Film Scanner: Epson/Canon/Microtek

Discussion in 'Canon' started by LG, Aug 3, 2003.

  1. LG

    LG Guest

    Hi all,

    Looking at the
    Canon CS9900F
    Epson 3200
    Microtek 6800
    Film scanning mainly, has anybody had any experience with these
    scanners. Tell me what you think? What sort of work do you usually scan?

    What res? Sweet spots on the scanners?

    Will be scanning in negatives sized at 35mm, 6x6,6x7 and 6x9. My
    negatives/tranny are quite dark, do any of the scanners account for
    this? Can you set how dense the negative/tranny is?
    Cheers
    jag2x
     
    LG, Aug 3, 2003
    #1
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  2. I have an Epson 3200. I use it for medium format (mostly 6 x 7) and
    large format (4 x 5), almost entirely negative color or b/w. See
    www.math.northwestern.edu/~len/photos/pages/e2450.html for some
    examples. The scans were done with the Epson 2450, but the 3200 only
    has at most a 10 percent higher resolution of small detail, and is
    similar to the 2450 in other respects.

    The Epson 3200 is not adequate for high quality 35 mm work, but it
    produces quite acceptable scans for medium and large format. Since I
    scan most negatives, dmax is not a problem for me. When I use slide
    film, I'm very careful about exposure, so I haven't usually had any
    problems with the dmax of 3.4 of the scanner, but I get pretty close.

    I use Vuescan to scan, and it does most of the work of dealing with the
    density range. I use its settings for black and white points to make
    sure I use the full range of values without clipping highlights or
    shadows. There is also a brightness control which is really a gamma
    multiplier.

    If your negatives are dark, that means the film was overexposed or
    overdeveloped or both. Vuescan used with this scanner doesn't have any
    trouble with such negatives in my experience. Slides on the other hand
    will be dark if they are underexposed. Slide film should generally be
    slightly underexposed rather than slightly overexposed, but accurate
    exposure is much more important than for negative film. If film is
    underexposed, there is a limit to what you can do with it, since detail
    in the shadows that isn't captured on film can'be be scanned no matter
    what you do.
     
    Leonard Evens, Aug 3, 2003
    #2
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  3. LG

    Ptarmigan Guest

    | LG wrote:
    | > Hi all,
    | >
    | > Looking at the
    | > Canon CS9900F
    | > Epson 3200
    | > Microtek 6800
    | > Film scanning mainly, has anybody had any experience with these
    | > scanners. Tell me what you think? What sort of work do you usually scan?
    | >
    | > What res? Sweet spots on the scanners?
    | >
    | > Will be scanning in negatives sized at 35mm, 6x6,6x7 and 6x9. My
    | > negatives/tranny are quite dark, do any of the scanners account for
    | > this? Can you set how dense the negative/tranny is?
    | > Cheers
    | > jag2x
    | >
    |
    | I have an Epson 3200. I use it for medium format (mostly 6 x 7) and
    | large format (4 x 5), almost entirely negative color or b/w. See
    | www.math.northwestern.edu/~len/photos/pages/e2450.html for some
    | examples. The scans were done with the Epson 2450, but the 3200 only
    | has at most a 10 percent higher resolution of small detail, and is
    | similar to the 2450 in other respects.
    |
    | The Epson 3200 is not adequate for high quality 35 mm work, but it
    | produces quite acceptable scans for medium and large format. Since I
    | scan most negatives, dmax is not a problem for me. When I use slide
    | film, I'm very careful about exposure, so I haven't usually had any
    | problems with the dmax of 3.4 of the scanner, but I get pretty close.
    |
    | I use Vuescan to scan, and it does most of the work of dealing with the
    | density range. I use its settings for black and white points to make
    | sure I use the full range of values without clipping highlights or
    | shadows. There is also a brightness control which is really a gamma
    | multiplier.
    |
    | If your negatives are dark, that means the film was overexposed or
    | overdeveloped or both. Vuescan used with this scanner doesn't have any
    | trouble with such negatives in my experience. Slides on the other hand
    | will be dark if they are underexposed. Slide film should generally be
    | slightly underexposed rather than slightly overexposed, but accurate
    | exposure is much more important than for negative film. If film is
    | underexposed, there is a limit to what you can do with it, since detail
    | in the shadows that isn't captured on film can'be be scanned no matter
    | what you do.
    |
    | --
    | Leonard Evens 847-491-5537
    | Dept. of Mathematics, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL 60208


    I have an Epson Filmscan 300 (SCSI) which has been refurbished by Epson
    costing £200 for sale. I'm happy to let it go for £50 if anyone is
    interested and it is in fully working condition. It comes with a SCSI card
    but the card is NOT recognisedc under Win XP so a new card would be
    required. Its just lying in a cupboard doing nothing so if anyone is
    interestded please let me know via .
    I'm in Edinburgh - Scotland.
    Regars
    Brian
     
    Ptarmigan, Aug 3, 2003
    #3
  4. LG

    Jeff Novick Guest

    I've used the 2450 for 35mm, MF, & LF. I think the quality for MF and LF is
    much better than for 35mm. When you compare a scan from the 2450 with a
    dedicated film scanner, the difference is noticeable. While you can get an
    8"x10" print out of the 2450, you will get a better one out of most
    dedicated film scanners. I wish it were otherwise!

     
    Jeff Novick, Aug 4, 2003
    #4
  5. LG

    el sid Guest

    i guess i should have made more clear , that the epson 2450, while usable as
    a 35mm scanner, is slower, has less dynamic range, more electronic noise
    scanning underexposed films than a 35mm film scanner. the ROC and SHO
    programs are very helpful with old color slides or negatives. that software
    is included in the Ice cubed programs that is part of a film scanner such
    as the nikon . after using the epson 2450 for finding out how to make scans
    from faded and color changed slides and negatives, i am about to buy a 35mm
    film scanner such as nikon , or maybe the new minolta 5400. I will stick to
    the epson for scanning of medium format up to 4x5 size b+w negatives.
     
    el sid, Aug 4, 2003
    #5
  6. LG

    Bowser Guest

    What the other guy said...

    I have the 3200, and it's an excellent conventional scanner, but merely OK
    for film. My basis for comparison is a Nikon 8000ED film scanner. The Epson
    is OK for MF film, bad for 35mm film, and neither is in the same
    neighborhood as the Nikon 8000ED, which is sharper, and captures lots more
    detail than the Epson.
     
    Bowser, Aug 5, 2003
    #6
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