DVD - Half or full frame?

Discussion in 'Amateur Video Production' started by Commentator, Jan 26, 2004.

  1. Commentator

    Commentator Guest

    Someone told me today that many commercial DVD's are actually half frame,
    not full frame.

    Can anyone confirm / refute this?
     
    Commentator, Jan 26, 2004
    #1
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  2. Um, do they mean letterboxed versus full-frame or pan and
    scan?
     
    Neil Nadelman, Jan 27, 2004
    #2
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  3. Commentator

    Commentator Guest

    No he meant D2 (also known as 1/2 D1) instead of D1. CCE has switches for
    half horizontal and half vertical resolution.

     
    Commentator, Jan 28, 2004
    #3
  4. Oh, that. The answer is no, most commercially produced DVDs are at
    full D1 resolution. Any decent professional hardware MPEG encoder
    gives you 2 hours of fine output at D1, and the need for more space is
    normally handled by doing a dual-layer disc. I think the only people
    using 1/2 D1 are people like me who archive their old VHS tapes on
    DVD-R.

    I remember when DVD was first released. When the specs were
    published, I remember some people claiming that companies would use
    VCD-level 1/4 D1 resolution on releases because they wouldn't want to
    ake the trouble to remaster their old VHS masters for the new medium.
    These were also the same people who claimed that all the promises of
    bonus material, multiple soundtracks, and subtitles were just so much
    marketing hype, and that they would never come into common use.
     
    Neil Nadelman, Jan 28, 2004
    #4
  5. : full D1 resolution. Any decent professional hardware MPEG encoder
    : gives you 2 hours of fine output at D1, and the need for more space is

    Per DVD or per DVD-R?

    : normally handled by doing a dual-layer disc. I think the only people
    : using 1/2 D1 are people like me who archive their old VHS tapes on
    : DVD-R.

    Honestly, I just completed my 1st DVD from VHS that I'm pretty happy with.
    However, playing back the original VHS and DVD at the same time and flipping
    between them shows that original VHS still looks a bit better. I use TMPGenc
    CQ at 100% with 8250kbs bitrate. Sometimes I use just CBR at 8250kbs. And of
    course full D1. That way I can fit no more than 65 minutes per DVDR.

    : I remember when DVD was first released. When the specs were
    : published, I remember some people claiming that companies would use
    : VCD-level 1/4 D1 resolution on releases because they wouldn't want to

    If 1/4 D1 is used on DVD, does it support interlacing?

    --Leonid
     
    Leonid Makarovsky, Jan 31, 2004
    #5
  6. Per layer, i.e 2 hours for every 4.7 GB. Since a DVD-R is a
    single layer, I guess you could say it gives 2 hours of good video per
    DVD-R.
    Realizing how subjective the question is, how does the VHS
    tape look "better"? At the settings you're using, it should look
    about identical to the original video capture. May I ask what you're
    using to capture the VHS? If you apply processing filters to clean up
    the chroma noise and other analog artifacts of VHS, it could look
    better than the original.
    No. It's like a VCD, only with the ability to push the
    bitrate higher.
     
    Neil Nadelman, Jan 31, 2004
    #6
  7. Commentator

    Bariloche Guest

    According to my logic (correct me if I'm wrong), the CQ mode shall
    give you the same as the CBR mode, because 100% CQ mpeg2 can be around
    13000 kbps, IIRC. So what you get is not really 100%, but the best it
    can output at 8250 kbps. For true 100% CQ you would need overcome the
    max bitrate DVD standards, or step down to half-D1 resolution.
     
    Bariloche, Jan 31, 2004
    #7
  8. : Realizing how subjective the question is, how does the VHS
    : tape look "better"? At the settings you're using, it should look

    It looks a bit sharper. I still get the good results but as I said, I can
    see the difference between VHS and the resulting DVD-R.

    : about identical to the original video capture. May I ask what you're
    : using to capture the VHS?

    My hardware:
    FlyVideo 3000FM with Philips based chipset. I use Huffyuv 2.1 lossless codec to
    capture at 704x480 29.97fps.

    : If you apply processing filters to clean up
    : the chroma noise and other analog artifacts of VHS, it could look
    : better than the original.


    I don't use any filters. Just straight analog to digital conversion.

    --Leonid
     
    Leonid Makarovsky, Jan 31, 2004
    #8
  9. : According to my logic (correct me if I'm wrong), the CQ mode shall
    : give you the same as the CBR mode, because 100% CQ mpeg2 can be around
    : 13000 kbps, IIRC. So what you get is not really 100%, but the best it
    : can output at 8250 kbps. For true 100% CQ you would need overcome the
    : max bitrate DVD standards, or step down to half-D1 resolution.

    What's IIRC? I tried CBR at 8250kbs, and CQ of (8250kbs max) at 100% gave me
    a little less file size.

    So do you suggest just using CBR instead?

    --Leonid

    PS. I'm still learning.
     
    Leonid Makarovsky, Jan 31, 2004
    #9
  10. Commentator

    Bariloche Guest

    IIRC = If I Remember Correctly
    What's the bitrate you get in each case? It's a strange thing that
    100% CQ gets a smaller size, as it is supposed to be the absolute
    best. Perhaps Tmpgenc is padding in the CBR mode, to keep the bitrate
    as 8250 in any case.
     
    Bariloche, Feb 1, 2004
    #10
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