Extracting a graphic from Word to Photoshop

Discussion in 'Photoshop Tutorials' started by Ki Suk Hahn, Nov 7, 2003.

  1. Ki Suk Hahn

    Ki Suk Hahn Guest

    I have a Word file that has an embedded graphic. When I resize the the
    graphic it "does not lose resolution" (no pixelation, up to a certain point)

    I tried extracting that graphic by (in Word) select-Copy then in Photoshop
    File-New-OK-Paste. The graphic looks much worse than the original. I don't
    know how to extract the original graphic to a file (of whatever format it
    was).

    I ended up resizing the graphic in Word, printing to PDF, then save to TIF,
    which seems silly.

    Anyone has some ideas?

    KSH
     
    Ki Suk Hahn, Nov 7, 2003
    #1
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  2. Ki Suk Hahn

    l Guest

    Read a recent thread named "Getting photo OUT of Word Doc" in
    comp.publish.prepress.

    ..lauri
     
    l, Nov 7, 2003
    #2
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  3. Ki Suk Hahn

    Eric Gill Guest

    You're assuming Microsoft wants to let you do this.
    Word is silly. Aside from opening the PDF directly in Photoshop, you've hit
    on the way the professionals (i.e., us that act like pros) do it.
     
    Eric Gill, Nov 7, 2003
    #3
  4. Ki Suk Hahn

    J C Guest

    And in addition to reading that thread -- which concerns getting a
    photo out of Word by PDF'ing the Word doc -- consider that if your
    graphic is a table or chart, the better solution would be to
    copy/paste from Word to Illustrator.


    -- JC
     
    J C, Nov 7, 2003
    #4
  5. Ki Suk Hahn

    JP Kabala Guest

    I posted this to another Photoshop NG earlier this week. I am in the
    process of writing a procedures manual for some documentation folks
    and this question comes up a lot. It used to be very simple, but,
    suddenly in Office XP and now 2003, it has turned into
    a gauntlet. I figured it had to be my fault.....so I called the source.

    I spent a healthy chunk of time on the phone with a very polite Microsoft
    support tech last Friday-- and the answer is-- Microsoft is intentionally
    and knowingly making it difficult to extract and edit an image embedded
    in Word and have it look anything like decent.

    It isn't a mistake or a bug, they know it's a PITA and they don't (bleep)ing
    care.

    This only applies if you have a version later than Office 2K and, yes,
    it does still apply to the newest Office 2003. I made them check.

    They have disabled "edit picture" on purpose, and every workaround suggested
    by their tech support produces posterized, over-compressed images that are
    basically worthless.

    Without their help, I did come up with three scenarios that actually produce
    better quality images than anything they mentioned. (but still not as good
    as
    I might like) Two of the three require something other than Office and
    an image editor be installed on your system.

    The first, if you have PowerPoint installed, is to copy the image to the
    clipboard and paste it into a Power Point slide, then save the PowerPoint
    slide as a jpg. That file can then be edited in a decent image editor
    normally.
    Of all the three options, this produces the best results with the least
    pain, and
    it doesn't assume you have a bunch of additional apps installed. This is the
    one
    I'd recommend to someone who is not a graphics pro and may not have
    Acrobat or another distiller installed.

    The second, if do you have Acrobat or another PDF utility on your computer,
    is
    to produce a PDF file from the Word document, and edit that document in PS
    You lose some quality, but it is infinitely better than anything MS had to
    offer me. This is the standard prepress solution.

    The third requires you to have a screen capture utility. It is more
    "brute force" but seems to work well for embedded screen captures of
    dialog boxes and other diagrams Increase your screen resolution
    as high as it will go. Open the document in Word. Zoom in as far as you can
    and keep the entire image on screen. Capture the screen. Save that file .
    Restore your previous display settings. Open the file in PS and edit it
    there. By changing the screen resolution, you can take a 400x400 image and
    boost
    it up to 2 or three times that-- then when you resize down, some of the
    "crispness" comes back. This is really dumb, and my least favorite of the
    three,
    but may be worth exploring if all else fails.

    Hope this helps.
     
    JP Kabala, Nov 7, 2003
    #5
  6. Hi Ki Suk Hahn,
    try saving your file in the html format - you end up with an html file
    plus the individual graphic file.
    However, I cannot say if the quality of the graphic file come sclose to
    the original.

    Take care,

    Mike
     
    Michael Jaeger, Nov 7, 2003
    #6
  7. Ki Suk Hahn

    Rick Hughes Guest

    The way to extract a image from a word doc is to save the doc as html.

    Rick
     
    Rick Hughes, Nov 8, 2003
    #7
  8. Ki Suk Hahn

    Ki Suk Hahn Guest

    Thanks for all the responses to this question. There were four ways to do
    what I needed:

    1. Save Word->PDF
    2. Copy picture to clipboard and past to PowerPoint, then save to jpg
    3. Maximize the view in Word and do a screen capture
    4. Save Word to HTML

    I thought I remembered a 'edit image' option and it was confirmed by a
    previous post that older versions of Word had it and newer ones (mine)
    don't. It is interesting that when you paste from clipboard to PowerPoint,
    the image is ok, but pasting to Photoshop wrecks the image. I wonder how
    much architecting was required to add that 'feature' in.

    I tried the save to HTML and the files in the graphics folders look ok.
    Seems like this option is the easiest.

    Thanks again to all.

    Ki Suk
     
    Ki Suk Hahn, Nov 8, 2003
    #8
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