Film curves & paper curves

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Phil Lamerton, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. Please could I have some recommendations to help me choose the best
    papers for the following films?:

    APX100
    Plus X
    Fuji Acros

    I understand that the paper curve should complement the film curve,
    but I haven't been able to find much information about the curves of
    the various papers which are available.

    I am particularly interested in portraiture.

    TIA - Phil Lamerton
     
    Phil Lamerton, Oct 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. Graded papers? Nuetral, Cold or Warmtone
     
    Gregory Blank, Oct 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. Trial and error is really the best way.
     
    Uranium Committee, Oct 6, 2004
    #3
  4. Phil Lamerton

    Udie Lafing Guest

    Quack, Quack, Cracker ? Petey Wanna Cracker?
    --
    ?
    ?
    ?
    ?
    LOL
     
    Udie Lafing, Oct 6, 2004
    #4
  5. Don't feed 'em, Udie...

    --
    I may be a scwewy wabbit, but I'm not going to Alcatwaz!
    -- E. J. Fudd, 1954

    Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer
    Lathe Building Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/HomebuiltLathe.htm
    Speedway 7x12 Lathe Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/my7x12.htm

    Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
    and don't expect them to be perfect.
     
    Donald Qualls, Oct 6, 2004
    #5

  6. Fucky fucky fucky the ducky. Udder Laughing.
     
    Uranium Committee, Oct 6, 2004
    #6
  7. Trial and error is really the best way.

    I appreciate this but can't I discount some film/paper combinations
    before I start experimenting? For example, a long-toe paper might be
    suitable for a T-grain film but shouldn't I look at other papers for
    Plus-X and APX? regards, Phil Lamerton
     
    Phil Lamerton, Oct 6, 2004
    #7
  8. A long toe on paper will seldom hurt your images, I think -- all it does
    is compress the highlight tones a bit, which might help (slightly) even
    with films that block highlights the way Plus-X and other traditional
    emulsions can. A long toe will also help in recovering low-contrast
    images or those with high base fog; the longer exposures needed to print
    the shadows dark enough will have less tendency to burn out the shadows
    on a long toe paper compared with those having a more linear curve.

    --
    I may be a scwewy wabbit, but I'm not going to Alcatwaz!
    -- E. J. Fudd, 1954

    Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer
    Lathe Building Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/HomebuiltLathe.htm
    Speedway 7x12 Lathe Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/my7x12.htm

    Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
    and don't expect them to be perfect.
     
    Donald Qualls, Oct 7, 2004
    #8
  9. With Kodak, Polycontrast papers are best-suited for Plus-X and Tri-X
    roll films. Polymax paper is best-suited for T-Max films. Beyond this,
    you'll just have to experiment. I do know that I was never able to
    work with Agfa Brovira (no longer produced). The highlights just would
    not print. Ilford Ilfobrom worked just fine with the same negatives.
     
    Uranium Committee, Oct 7, 2004
    #9
  10. Phil Lamerton

    John McGraw Guest

    Respectfully, I suggest that the OP pick a paper & paper developer
    that give the effect he wants, then try to find a film & dev. that
    compliment that.
    It seems to me that the characteristics of the paper(texture, paper
    color, color [tone] of the image, & finally the way the curve handles
    the tones [shades of gray] w/in a given contrast range, are of more
    importunats than the film & developer combination, w/ in reason.
    I once set out to produce a series of portraits. I had a look in mind.
    Choise a very popular Kodak portrait paper. (Can't remember the name -
    Ekta -something had a very fine surface, not quite glosy w/ a touch of
    warmth, & souped it in a Kodak dev. - a warm toned soup, very popular,
    @ that time [again can't remember, again seems like Ekta - something].
    Shot Plus X dev in Diafine. Got the High Key effect I was looking for.
    The point is I worked backwards. Had the look in mind. Chose the paper
    & dev. Finally chose film & dev.
    Hope this helps, John
     
    John McGraw, Oct 7, 2004
    #10
  11. Please could I have some recommendations to help me choose the best

    I've just realised I got my wires crossed when I listed the 3 films
    above. Instead of Plus-X, I was really thinking about Tri-X Pro 320
    asa in 120 roll film, which has an upward rising characteristic (as
    Plus-X Pan sheet film had).

    Any pointers in short-listing some suitable papers to experiment with
    would be very much appreciated. TIA, Phil Lamerton
     
    Phil Lamerton, Oct 9, 2004
    #11
  12. Phil Lamerton

    John Guest

    IMO, the best paper you can ever print an image on is Ilford
    Galerie.

    http://www.puresilver.org/images/pdf/ilford/papers/galerieold.pdf

    Regards,

    John S. Douglas, Photographer - http://www.puresilver.org
    Please remove the "_" when replying via email
     
    John, Oct 9, 2004
    #12
  13. Phil Lamerton

    dr bob Guest

    dr bob, Oct 10, 2004
    #13
  14. Phil Lamerton

    Tom Phillips Guest


    Galerie and Seagull are my favorit papers.
     
    Tom Phillips, Oct 10, 2004
    #14
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