File formats

Discussion in 'Video Cameras' started by Simon Mayo, Nov 1, 2006.

  1. Simon Mayo

    Simon Mayo Guest

    I have a JVC camcorder which records to hard drive. The files are given
    a.MOD format. This format is not recognised by Adobe Premiere Pro. Does any
    one have any suggestions to help me with this problem? I have tried Xilisoft
    file converter but converting the files with this programme reduces their
    size and quality below an acceptable level.
     
    Simon Mayo, Nov 1, 2006
    #1
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  2.  
    stephen Peterson, Nov 1, 2006
    #2
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  3. Simon Mayo

    Jukka Aho Guest

    The "MOD file format", aka "SoundTracker module format", "NoiseTracker
    module format", or "ProTracker module format" (depending on who you ask
    and which historical aspects you would like to emphasize) does not have
    much to do with MIDI music synths as such. It is more of a
    platform-specific digital music format that took advantage of the custom
    4-channel sound chip in the Amiga computers. Unlike, say, MIDI files,
    which only contain note data, MOD files contain sequenced note data AND
    the sampled instrument sounds (digitized audio data) with with which
    that note data is to be played.

    MOD music was/is used primarily in Amiga demos and games. Later, when
    PCs finally got sound features, too, the format escaped the Amiga
    platform, and "trackers" (music editor tools with which you can compose
    and sequence modules, or MODs) started appearing on other systems as
    well, nearly all of them also supporting the original 4-channel Amiga
    MOD format, although often extending the concept in various directions.

    Modern trackers use custom module formats (with custom file extensions)
    that support more than just four tracks, 16-bit instrument samples,
    control of MIDI instruments, control of VST instruments, etc., but those
    were not (and are still not!) features of the original MOD format.

    The best module trackers today - such as Renoise, MED Soundstudio, or
    MadTracker - can be used as professional music tools for creating "real"
    music.

    * * *

    There is a fairly good archive of some of the best, "classic" 4-channel
    Amiga music modules here:

    <http://totem.fix.no/pub/mods/>

    MODs can be played back on modern Windows systems with e.g. WinAmp, but
    the built-in mod player in WinAmp is not all that good. Fortunately,
    there is a plugin which fixes this (for the most part) and also has a
    slider adjustment for mixing the left and right channels together a bit,
    making the listening experience better with headphones:

    <http://www.rift.dk/page.php?1>

    (The sound chip that was originally used in the Amiga computers assigned
    two of its internal channels to the left side and two other to the
    right. This was a fixed configuration: you could not adjust the balance
    in any way, except via CPU-intensive software mixing, which was not used
    with the MOD format. Many MOD players on other platforms try to emulate
    this fixed channel configuration, but this kind of authenticity is not
    really the best way to experience the tunes with headphones.)

    There are also some music player applications that specifically cater
    for the MOD format (and related formats):

    <http://www.deliplayer.com/>
    <http://www.modplug.com/>
     
    Jukka Aho, Nov 1, 2006
    #3
  4. Simon Mayo

    Tony Morgan Guest

    Unfortunately, the JVC Everio, and the Panasonic D-Snap SD-card range
    camcorders use a relatively unsupported file format. They are designed
    for the "point-and-shoot-and-replay" users who are unlikely to want to
    do any editing.

    There is a forum thread at:
    http://www.moviecodec.com/topics/9735p2.html
    which might help - though the solutions don't seem to be very
    satisfactory.

    As someone in that thread says: "That’s the crappy part about these
    straight to DVD/tapeless camcorders. They are nice theoretically, but a
    PAIN when editing."
     
    Tony Morgan, Nov 1, 2006
    #4
  5. Simon Mayo

    Simon Mayo Guest

    I now understand where the .MOD file format comes from but why do they use
    it for camcorders when it is a sound format and how do I make it
    recognisable by Adobe Premiere Pro?
     
    Simon Mayo, Nov 2, 2006
    #5
  6. Simon Mayo

    Tony Morgan Guest

    Haven't you read the forum as I suggested?

    Had you bothered, you would have seen that Premiere does *not* support
    MOD file formats, nor can it be made to do so (nor do most video
    editing programs).

    Here. I'll give you the link again:
    http://www.moviecodec.com/topics/9735p2.html

    By my understanding there, you'll have to buy Cyberlink Power Director
    and use that to first convert your video to AVI.
     
    Tony Morgan, Nov 2, 2006
    #6
  7. Simon Mayo

    Hanson Woo Guest

    Hanson Woo, Nov 2, 2006
    #7
  8. Simon Mayo

    Jukka Aho Guest

    They don't. Apparently someone has just used the same filename extension
    for an unrelated video format.
     
    Jukka Aho, Nov 2, 2006
    #8
  9. Simon Mayo

    Konandoil Guest

    Konandoil, Dec 8, 2006
    #9
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