Flying Wing revisited:

Discussion in 'Photography' started by philo, Oct 11, 2012.

  1. philo

    philo Guest

    In regards to my comments a few weeks back on the "Warbird" thread I
    mentioned that I had seen a "flying wing" type of plane somewhere around
    1955 but was informed they were all out of service well before then.

    I wrote to the EAA to see if there was more info
    and here is the important part of their reply:

    (begin quote)

    ___________________________


    They were definitely performing flight testing into the 50’s with flying
    wings. I hope this helps. Have a great day!


    Benjamin Crow, EAA #701547

    Commercial ASEL/AMEL, CFI, CFII

    Membership Services Representative

    EAA-The Spirit of Aviation


    ____________________


    (end of quote)


    So maybe my memory *is* as good as I thought it was
     
    philo, Oct 11, 2012
    #1
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  2. philo

    Savageduck Guest

    ....or maybe Ben Crow is taking "into the 50's" literally. You will
    note, he didn't pin himself down to 1955. "Taken out of service" is
    putting it lightly, they were all scrapped by December 1953, and none
    flew after April 1951.

    April 26, 1951 is "into the 50's", that was the last of the program
    test flights. Few to none of those tests would have been flown in
    Wisconsin, since all were flown in California and Nevada, with one
    cross country flight to Andrews AFB. The DOD scrapping order started in
    1951.
    ....and most importantly, the last of that generation, YB-49A was
    scrapped at the Northrop facility in Ontario, California in December
    1953.

    That left the only survivor of the program, N9MB, which didn't fly
    between 1947 to 1981, and was only restored to a flyable state in 2001.
     
    Savageduck, Oct 11, 2012
    #2
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  3. philo

    Chemiker Guest

    Funny, I saw one from my front yard in Middlesex County, NJ. We moved
    into that house Dec 1950. That's nowhere close to CA or NV.... Maybe
    they were looking for Andrews?

    a-
     
    Chemiker, Oct 11, 2012
    #3
  4. philo

    philo Guest



    I should have taken a photo I guess !
     
    philo, Oct 11, 2012
    #4
  5. philo

    Whiskers Guest


    <cough> <cough> Northrop weren't the only people experimenting with flying
    wings; the British Armstrong Whitworth AW52 was still flying in 1954,
    according to Wikipedia. The Avro Vulcan could easily be mistaken for a
    flying wing, and was flying from 1952 - and one of them still is, for
    airshows etc.
     
    Whiskers, Oct 11, 2012
    #5
  6. philo

    philo Guest


    Thank you.

    Though I apparently could not have seen a YB-49 I am glad to learn that
    there were other "flying wing" type planes
     
    philo, Oct 11, 2012
    #6
  7. philo

    Savageduck Guest

    I agree many of the "delta" bombers and fighters of the fifties could
    well be termed "flying wings". Of the three British "V" Bombers, only
    the "Vulcan" could be mistaken for a flying wing.
    <
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/21/Vulcan.filton.arp.750pix.jpg< http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f2/Avvulcan_1_2.png >

    Britain also had in the same period (1951-67) the Gloster Javelin, a
    Delta wing fighter.

    Canada had the Avro CF-105 Arrow.

    U.S. Delta wing aircraft of the fifties, which could well have been
    seen in the 1954-1960 period, and might be termed by some as a "flying
    wing" were:

    F-102 Delta Dagger
    <
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8e/Convair_F-102_Delta_Dagger.svgF-106 Delta Dart
    <
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped....svg/1000px-F-106_3-View_line_art.svg.pngB-58 Hustler
    < http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ee/B-58_3view.png >

    A-4 SkyHawk, an almost delta.
     
    Savageduck, Oct 11, 2012
    #7
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