Florescent vs. incandescent fading

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Ric Trexell, Mar 29, 2007.

  1. Ric Trexell

    Ric Trexell Guest

    I read the other day that florescent light will cause photos to turn green,
    or maybe it is more correct to say they will destroy the other colors
    leaving only the greenish tint. I thought all light would do that over
    time. If we are going to be switching more and more to these energy saving
    florescent lights, this is going to be more common. I assume that this is
    true whether we are talking about those printed from an ink jet (or any
    computer printer) as well as wet lab prints. What have you heard? Ric in
    Wisconsin.
    P.S. Some type of glass will prevent this?
     
    Ric Trexell, Mar 29, 2007
    #1
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  2. Ric Trexell

    ray Guest

    There might be a difference between dye based prints and pigment based -
    any experts?
     
    ray, Mar 29, 2007
    #2
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  3. Ric Trexell

    Stan Beck Guest

    When framing, us UV glass - costs a bit more, but it reduces fading due to
    UV light. Looking at it on edge, it has a pinkish color.

    --
    I really hate to eat on an empty stomach.

    Stan Beck > From New Orleans to Brandon MS
    To reply, remove 101 from address.
    ***
     
    Stan Beck, Mar 29, 2007
    #3

  4. Worth remembering that whilst there is a UV component from fluorescent lights,
    the amount of energy is very low compared to sunlight. For instance, it'll
    take a while to get a tan in the hospital.
     
    Richard Polhill, Mar 30, 2007
    #4
  5. Ric Trexell

    Stan Beck Guest

    Actually, I have had prints in an office under fluorescent light, and they
    faded badly in a few years.

    --
    I really hate to eat on an empty stomach.

    Stan Beck > From New Orleans to Brandon MS
    To reply, remove 101 from address.
    ***
     
    Stan Beck, Mar 30, 2007
    #5
  6. Ric Trexell

    Ric Trexell Guest

    **************************************************************
    Thank you to all that replied. The reason I asked was because I donated
    some of my enlargements to my local nursing home. I suggested they not be
    put where the sun could shine directly on them. Ofcourse all the lights in
    the hallways are florescent. As for glass, they can not have glass any more
    as that can be knocked off and break. Now they have to be plexiglass which
    as we all know will turn yellow in a few years and you won't be able to see
    anything. I guess they will just have to remove the plexiglass in a few
    years and just display them out in the open. (Like that is going to work.)
    Thanks again. Ric in Wisconsin.
     
    Ric Trexell, Mar 30, 2007
    #6
  7. Ric Trexell

    Joel Guest

    *If* you print your own photo using inkjet printer then the color may
    depend on the ink, paper, and the combination of ink & paper. Some color
    may fade faster than other which often cause lot of DOTs

    That's my own experience with inkjet printer I did many years ago when
    printlab wasn't available or lot more expensive than now. And I haven't
    printed with inkjet for many years now.
     
    Joel, Mar 30, 2007
    #7
  8. Ric Trexell

    Ric Trexell Guest

    Wisconsin.

    *If* you print your own photo using inkjet printer then the color may
    depend on the ink, paper, and the combination of ink & paper. Some color
    may fade faster than other which often cause lot of DOTs

    That's my own experience with inkjet printer I did many years ago when
    printlab wasn't available or lot more expensive than now. And I haven't
    printed with inkjet for many years now.
    ********************************************************
    Joel: The enlargements that I donated were 16 X 20's. I only wish I could
    afford a printer that will print that size. Maybe some day. Ric in Wisc.
     
    Ric Trexell, Mar 31, 2007
    #8
  9. It could be that they meant the white balance of flourescent light is
    very green. That is certainly the case and it produces horrible
    portrait shots.

    See
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_temperature#Spectral_power_distribution_plot
    for a nice diagram.
     
    Brendan Gillatt, Mar 31, 2007
    #9
  10. Ric Trexell

    Tiffany S. Guest

    Taking photos under fluorescent light causes them to have a green tint
    if they are not white-balanced properly, but exposing *prints* to
    fluorescent light will *not* cause them to turn green.
     
    Tiffany S., Apr 1, 2007
    #10
  11. Ric Trexell

    Stan Beck Guest

    Yes they will. UV (fluorescent light is high in UV) light fades the reds
    first, then the yellows, which leaves the blue green colors. This is more
    apparent with dye based colors, and less noticeable with pigment colors.

    Density is a factor, too - which is why watercolor paintings require more
    protection from UV than oil paintings using the same pigments.

    --
    I really hate to eat on an empty stomach.

    Stan Beck > From New Orleans to Brandon MS
    To reply, remove 101 from address.
    ***
     
    Stan Beck, Apr 1, 2007
    #11
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