, but as soon as you start
    coding then you will get problems if you upgrade later.
    Access can do that, to an extent. I think MS are quite open about what
    to worry about when doing an upgrade.
    Access cannot do that, full stop. (depending exactly which version you
    are going between)
    Sounds pretty typical of some large software houses actually.
    I am using 95 at work at the moment. We have access to a 2000 upgrade
    but the advice is not to do it if Access is a big part of your work as
    you will have problems with legacy databases, advice which some of my
    colleagues wish they had followed.
    --
    Keith Laws

    What's my solution?

    .....NOISE POLLUTION
     
    Keith Laws, Jun 3, 2004
    #83
  4. rovereab

    Keith Laws Guest

    I don't see how me pointing out that upgrading Access is not as
    straightforward as you seem to believe makes me either a liar or
    incompetent.



    --
    Keith Laws

    What's my solution?

    .....NOISE POLLUTION
     
    Keith Laws, Jun 4, 2004
    #84
  5. rovereab

    Jerry. Guest

    Perhaps you just need to correct the mistake and not dismiss the use of
    tape....
     
    Jerry., Jun 4, 2004
    #85
  6. rovereab

    Jerry. Guest

    You are putting up a very good argument......

    .....for....

    ........ archiving in analogue rather than digital - either tape or
    optical disc - if a recorded digital signal is so fragile !

    Remember that an optical disc relies on the laser beam being reflected by
    the disc, when disc's degrade that fails to happen correctly - result data
    loss.
     
    Jerry., Jun 4, 2004
    #86
  7. rovereab

    Tony Morgan Guest

    ISTM that upgrades of Access (as with many other applications) raise
    issues of *backward* compatibility rather than those of forward
    compatibility.

    Anyway its out of context for this newsgroup.
     
    Tony Morgan, Jun 4, 2004
    #87
  8. rovereab

    Keith Laws Guest

    For us its a case of databases that have code modules and macros in them
    just not working properly once they have gone through the upgrade
    process.

    Access is not like Word or Excel, it doesn't have filters to read/write
    older version's files, it does a wholesale upgrade to the data files to
    bring them in line with the new version.
    true
    --
    Keith Laws

    What's my solution?

    .....NOISE POLLUTION
     
    Keith Laws, Jun 4, 2004
    #88
  9. rovereab

    Jerry. Guest

    Unless you have all your tape logs on a Access data base that is!

    Grins, ducks and runs...
     
    Jerry., Jun 4, 2004
    #89
  10. rovereab

    Keith Laws Guest

    Given a high bandwidth analogue recorder that is not a problem.
    Not really, digital tapes have a higher coercivity than compact
    cassettes so they are less prone to print-through (or erasing due to
    being left on top of TVs for instance). Also the print through would
    have to be more than an echo, it would have to be strong enough to flip
    a 1 to a 0 or vice versa.

    --
    Keith Laws

    What's my solution?

    .....NOISE POLLUTION
     
    Keith Laws, Jun 5, 2004
    #90
  11. rovereab

    Jerry. Guest

    So you did not correct the mistake, you gave up !

    Just changing one list of problems for another is not sorting the problem.
     
    Jerry., Jun 5, 2004
    #91
  12. rovereab

    John Russell Guest

    I don't think PC users are completely to blame. Home users who don't have
    access to a central backup point via lan are left to use whatever there PC
    is equipped with. Once hard drive size's got beyond say 100mb, it was no
    longer feasable to backup using floppy. But did the manufacturers act
    resposibly and include an alternative? Once hard drives got to say 20 GB did
    Microsoft make data managment easier by making the OS install routine
    partition the disk? By now with +100gb disks being the norm software
    installers for anything other than hardware supporting apps should be
    looking to install on another partition than C!

    So the PC industry is largely to blame for not making data management and
    backup as important as it should be.
     
    John Russell, Jun 5, 2004
    #92
  13. rovereab

    Jerry. Guest

    Yet.

    Some of us don't have the
    Some of people don't have the time (nor can spare the money it would cost if
    things go wrong) to try out unproven technology.
    But it has not been proven viable, like tape, optical disc's have not been
    around long enough....
     
    Jerry., Jun 5, 2004
    #93
  14. rovereab

    Jerry. Guest

    Opps...
    That should read .......viable, unlike tape, optical disc's have not
    been......
     
    Jerry., Jun 5, 2004
    #94
  15. rovereab

    Tony Morgan Guest

    There we'll agree. How easy it would be to provide a utility to provide
    a backup facility with the options:

    1. Total backup of all but Documents and Settings.
    2. Incremental backup of all but Documents and Settings.
    3. Total backup of Documents and Settings (and nothing else)
    4. Incremental backup of Documents and Settings
    (and nothing else).

    All zipped, with default to CD-ROM (with option of resetting to DVD).

    And a little addendum to the documentation explaining what to do, and a
    sequence of how to restore using the various disk (sets). You could even
    dispense with the documentation and provide a Help with the utility.
    They could even auto-run the utility at the end of Windows installation,
    putting focus on (1) - though it would be better to run after
    application software was installed.

    At most, one or two man-days to implement.
     
    Tony Morgan, Jun 5, 2004
    #95
  16. rovereab

    John Russell Guest

    As a home PC user I only have access to whatever I fit to my own PC. I have
    gone through 3 tape back up systems, each of which failed. Prior to failure
    each system started to have read errors with tapes which had only been used
    5-10 times. I admit I was only paying about £150 for these drives but I
    consider that price to be the limit a home users would pay for a device
    which only does back-ups. Arguing that pro units would be more reliable is
    plain daft for home users. These tape systems have been the items of PC
    equipment to need replacment due to failure. When my last Travan tape deck
    died I decided to replace it with a recordable DVD drive.

    Since I believe in partioning hard drives and keeping essential software
    seperate from non essential software I can keep the size of backup downs as
    I only backup essential software. I use Drive Image to create temporary
    images on my large video drive and then copy them to DVD. Leaving the images
    on my video drive means I can return my main partitions to those baseline
    states in about 10 mins!
     
    John Russell, Jun 5, 2004
    #96
  17. rovereab

    Tony Morgan Guest

    Obviously that's fine for you - if you're happy with it. Backup strategy
    is only as good as it becomes after a disaster :)

    It's just that after a lot of years experience, I know that "new" is not
    always the best. I try, for instance, to avoid upgrading OS until SP1 is
    released.

    Time was when software was not released until it had been *extensively*
    beta-tested. These days software seems to be rushed out with no concern
    about stability and functionality. The really classic example is
    Pinnacle Studio 8 (which was released to "fix outstanding problems with
    Version 7"). It wasn't until twelve releases later (version 8.12) all
    seemed to be working as it should - then within a couple of months they
    released Version 9.
     
    Tony Morgan, Jun 5, 2004
    #97
  18. rovereab

    Tony Morgan Guest

    AFAICS the problem with that policy is that programs rely on registry
    entries, and if you have registry entries that aren't matched by the
    appropriate programs you can have trouble.
     
    Tony Morgan, Jun 5, 2004
    #98
  19. rovereab

    John Russell Guest

    And Users should be educated about why they need to make backupups. I've
    never had a head crash or drive fialure but that is the scenario which I
    always have in the back of my mind. Most users are more likely to have there
    whole PC nicked which is just as bad. I personally try out alot of software
    and don't care to trust "uninstall" or "System Restore" to return my system
    to it's previous state. I'd much rather using imaging software to return my
    system to it's previous state.Equally Imaging software can recreate your
    pc's software on a compleltely new PC if one was required due to fire, theft
    or failure.
     
    John Russell, Jun 5, 2004
    #99
  20. rovereab

    Jerry. Guest

    Hang on a moment you are talking about data backup / archiving, the original
    argument was about (digital) video files and using either a camcorder or VTR
    deck to record digital video back to tape. Are you saying that your camera /
    camcorder fails as above?
     
    Jerry., Jun 5, 2004
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