Eyeglasses

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Paul Furman, Apr 8, 2009.

  1. Paul Furman

    tony cooper Guest


    I would be quite happy to see the government stop protecting you from
    your own stupidity. The budget is stretched as it is, and the task is
    enormous.
     
    tony cooper, Apr 17, 2009
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  2. No.
     
    John McWilliams, Apr 18, 2009
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  3. Paul Furman

    Wilba Guest

    I have an old pair that look like the coating is crazed, like a fingerprint
    of closely spaced fine cracks. They give a slight haze under some
    conditions, but it doesn't bother me for what I do with them. I wonder if
    the coating could be stripped, or polished off - what do you think?
     
    Wilba, Apr 18, 2009
  4. Paul Furman

    Pat Guest

    I heard the economy is so bad that one lobbying firm had to lay off 3
    congressmen.
     
    Pat, Apr 18, 2009
  5. Paul Furman

    ASAAR Guest

    Yes, I'm aware of the difference, as well as the fact that extreme
    libertarians share many of the extreme far right's fantasies. Some
    libertarian values are commendable, but many "libertarians" are such
    in name only, just as many have recently discovered that G. "Dubya"
    Bush was a conservative in name only. What he actually is, is as
    much subject to the definition of what "is" is. It's quite amusing
    that this callow yuppie son of a northeastern elite "dynasty" so
    quickly shed the "hard work" image as soon as he left office. The
    image forming non-working "Texas Ranch" was purchased in time for
    his political career, and sold as soon as he left the White House.
    I hear that several Bush relatives have ownership of up to 45% of
    the Banana Republic prescription lens mills. Another 30% is owned
    by Saudis having very close Bush family ties. At least you can be
    happy to know that much of the thousands of dollars that you've
    overpaid over the years for prescription glasses have gone to those
    you've supported for so long. This democracy of ours really works
    (for some). Welcome to the jungle. The liberal jungle if you
    insist. Kumbaya. The lion sleeps tonight, and so should you.
    Pleasant dreams. :)
     
    ASAAR, Apr 18, 2009
  6. Paul Furman

    Wilba Guest

    Them.

    What methods would you suggest? What would dissolve the coating? What can I
    use to polish glass?
     
    Wilba, Apr 18, 2009
  7. Paul Furman

    Wilba Guest

    The hot tip for plastic lenses seems to be a glass etching product called
    Armour Etch, e.g. -
    http://bookish.us/2009/03/15/readers-fixing-readers/
     
    Wilba, Apr 18, 2009
  8. Paul Furman

    ASAAR Guest

    Hang in there Bill, the world wouldn't be as quite the same
    without a few wingnuts around to keep things interesting. :) If
    there's a conspiracy to sniff out, though, why not look into how the
    system has been tailored to whittle down the ranks of the middle
    class, benefit going to those at the highest levels of the upper
    class. The pols most in favor of these changes being the
    conservatives (going back to Reagan and his assault on unions) that
    regularly make charges of "class warfare" even while they've been
    successfully playing that game for decades. Look around the world
    and you'll see that the worst countries to live in are the ones with
    the most extreme disparity between their majority poor and their
    small numbers in a fantastically wealthy upper class. They're the
    ones that use the police and military to deal harshly with
    "malcontents". Guess which direction we've been traveling for the
    last several decades? Wear a button proclaiming support for the
    wrong party and get shuttled by the police and secret service into
    distant (beyond sight of the media) "free speech zones" encircled by
    razor wire.

    What? You didn't include Bernie Sanders? I guess that his
    libertarian streak trumps his leftist leanings. :)

    Couldn't you bring the cats with you? Caring for them in South
    America would certainly be less expensive. You shouldn't be so
    selective in your criticism of politicians. Others were far more
    responsible for the economic problems, including many Republicans.
    Do you remember any of the objections that were raised when Harvey
    Pitt replaced Arthur Levitt at the SEC about the time of the repeal
    of Glass-Steagall? Here are a few snippets from a much larger PDF
    file. There's still a lot to it, so print it out, have it bound
    into a book, and take it with you to the bathroom. :) As you read
    it, remember that it's not about today's current events, but what
    occurred nearly seven years ago :
    [ Byron Dorgan, Chairman, presiding: ]
    [ HOWARD M. METZENBAUM (RETIRED SENATOR) ]


    [ Richard Moore, Treasurer for the State of North Carolina ]
    [ Joan Claybrook, President, Public Citizen ]
    ( ah, yes, Enron. It's head, "Kenny Boy" Lay was a close family
    friend of the Bushes, and Enron was, IIRC, Dubya's largest campaign
    contributor, even flying him from campaign stop to campaign stop in
    Enron's jets. At one point Dubya said that he hardly knew Ken Lay,
    and that Lay contributed to his opponent (Anne Richardson, in
    Texas), neglecting to mention that Lay contributed far less money to
    Richardson than he did to Bush. )
    [ Barbara Boxer, U.S. Senator from California ]
    An lastly, from William Greider's Jan. 17, 2002 article :
    Did he try to do anything significant about the problem, or was it
    a face/ass saving measure for historians, knowing what was to come?
    You might if you have an open mind. Or do you think that Phil and
    Wendy Gramm are liberal Democrats? Neither liberals nor
    conservatives are to blame. Save your ire for the greedy rapacious
    corporate executives and the politicians that accept their bribes.
    All legal too. Them that makes the laws are them that sit on fat
    wallets. The Supreme Court is an accomplice, with its decision
    equating money (mostly corporate supplied) with free speech.
     
    ASAAR, Apr 18, 2009
  9. Paul Furman

    Private Guest

    snip
    BTW, did you see that the US military now offers it to all soldiers
    for free. It's cheaper to give it to a pilot than to train a new
    pilot, etc.

    I would be interested to know if the US military is in fact suggesting that
    pilots have LASIK surgery.

    For many years Transport Canada recommended that pilots NOT have LASIK or
    similar surgery and while I cannot find a current cite note that there are
    many current concerns and restrictions on flying after surgery.
    http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/Cam/eyesurgery.htm
    Why does TC have concerns about this procedure?

    While the advances in this area of surgery have been impressive and the
    outcomes have improved in terms of fewer complications and shorter period of
    incapacitation, there are still issues that have a serious potential for
    affecting safety in flight. The most important risks from an aviation
    standpoint are loss of best corrected visual acuity, undercorrection, or
    overcorrection, fluctuation in vision at different times of the day, glare,
    "halo" or "starburst" effect due to corneal haze, loss of contrast
    sensitivity, loss of low contrast visual acuity and regression or return
    towards pre-operative refractive levels.

    http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q...btnG=Google+Search&meta=cr=countryCA&aq=f&oq=

    http://www.helicoptersmagazine.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=464

    One final note: See if your ophthalmologist wears glasses and if he does,
    ask him why he hasn't had the procedure done!

    Good luck and Happy landings.
     
    Private, Apr 18, 2009
  10. Paul Furman

    Private Guest

    snip
    I would be interested to know if the US military is in fact suggesting that
    pilots have LASIK surgery.

    For many years Transport Canada recommended that pilots NOT have LASIK or
    similar surgery and while I cannot find a current cite note that there are
    many current concerns and restrictions on flying after surgery.
    http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/Cam/eyesurgery.htm
    Why does TC have concerns about this procedure?

    While the advances in this area of surgery have been impressive and the
    outcomes have improved in terms of fewer complications and shorter period of
    incapacitation, there are still issues that have a serious potential for
    affecting safety in flight. The most important risks from an aviation
    standpoint are loss of best corrected visual acuity, undercorrection, or
    overcorrection, fluctuation in vision at different times of the day, glare,
    "halo" or "starburst" effect due to corneal haze, loss of contrast
    sensitivity, loss of low contrast visual acuity and regression or return
    towards pre-operative refractive levels.

    http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q...btnG=Google+Search&meta=cr=countryCA&aq=f&oq=

    http://www.helicoptersmagazine.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=464

    One final note: See if your ophthalmologist wears glasses and if he does,
    ask him why he hasn't had the procedure done!

    Good luck and Happy landings.
     
    Private, Apr 18, 2009
  11. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Thank you!

    This explains the ambiguity I felt while being examined.
    Yeah but I'm super-picky about my vision :)

    Which of the tests evaluates for cataracts?

    ....
    These bifocals are the opposite of what's comfortable looking at the
    computer.

    The last three exams I had, the optician mentioned my eyes are rather
    widely spaced and they all spoke a number but that number doesn't appear
    on my prescriptions. This is a problem. I checked again just now.

    If that number was on the prescription, the cutting machine should be
    able to include that in the cut.

    I should be able to order some straight bifocals online for cheap to see
    for myself how it works. The bummer is waiting since my old glasses are
    missing a lens. That's where LC's 1-hour service was nice. Because they
    stock a pretty decent range of blanks... I guess...

    I do have to go back (or at least call) to get my money back :)
    And currently, I'm enjoying these (approximately OK) lenses which is
    better than drug-store reading glasses on-and-off all the time.

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Apr 18, 2009
  12. Paul Furman

    N Guest


    Prior to getting glasses with coatings, I went into a department store here
    in Sydney which had just refurbished their china and glassware floor with
    black flooring, black cabinets and downlights. I couldn't see past my nose.
    It was like the light was getting into the lens and couldn't get out.

    I'm very long sighted.
     
    N, Apr 18, 2009
  13. Paul Furman

    tony cooper Guest

    Cataracts, at a certain age, are not a you-have-them-or-you-don't
    thing. Cataracts are a condition of the lens where it becomes cloudy
    due to protein clumping. They are a progressive condition where the
    cloudiness eventually has significant effect on your vision. Sixty
    percent of people over 60 have some indication of cataracts.

    They are detected in the examination when the doctor (or whoever does
    the exam) looks into the eye through the slit lamp. One of the
    reasons they dilate the pupil is to detect the progression. The
    visual acuity test (charts) also indicate the progression. The
    tonometer test (air puff or weight) is also part of determining the
    progress because it detects hardening of the lens as well as the
    outflow of eye fluid that is the glaucoma test.

    My lenses started to cloud about four years ago. My ophthalmologist
    says I'm still a couple of years away from needing cataract surgery if
    the rate of change stays the same.

    The ophthalmologist doesn't recommend cataract surgery when the
    condition is first detected. The recommendation is made when the
    condition has progressed to the point where the vision is so affected
    that the surgery is required.

    If you've been regularly going to the same doctor, you may be
    surprised to find out that he's charted that you have some cataract
    condition but he's not discussed it with you because it's not at the
    stage where it's a problem and there's no point in alarming you. He
    will encourage you to have regular exams in the future because the
    condition will worsen.
     
    tony cooper, Apr 18, 2009
  14. Paul Furman

    Bruce Guest


    I have used coated glass lenses for years, and have never had these
    problems.

    My current lenses are coated plastic; they are equally as good as the
    coated glass, but not better. Other than being lighter, and less
    scratch resistant, I don't see any difference.
     
    Bruce, Apr 18, 2009
  15. Paul Furman

    Ray Fischer Guest

    It's a good thing that "liberals" haven't yet been able to create a
    single-payer system in the US or you'd have to find something
    completely different to complain about.
     
    Ray Fischer, Apr 18, 2009
  16. Paul Furman

    Bruce Guest


    I think you meant to say "they must have cost you a fortune" and yes,
    they certainly did. I use Nikon lenses in Silhouette frames and have a
    complex prescription with varying amounts of short sight and quite
    severe astigmatism, plus I need quite strong bifocals for reading.

    So my lenses are ultra-high index varifocals with anti-reflection and
    anti-scratch coatings, and did I mention that they cost a fortune?

    ;-)
     
    Bruce, Apr 18, 2009
  17. Paul Furman

    Bruce Guest


    Then we're in the same ballpark. I don't begrudge a single penny of
    what I paid (no insurance contribution here in the UK) as they are light
    and comfortable and work well.

    My only complaint is one that applies to all the glasses I have ever
    had, that when looking through a viewfinder it is difficult to see
    (camera) lens distortion because there is some distortion inherent in
    the lenses of my glasses. That distortion is made slightly worse by my
    choice of ultra-high index lenses, but I would far rather tolerate that
    than the thick, heavy glasses that I used to have.

    Still, I pay a lot for my camera lenses because one of my priorities is
    to obtain the lowest possible distortion. If distortion isn't present,
    I don't have to worry whether I can see it or not. ;-)
     
    Bruce, Apr 18, 2009
  18. Paul Furman

    Pat Guest

     
    Pat, Apr 18, 2009
  19. And I thank you, too, for this good piece of information...;-)
    Um, then get rid of those "sharp-only-in-the-center-sometimes"
    progressive lenses...

    They can be improved upon for general use by not having the
    inset lenses prescribed for the ridiculously close focus that is
    usually used (18"-22+" works better than 16"), by having the
    insets placed lower than normal to avoid unpleasant and
    unnecessary intrusion into the distance-corrected lenses, by
    making the insets as small as possible to give the best possible
    "ground vision" when walking, using stairs, and by having the
    inset flat-tops tops angled to be on axis with the eye for least
    visibility. I also prefer to have the four available lens powers
    set for infinity, 5', 2+', 1.5' to give the greatest range of sharp
    vision while maintaining the best possible peripheral vision. I
    hated "progressives" when I tried them.

    [...]
    At least with standard type lenses, an optician showed me how to find
    the centers by breathing on the lenses (matte spots appeared at the
    optical centers...).
    There are spaces (L, R, ADD-L, ADD-R) for values for spherical,
    cylindrical, axis, prism, and base on my prescription forms. If your base
    measurement was unusual, that should have been noted.

    True, in my experience.

    Same here, and I prize good peripheral vision in all possible directions.
    But, maybe not... Nothing beats accurate filing of an accurately made
    prescription, and the accurate fitting of the lenses to good (NOT those
    squinty little fashionable...) frames. Good sight is the point of having
    good glasses!

    Good advice. And, why I avoid "cheapo" chains (and good optometrists
    can be found that cost no more...).

    Very interesting. One would need the intraocular measurement, though,
    and would unlikely be able to get the custom features I appreciate, but
    for cheaps (for a second pair), the prices are right. I prefer frames with
    larger lens areas (for obvious reasons), thin side bars (for best side vision),
    and to avoid the high-index lenses (to minimize chromatic problems).
    Since PF's prescription is relatively weak (as I recall) and if plastic is
    used instead of glass (I prefer that anyway, for other reasons), then
    good, large-lens glasses that weigh almost nothing can be made.

    I HEARTILY AGREE!!! Just go back to get your money back,
    though...;-)
    --DR
     
    David Ruether, Apr 18, 2009
  20. Paul Furman

    tony cooper Guest

    I may have erred. I was writing on the supposition that Paul at least
    60. He may be much younger. My guess was based on his interest in
    his vision. Usually, young people are unconcerned about this unless
    they have some specific condition. It's the old farts like me who get
    concerned about our deteriorating body parts.

    If Paul starts asking questions about the removal of the excess nasal
    or ear hair that has suddenly started to appear in his mirror, or why
    the urge to pee has started to come on more swiftly, then I will be
    vindicated in my guess of his age.
     
    tony cooper, Apr 18, 2009
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