Elan 7 kits, any good?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Bob, Sep 25, 2003.

  1. Bob

    Bob Guest

    After a lot of help and advice from people on these groups, I've
    decided to buy a Canon Elan 7. My question is, are the lenses in these
    kits any good, or should I just buy the body of the camera and invest
    in a better lense? For example, I'm looking at a kit for $624.00 that
    includes the body and 2 Canon lenses. A 28-90 EF and a 75-300 EF III.
    I just don't know if these are Canon's throw away lenses and not worth
    the price. Here is the website:

    http://www.digitalfotoclub.com/sc/main_item.asp?id=757226053

    I'm obviously just a beginner and these lenses may be fine for me, but
    on the other hand I don't want to invest money in something I will
    have to upgrade in 6 or so months.

    By the way, thanks to everyone for all the past, present and future
    help. I've learned more than I could ever have imagined in the last
    couple of days about cameras. Thanks again.

    Bob
     
    Bob, Sep 25, 2003
    #1
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  2. Bob

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    You would be better off not getting the 28-90 but going for the 28-105
    f3.5-4.5 USM instead. It is a much better lens. There is also a 28-105
    f4.5-5.6 lens that is no better than the 28-90 - they are both bottom rung
    consumer lenses. The 75-300 is a surprizingly good lens for it's low price
    (about 170 dollars at Adorama) but it is not a professional lens by a long
    shot. The more expensive 28-105 might kill your budget for the 75-300 but
    most photographers do a lot more shooting in the 28-100 region than any
    other focal lengths.
    I would be dubious of the place where you are thinking of buying. There
    are a lot of rip-offs in the camera store game (cameras are expensive and
    people are always looking fto save money, consequently there is a big
    opening for thieves). I've never heard of them, and wonder if they deliver
    what they promise. This article will tell you about the pitfalls of these
    places:
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/mani/equip/mmshops.html
    and it has links to "safe" shops as well as a website of camera store
    "horror stories".

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    New email - Contact on the Menyou page.
     
    Tony Spadaro, Sep 25, 2003
    #2
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  3. The Elan 7 is an excellent body. It may be a bit more than you need as a
    beginner, however if you are serious about learing 35mm photography you will
    soon outgrow a lesser Canon body and want some of the features and performance
    of the Elan 7. Consider the Canon 420EX flash also. The built-in flash is
    okay, but the 420 will be a big step up in utility and picture quality.

    The 2 lenses are okay, but not great. They are however good values, and IMHO
    better than aftermarket lenses.

    If you do not need a longer zoom lens like the 75-300, you would be better off
    with the Canon 28-135 IS. "IS" is "image stabilized". It has an internal gyro
    that stabilizes the image for hand held lower speed scenes. Also the optics
    are very good in this lens for a consumer zoom, far superior to the 2 you are
    considering. I have this lens and use it most frequently although all my other
    lenses are professional ("Canon L") single fical length lenses.

    Check B&H, Adorama, or KEH for prices. Very dependable mail order companies.
    Many others are just plain nightmares to deal with.

    If you get the Elan 7 read the manual thoroughly first and go through all
    capabilities without film first. Then load film and shoot with the manual open
    to learn the camera.

    Good luck.

    Larry
     
    LarryLarry2003, Sep 25, 2003
    #3
  4. Tony wrote:
    <<You would be better off not getting the 28-90 but going for the 28-105
    f3.5-4.5 USM instead. It is a much better lens. There is also a 28-105
    f4.5-5.6 lens that is no better than the 28-90 - they are both bottom rung
    consumer lenses. The 75-300 is a surprizingly good lens for it's low price
    (about 170 dollars at Adorama) but it is not a professional lens by a long
    shot. The more expensive 28-105 might kill your budget for the 75-300 but
    most photographers do a lot more shooting in the 28-100 region than any
    other focal lengths.>>

    This is another excellent option/advice in addition to what I wrote.

    Larry
     
    LarryLarry2003, Sep 25, 2003
    #4
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