Fill-flash with EOS digital

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Anne & Olivier CORRE, Jan 9, 2008.

  1. Hello,

    I have many problems with my EOS 30D and the 5D when using flash outdoor : I
    always have blown out background as if the metering system tends to consider
    only the darkest part of the scene.
    Do you have the same issue, and can you give me some advice to get perfect
    ratio fill-flash (Nikon do it very well in full automatic mode)

    Thanks

    Best regards
     
    Anne & Olivier CORRE, Jan 9, 2008
    #1
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  2. Get more separation between subject and background! :)

    I generally shoot manual, at 1/200th, 5.6, and then adjust flash output
    down a half stop or more if needed.

    What lens?
     
    John McWilliams, Jan 9, 2008
    #2
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  3. Anne & Olivier CORRE

    Charles Guest

    More information would be helpful if you expect helpful responses. Mode,
    built-in flash, external flash, lens, etc.
     
    Charles, Jan 9, 2008
    #3
  4. Anne & Olivier CORRE

    Robert Coe Guest

    : Hello,
    :
    : I have many problems with my EOS 30D and the 5D when using flash outdoor : I
    : always have blown out background as if the metering system tends to consider
    : only the darkest part of the scene.
    : Do you have the same issue, and can you give me some advice to get perfect
    : ratio fill-flash (Nikon do it very well in full automatic mode)
    :
    : Thanks
    :
    : Best regards

    I've had that happen myself, and I'm pretty sure I know what the problem was.
    If you set the ISO number too high and/or use too wide a manual aperture
    setting, you'll get potentially severe overexposure on a bright day. The
    reason is that when you turn on flash, the camera refuses to use a shutter
    speed so fast that the second curtain begins to close before the first one
    finishes opening. (On my 400D it's 1/200 sec, and it's probably not
    significantly different on the cameras you name.) This is obviously necessary,
    or the flash won't illuminate the entire image. But if that speed is too slow
    for the scene, given all other exposure constraints, the picture will be
    overexposed. And it's easy to get confused by the fact that the problem goes
    away if you turn the flash off, even though the *light* from the flash makes
    no material contribution.

    Since my experience is all on Canon, I can't tell you why Nikon does it
    better. Maybe Nikons just have a faster shutter. But note that this is one
    case where full auto mode has an advantage, since it can stop the lens down to
    its minimum aperture if necessary. And on some cameras it can even adjust the
    ISO speed automatically.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jan 10, 2008
    #4
  5. Don't focus and recompose!
    Put your active AF point on the subject!

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Jan 10, 2008
    #5
  6. Anne & Olivier CORRE

    l v Guest

    While I do not have the 30d (300d and 40d), have you tried using the
    fill-flash feature described on page 105 in the manual? You use the *
    button the back. This is the Flash Exposure (FE) lock.
     
    l v, Jan 11, 2008
    #6
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