experience of returning camera to Best Buy

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Racer X, Jan 10, 2006.

  1. Racer X

    Bill Funk Guest

    Yes.
    It is the job of the customer to point out and demonstrate the
    problem.
    If that customer needs to go into the restroom to do so, so be it.
    The other alternative is for the store to accept for return *any* item
    the customer claims is defective without any checking at all.
    This will result in much higher costs for consumers. There's no way
    around it.
    The end result in this case was that the customer was able to return
    the camera. You can claim that this was somehow evil because the
    customer waqs required to demonstrate his claim of a defective
    product, but that doesn't change the facts that this is necessary, and
    it worked.
     
    Bill Funk, Jan 15, 2006
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  2. Bill Funk wrote:
    ....
    ....

    It seems odd that this seems to be one of the few, if only, stores
    that requires the customer to demonstrate how the item is defective
    on the spot before a return is authorized. I can think of lots of
    items which would be impossible to demonstrate in the store. It's
    likely this isn't even a Best Buy requirement but rather just some
    power tripping minimum wage employee.

    Sure, they should test the items to verify the claim but that can
    be done by qualified people once it's has been returned and the items
    repaired, refurbished or simply resold. The other alternative is a
    simple "No Returns" policy.

    Anthony
     
    Anthony Matonak, Jan 15, 2006
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  3. Racer X

    Rod Speed Guest

    Not legal if its defective.
     
    Rod Speed, Jan 15, 2006
  4. Racer X

    Ernie Klein Guest

    Best Buy's policy is that an item can be returned within 30 days (15 for
    computers and some other items) for _any_ reason. Why would a customer
    claim an item was defective if it was not? What could anyone gain by
    claiming the item was defective when they could just return it anyway?

    I assume that most customers, like me, want the item in question,
    otherwise I wouldn't have purchased it in the first place. If the item
    is defective I am going to exchange it for one that works.

    Why in the world would the store think I would try to exchange a
    non-defective item for another non-defective item? It doesn't make
    sense. I am the one that has to repackage the item and travel to the
    store on my time and expense in order to exchange the item so I can get
    one that works. What could I possible gain by returning a good item to
    the store and claiming it is defective? The store can return the item
    to the manufacture for full credit.
    As I have stated in another post: I have returned/exchanged several
    defective items to Best Buy and have never been asked to demonstrate the
    problem.
    For big box stores like Best Buy, a no returns policy == a no customers
    policy.

    --
    -Ernie-

    "There are only two kinds of computer users -- those who have
    suffered a catastrophic hard drive failure, and those who will."

    Have you done your backup today?
     
    Ernie Klein, Jan 15, 2006
  5. To avoid the 15% re-stocking charge.
    The OP wanted a refund, not an exchange.


    True, but the big stores are finding a too liberal returns policy = no
    profit.
     
    Edwin Pawlowski, Jan 15, 2006
  6. Racer X

    Ernie Klein Guest

    That may not be correct everywhere but it is in California. If an item
    is defective "out of the box" the merchant must take it back.

    If the merchant didn't normally take returns, this would probable be a
    case where the merchant _would_ make you demonstrate the defect, because
    the merchant doesn't depend on a liberal return policy to compete for
    business.

    --
    -Ernie-

    "There are only two kinds of computer users -- those who have
    suffered a catastrophic hard drive failure, and those who will."

    Have you done your backup today?
     
    Ernie Klein, Jan 15, 2006
  7. Racer X

    Rod Speed Guest

    Not just california. I'm not aware of anywhere in the entire
    modern first world where the law doesnt require that
    goods that have never worked properly cant be returned.
    Its the reverse, they have to demonstrate that the goods arent defective.
     
    Rod Speed, Jan 15, 2006
  8. Racer X

    Ron Hunter Guest

    The restroom location was HIS idea. Surely the manager had an
    office.... And it shouldn't take 20 minutes, but it is not me that is
    looking foolish here. Calling a company 'evil' because they follow good
    business practice looks foolish.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 15, 2006
  9. Racer X

    Ron Hunter Guest

    NO, I see you snipped your reference to the persons you insulted. There
    is certainly an 'in your face' attitude here, and people who work with
    the public pick up on that quickly, and it can render them less
    pleasant to deal with. Perhaps if you would think of them as ladies,
    rather than 'bitches' then your problems would go away.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 15, 2006
  10. Racer X

    Ron Hunter Guest

    You make the mistake of thinking that your experience is always the
    determining factor in choice of a store. It is not, for me, I make my
    own evaluations. If you have a problem with a store, don't go back
    there. Your choice. But don't conclude that your experience will be
    repeated at another store by another customer, because that isn't
    rational. Feel free to describe your own experience, but don't conclude
    that the experience is universal.

    BTW, Best Buy has NEVER interrupted my dinner with a phone call, and I
    AM on the 'do not call' list....
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 15, 2006
  11. Racer X

    Bill Funk Guest

    I've never seen that as law anywhere.
    If the store has a policy that they will only accept returns without a
    stocking fee if the item is defective, it's up to the customer to
    demonstrate a defect if he wants to have the item returned.
    The customer can't just make a claim the item is defective, then shift
    the burdon to the store to prove it isn't. He must be able to
    demonstrate the defect.
     
    Bill Funk, Jan 15, 2006
  12. Racer X

    Bill Funk Guest

    Fry's Electronics has much the same polity.
    Obviously, if no such demonstration is necessary, the customer doesn't
    need to make the demonstration.
    But that's not what's being discussed.
    Bad assumption today.
    Retailers are very much aware of those who want a free loan over the
    holidays, for example, or just for a vacation.
    *IF* the manufacturer has the same liberal policies as the retailer,
    that can be done.
    And, we aren't discussing just returning an item for an exact
    replacement; the original situation was about returning an item for
    refund, which changes things.
    Good for you. Don't confuse those experiences with an idea that that
    is a universal trait among retailers, even within the same chain.
    Obviously not.
     
    Bill Funk, Jan 15, 2006
  13. Racer X

    Bill Funk Guest

    20 minutes was the *entire* time involved, including waiting in line.
    Not unreasonable, IMO.
    The restroom tging was, IMO, a case of being unprepared; I would have
    had a recorded tape with me when I walked in, and saved some time.
     
    Bill Funk, Jan 15, 2006
  14. A tape? You're kidding, Bill? I have been reading this thread with total
    amazement. If I take something back to any merchant and they can't accept
    my word for describing a defect and give me the same exact replacement model
    they simply don't want my future business. Ordering on-line seems the only
    way to do business these days. I first research my purchase and then the
    merchant I might be doing business with. I get my item much cheaper than I
    can locally and for some magical reason it's always factory sealed and
    rarely if ever do I find it to be defective.

    The great thing about buying on-line is it gives the consumer a higher
    degree of protection (Card Not Present transaction) against all these petty
    games some merchants seem to enjoy playing. And it's an extra layer of
    aggravation to consumers that want to "rent" an item since return shipping
    is a nuisance.






    Rita
     
    Rita Ä Berkowitz, Jan 15, 2006
  15. Right, but the OP did not want replacement, he wanted money back. He may be
    honest, but not all people are.
     
    Edwin Pawlowski, Jan 15, 2006
  16. Racer X

    Rod Speed Guest

    Its part of the common law in common law countrys.
    Legally that is just plain wrong.
    Legally that is just plain wrong. Tho many shop
    keepers are ignorant of the basics with the law.
     
    Rod Speed, Jan 15, 2006
  17. Racer X

    Bill Funk Guest

    I've never heard that.
    Got a cite?
    No, it's not.
    Why would it be?
    I think maybe you're confusing this with something else. In the US,
    the retailer is not required to accept a return simply because the
    customer says, "It's broken." It actually has to be broken. The
    customer must demonstrate that it's broken.
     
    Bill Funk, Jan 15, 2006
  18. Racer X

    Bill Funk Guest

    We are, unfortunately, talking about different things.
    Not a replacement, but a return for a refund. Moiney back. As in free
    rental.
    Non sequitur.
    Those "games" lower your cost. I thought maybe that would be somewhat
    important to you, since you seem to think that's one of the major good
    things about buying online.
    When you need to return something online, do you just send it back
    with a cover note saying, "It's broken. Refund my money"? Or do you
    describe the broken part?
     
    Bill Funk, Jan 15, 2006
  19. Racer X

    Rod Speed Guest

    Cite for what ? You never heard about the common law ?
    Yes it is.
    Because that is the law.
    Yes, but the customer doesnt have to PROVE that its broken.
    Most obviously with an intermittent fault.
    Wrong, legally.
     
    Rod Speed, Jan 15, 2006
  20. I think we're talking about the same thing but looking at it differently.
    Yes, I realize he wanted his money back and not a return. My feeling is if
    the OP was intent on getting a "properly" functioning camera he would have
    tried another instead of demanding his money back. And as you can see his
    pissing contest got him his money back. It's called customer service
    whether you or I agree with it or not. The bottom line here is that a
    customer is going to get a full refund. It's just a matter of whose pride
    will be hurt first.
    Absolutely not, especially when this is the proper way towards a logical
    progression to deal with all scenarios and directions this thread has taken.
    When I purchase an item I am purchasing an item and the last thing I want to
    do is play games. It's black and white for me. Either you are going to
    refund my money or you are not. If are not going to refund my money than
    you damn well better have had a "No Refunds" sign posted at the register or
    on the merchandise you are trying to sell me. These games have nothing to
    do with lowering our costs.
    Nope! I call the merchant and explain my problem and figure out what my
    options are and how *THEY* want to handle it first. For instance I ordered
    an item that came to me slightly damaged, but it was usable when I put it
    back together. I thought about it and seen this is a design flaw that can
    cause problems when in use. So, I called the merchant and explained the
    situation. They volunteered without me asking to send a replacement. I
    asked if I could exchange this one for a different brand of better quality
    that was slightly more expensive. They did. That's how it's done. They
    now have a repeat loyal customer.







    Rita
     
    Rita Ä Berkowitz, Jan 15, 2006
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