Entire Roll of Film Exposed to Light?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Wandering Albatross, Nov 1, 2006.

  1. Yesterday, when I stopped by Walgreens to pick up my pictures, the lady
    behind the counter told me the entire roll of film had been exposed to
    light. She said I should check my camera for "light leaks". I took these
    pictures with a Minolta SRT100. I've never had this problem before. How do
    I identify these light leaks?

    Thanks.
     
    Wandering Albatross, Nov 1, 2006
    #1
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  2. Wandering Albatross

    All_Thumbs Guest

    So she says, could be that THEY messed up.
     
    All_Thumbs, Nov 1, 2006
    #2
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  3. Wandering Albatross

    Stan Beck Guest

    Run another roll of film through it, and have it processed somewhere else.

    Usually, light leaks will shoe up as streaks across the width of the film.
    Most likely, they botched it, and are putting the blame on you. This can
    happen anywhere, and processor limit their liability to a new roll of film -
    not much help, I'm afraid.



    --
    If time slows down as velocity increases, then my broadband connection must
    be really fast !

    Stan Beck > From New Orleans to Brandon MS
    To reply, remove 101 from address.
    ***
     
    Stan Beck, Nov 1, 2006
    #3
  4. She showed me a couple of pictures they were able to develop. The first
    one
    was very, very dark. And the second one was white with streaks of red
    and blue near the top. Does that sound like a light leak?

    Thanks.
     
    Wandering Albatross, Nov 1, 2006
    #4
  5. this is not a light leak, this was the wrong lightswitch in the darkroom...

    Andreas
     
    Andreas Gugau, Nov 1, 2006
    #5
  6. Wandering Albatross

    BGMedia Guest

    Yet another reason to go digital -- it leaves YOU in control, and you
    don't have to rely on some kid that's never held a film camera
    before....

    Don't take this as a flame, I shot with film for years and year,
    switching to digital with Canon's D30. Is it different? Sure. Does
    it introduce a new set of limitations? Of course. Was it worth it?
    100% and then some! It has made me a much better photographer, been
    more convenient to take, view and catalog pictures, and actually been
    cheaper!

    I absoloutly cannot think of one reasonable reason to stick with film
    unless it's for the novelty of delyed gratification.
     
    BGMedia, Nov 2, 2006
    #6
  7. Wandering Albatross

    m Ransley Guest

    Shoot another roll if its fine walgreens will give you a free roll, but
    since buying a cheap P&S my expensive Canon with great lenses is a
    paperweight, digital is that much better in so many ways.
     
    m Ransley, Nov 2, 2006
    #7
  8. Well, I also have full control of my films... home processing in
    excellent quality ;-) Only destroyed once a b&w-film when I took D-76 to
    fix the fim.

    Andreas
     
    Andreas Gugau, Nov 2, 2006
    #8
  9. Wandering Albatross

    Stan Beck Guest

    Yes, but it is more likely to be from light entering the canister than the
    camera. This happens sometimes when taking the canister out of the camera
    in bright sunlight, or letting bright light shine upon one end of the film
    canister.

    Shoot another roll, and see what happens.

    --
    If time slows down as velocity increases, then my broadband connection must
    be really fast !

    Stan Beck > From New Orleans to Brandon MS
    To reply, remove 101 from address.
    ***
     
    Stan Beck, Nov 2, 2006
    #9
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