e-bay gone nuts

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by SteveJ, Jul 20, 2005.

  1. SteveJ

    SteveJ Guest

    Have you ever looked lately for a Camera on e-bay hopefully to find an
    individual selling a used one for a reduced price or almost new. Now the
    damn crook sellers have over several pages with the same listing over and
    over.
    I have seen over a full page of the same add listing a Canon 20D 50 listing
    long. E-bay to me was for selling or buying from a individual person
    wanting to sell or buy their items. I used to like to browse through the
    listings now I need to go through allot of crap just to find a listing that
    seems good to read through.
    To me if there is a listing repeated over a few times it should go to a
    e-bay store to keep the normal listings clean of all their crap. Most of
    them are crooks anyway.
     
    SteveJ, Jul 20, 2005
    #1
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  2. SteveJ

    Frank ess Guest

    Back when I knew about such things, eBay had a policy against any one
    seller having more than ten identical items listed at the same time.
    You could complain and eBay would close the extras, at least, and
    sometimes all of them. I bet that doesn't happen much these days.

    I agree that the joy of hunter-gathering on eBay is nearly gone. When
    sellers didn't know what they had, and buyers eagerly relieved them of
    the responsibility to find out, it was surely more fun. Actually it
    isn't that much different today, except everyone knows the value of
    everything, if they take the trouble to learn and use their tools and
    knowledge. But it isn't as much fun as often.
     
    Frank ess, Jul 20, 2005
    #2
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  3. SteveJ

    Canongirly Guest

    And have you actually complained to eBay about multiple listing sellers?
    (many are drop shippers...not crooks anyway).

    Or did you think you'd just whine your ass off here to a community who are
    made up of many individuals some or many of whom have the intelligence and
    sense to be able to use the filters on eBay to sift most of what you
    perceive to be a problem outta the way in the first place?

    As an aside I used to go to local general auctions to buy trinkets and stuff
    to sell on eBay (and Yahoo auctions before eBay acquired that). But I
    stopped when lots of other people without a clue and too much money started
    turning up and bidding up the prices, in many cases way over full retail
    price, for stuff at them. Isn't popularity a bitch?

    It is imo only a matter of time before manufacturers of globally available
    products will either cease to supply bricks and mortar stores or to devise a
    pricing structure whereby it doesn't matter where in the world you buy x
    product the cost is the same.

    In the meantime consumer is still king and if you have the ability, sense
    and funds to research your purchase probably bargains are still to be had.
    Whether by taking advantage of exchange rates or hard negotiating skills in
    a bricks and mortar store in your home country.
     
    Canongirly, Jul 20, 2005
    #3
  4. SteveJ

    RichA Guest

    Ebay is a hole. It's rife with fraud, shill bidding, crank deals,
    illegal sale of merchandise and Ebay could care less.
    Of course, the sleaze who run Ebay will NEVER divulge
    the level of this kind of thing in print, although anyone who takes
    the time can see it. Anyone who has done any level of deals on Ebay
    has seen it. Even seller/buyer ratings mean nothing because
    if you get burned, post a complaint comment, the other party can do it
    right back and there is nothing to stop them. Which means the crooks
    get off scott free.
    Ebay could EASILY develop or have software developed to root out much
    of this kind of thing, but they don't care!
    -Rich
     
    RichA, Jul 20, 2005
    #4
  5. SteveJ

    Canongirly Guest

    see those toys fly out the pram
     
    Canongirly, Jul 20, 2005
    #5
  6. SteveJ

    Siggy Guest

    In
    and not a single dSLR among them. ;-)

    Nigel_H
     
    Siggy, Jul 20, 2005
    #6
  7. SteveJ

    Cheesehead Guest

    I still find regular bargains.
    Got a black Pentax KX in good shape with a 135 lens for $45 a few weeks
    ago.
    Made other good purchases recently as well. And I sell a fair amount
    of stuff (dpconsult.com), as do my sons.

    We try to run a good business and treat customers fairly. A few
    mistakes have been made but I take care of my customers. Many have
    been return purchasers.

    It's too bad that the crooks don't realize the gold mine that is eBay.
    There's a lot of money to be made by being honest. I do $thousands per
    year and only part-time. It's worth every second.

    The large-scale scoundrels have been causing problems in the modern
    tech world ever since World Power Systems advertised fake computer
    deals in 1978/79. (Yes, I know they've been around longer than that.)
    Shutterbug, Computer Shopper, and so many others in print have run ads
    from the scoundrels. Just look in Popular Photography. It's no
    different than eBay. PP takes their money just the same.

    Be a smart shopper and you'll rarely lose.

    Collin
     
    Cheesehead, Jul 20, 2005
    #7
  8. SteveJ

    Father Kodak Guest

    Really? Can you cite at least one specific example, and perhaps some
    suggestions for how we can avoid these paskudnyaks.

    How can we detect it?
    Today they just announced record earnings. So they must be crying all
    the way to the bank.
     
    Father Kodak, Jul 21, 2005
    #8
  9. SteveJ

    RichA Guest

    I know of one case of shill bidding in the amount of $18,000 for a
    car, but I won't say who. The problem is proving it, the other party
    could very well claim they were interested in the product, they just
    didn't win the bidding. How can you attack it?
    Also, there have been noted cases of people selling things like Canon
    20Ds for $500 and I'm sure we put lots of stock into the legitimacy of
    those. Check out the DVDs for people selling DVD-Rs of popular movies.
    I somehow doubt it's legal.
    Bounce back and forth between the seller and who has bought from
    him before. Look for lots of bids on an item from accounts that were
    just set up and have no history. It's obviously not a guaranteed way
    of ferreting out the frauds, but it allows you to avoid some that may
    be more obvious than others.
    I think the key indicator of any fraud is someone selling something
    for vastly less than others are, why would someone give something away
    when that item's history dictates it will bring much more?
    Keep and eye on the "buy it now" prices.
    They do very well, and they do not want to rock the boat
    when it comes to their image so don't expect any divulging of fraud
    figures.
    -Rich
     
    RichA, Jul 21, 2005
    #9
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