Film Scanner: Nikon vs Minolta

Discussion in 'Minolta' started by Mike - EMAIL IGNORED, Dec 11, 2004.

  1. I am now considering Nikon 5000 and Minolta 5400. My criteria
    are resolution and reliability. Speed is not important, within
    reason. Any opinions? Other suggestions?
    Thanks,
    Mike.
     
    Mike - EMAIL IGNORED, Dec 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. I should probably add Nikon Coolscan V to the list.
    Mike.
     
    Mike - EMAIL IGNORED, Dec 11, 2004
    #2
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  3. Mike - EMAIL IGNORED

    Tony Guest

    Nikon Service is a strong consideration. They are incompetent and arrogant.
    359 dollars and two shippings over 2 months to 'repair' my Nikon 4000 and it
    now operates at 1/3rd the speed it used to (45 minutes to scan a negative at
    full resolution with ICE). Furthermore Nikon stopped answering emails when I
    complained about this.
    Buy the Minolta - they cannot possible be worse than the bastards at Nikon
    Service.
     
    Tony, Dec 11, 2004
    #3
  4. Mike - EMAIL IGNORED

    Alan Browne Guest

    A brief summary of other M v. N scanner threads goes:

    speed, less color fooling around: Nikon
    higher resolution, lower price : Minolta

    I have the 5400 and of course my perfectly unbaised view is that it is a
    wonderful machine and beats the crap out of that Nikon thing. ;-)

    I've seen many full-res scans from the Nikon and they are, of course, every bit
    as good as the Minolta. Of course the Minolta gives you 82% more pixels at full
    res.

    The Nikon has the additional advantage of having an attachement to do batches of
    slides (50), so a lot can be doen while you're sleeping or working on other
    things. This is the one thing I wish the Minolta had.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 11, 2004
    #4
  5. (Alan Browne) wrote:
    I've seen many full-res scans from the Nikon and they are, of course,
    every bit as good as the Minolta.
    =============================

    If Minolta gives you 82% more pixels at full res, then how is it that,
    full-res scans from the Nikon are every bit as good as the Minolta V?



    Cody,
    Lunch with a Wise man is better than a gift from a fool.

    http://community-2.webtv.net/AnOvercomer02/PhotographyLinks
     
    AnOvercomer 02, Dec 12, 2004
    #5
  6. Mike - EMAIL IGNORED

    Alan Browne Guest

    I didn't phrase that very well, did I?

    To the limit of the Nikon's resolution it performs very well. Large prints made
    with the Minolta could not be made with the Nikon.

    Cheers,
    Alan.
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 12, 2004
    #6
  7. Mike - EMAIL IGNORED

    The Dave© Guest

    How important is ICE? Does Minolta have something similar, or does it
    not matter in some way?
     
    The Dave©, Dec 12, 2004
    #7
  8. The FAQ says it does have Digital ICE. This generally uses the IR (infrared) channel to locate the dust and artifacts on the film to
    filter them out.

    Maybe Alan can tell you what ICE is supplied with the 5400, my Elite II has ICE3 which was from ASF and had ROC and GEM ( color
    restoration and Grain management).

    I would recomend the Minolta. Based on the film holders.

    Cheers
     
    Martin Riddle, Dec 12, 2004
    #8
  9. Mike - EMAIL IGNORED

    Alan Browne Guest

    ICE is the clincher. Some dust cannot be safely or easilly removed, scratches
    are simply there. ICE is essential. The 5400 has ICE. (As do the Nikon
    4000/5000, Coolscan V ED)

    http://www.aliasimages.com/ScanScratch.htm

    Just mouse over the image to see post-ICE.

    Cheers,
    Alan.
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 12, 2004
    #9
  10. Mike - EMAIL IGNORED

    Alan Browne Guest

    Per the spec, just "ICE", no version or flavour. Includes ROC/GEM as well.
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 12, 2004
    #10
  11. [...]

    I have read elsewhere that 4000 is sufficient for most films, and for
    these films, 5400 will not gain anything. Now the films I use are
    color negative professional such as NPS, and Kodak films including
    Portra and Ultra, with speeds of 100-160. I enlarge to 12"x18".

    Do I gain from the 5400?

    Thanks,
    Mike.
     
    Mike - EMAIL IGNORED, Dec 12, 2004
    #11
  12. Mike - EMAIL IGNORED

    Bill Tuthill Guest

    Mike, do you want to scan Kodachrome or traditional B&W film?
    If so the Minolta 5400 is a clear choice due to more-diffuse light
    or something. Most owners of Nikon scanners complain about this.

    Alan's summary is good: speed => Nikon, high resolution => Minolta.
    He forgot to add that Vuescan supports Nikon better, and that the
    Nikon scanners (except with extra cost FH-3 film holder) crop more.
     
    Bill Tuthill, Dec 12, 2004
    #12
  13. Mike - EMAIL IGNORED

    Alan Browne Guest

    If you print 18x12 at 300dpi, then the Nikon just squeezes in there with a
    little crop margin.
    Yes. I scan Portra 160NC (exposed at 100) and it is fabulously detailed. The
    5400 GETS that detail. Allows printing to 25.5 x 17 (which I have not tried to
    date, largest prints have been 8x10.5 to 8x12 (Epson 785EX or lab printer).

    http://www.aliasimages.com/ScanEx.htm shows in a few steps where the 5400 is
    getting to the limit of what is available out of the film (E100GX in this case)
    using this kind of scanner.

    A drum scan (with oil) would probably get more and cleaner detail yet.

    Cheers,
    Alan.
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 12, 2004
    #13
  14. Mike - EMAIL IGNORED

    Alan Browne Guest

    The recent 8.1.12 Vuescan is purported to fix the streaking issue with the 5400
    (and other Minoltas?) according to Robert Feinman on the comp.periphs.scanners
    NG. I've DL'd .12 but I haven't tried it yet. The s/w has since gone to .13 .

    The Vuescan site states (.12):
    # Improved scan quality on Minolta Scan Elite 5400
    # Improved infrared cleaning on Minolta scanners

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 12, 2004
    #14
  15. [...]

    This information is excellent for my purposes. Now my wife has some
    Kodachrome slides from her father that she wasts to scan. Today, she
    told me that there are about 1000 such slides, a bit more than I
    imagined. Is there any automation available for this?

    Thanks again for your help.

    Mike.
     
    Mike - EMAIL IGNORED, Dec 13, 2004
    #15
  16. Mike - EMAIL IGNORED

    Alan Browne Guest

    As mentioned elsewhere, you can purchase a feeder for the Nikon that will hold
    50 slides and it will go through them while you sleep.

    I'd also suggest that many peoples collections of Kodachrome can stand a good
    editing before scanning. That is, there may only be 50 images worth scanning in
    the whole pile.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 13, 2004
    #16
  17. Mike - EMAIL IGNORED

    Bill Tuthill Guest

    But if you print at 360 dpi on an Epson, or at 400 dpi on an Agfa d-Lab.2
    or newer Durst Lambda, you need the extra 5400 resolution.
     
    Bill Tuthill, Dec 13, 2004
    #17
  18. Mike - EMAIL IGNORED

    Alan Browne Guest

    That's a point many manage to avoid considering ... scanning is always for the
    output. Around here, one is more likely to run into Frontiers, Kodak and
    Noritsu's. I don't know if there is even one Agfa in the greater Montreal area.

    You can usually set the print density lower for larger prints, and since the
    print is viewed at a greater distance, that lower print density won't be
    perceptible.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 13, 2004
    #18
  19. [...]

    Good advice, which I will mention to my wife. Unfortunately, we share a
    common trait: we are both incurable pack rats.

    With regard to the technology, at appears that there is a trade off:
    automated operation vs higher resolution. Too bad.

    Mike.
     
    Mike - EMAIL IGNORED, Dec 14, 2004
    #19
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