Exposure metering for Beginner

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Maple Muse, Aug 5, 2003.

  1. Maple Muse

    Maple Muse Guest

    Can anyone suggest a good book on how to properly meter a scene? For a
    beginner, I do not want to read a book about the 10 different shades of
    grey. I am looking for a basic guide to using spot meter and other baic
    technique.

    Thanks Charles.
     
    Maple Muse, Aug 5, 2003
    #1
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  2. Maple Muse

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    Try something by John Hedgecoe. You can usually find a couple of his books
    in the local library and they usually deal with exposure in a fairly
    straightforward manner -- never a mention of N -1 processing. If you don't
    find anything by Hedgecoe, see what else the library has to offer, and/or
    try a used books store.
    --
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    Tony Spadaro, Aug 5, 2003
    #2
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  3. Maple Muse

    John N. Guest

    I've got a couple Hedgecoe books, also bought one called Understanding
    Exposure by Bryan Peterson, but exposure never *really* sunk in until I read
    a couple things by John Shaw. Landscape Photography is one title, the other
    escapes me now. It really reshaped the way I thought about looking at things
    and metering a scene.

    John
     
    John N., Aug 5, 2003
    #3
  4. Such a request is absolutely useless without some background from you.
    We have no idea how to answer such a question without knowing what
    kind of film, camera, and situation you're in.

    B&W? Color neg? Color transparency? 4 x 5? 35mm? Hasselblad? Scenery?
    Architecture? All of these things matter. As far as 'basic technique',
    a spot meter is already beyond that.
     
    Michael Scarpitti, Aug 6, 2003
    #4
  5. Maple Muse

    Chris London Guest

    "Closeups in Nature" is the other one by John Shaw. They both say very
    similar things about exposure.
     
    Chris London, Aug 7, 2003
    #5
  6. Maple Muse

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    I guess that shows what makes horse races as I never found Shaw's advice on
    exposure to be helpful to my students. I'm not saying it is wrong, but I
    have spent a lot of time straightening out a lot of confusion caused by his
    book. I will say his method of "testing" the reliability of an in-camera
    light meter is wrong though. I won't get into it here, but it is complete
    nonsense.
    However, I suspect on the other stuff it's more a matter of how the
    brain works and what works for you is going to be differrent from what works
    for me.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    New email - Contact on the Menyou page.
     
    Tony Spadaro, Aug 7, 2003
    #6
  7. Maple Muse

    Jim Guest

    "The Photographer's Guide To Expoosure" by Jack Neubart.

    Jim


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    Jim, Aug 7, 2003
    #7
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