For the duck

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by PeterN, Jan 17, 2014.

  1. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

    PeterN, Jan 17, 2014
    #1
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  2. PeterN

    Savageduck Guest

    much Irish in this lad. My wife's family on the other hand had a pretty
    solid "Orange" connection, with a grandfather who was a surgeon in the
    Royal Ulster constabulary.
    Somehow the reflections seem to work in a strange way.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 17, 2014
    #2
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  3. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

    this was the explanation given to me at the antique car museum in Ft.
    Lauderdale.

    I did not make this video, but the guy explaining the origin is the
    curator of the museum. As you can tell the term "paddy wagon," wsa used
    by the police. Though the origin of the name is uncertain, it is
    generally considered to be American..


    <

    The museum was an interesting place to visit, even if the photo ops were
    not to my taste. I spent a few hours there. You and many other
    affictinodos could easily spend a full day, and come back the next.
     
    PeterN, Jan 17, 2014
    #3
  4. PeterN

    Savageduck Guest

    I guess that is one version of the origin of "Paddy Wagon". There seem
    to be two versions, the one given in that video, and the one based on
    the large percentage of police in early American police forces having
    Irish heritage.

    My official vehicles were limited to the Plymouth Fury III, Chevy
    Caprice 9C1 Police Special (that was a truly hot performing vehicle!),
    and Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptors.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 17, 2014
    #4
  5. PeterN

    Tim Conway Guest

    hmmm. memories...I've sat in the back of one or two Ford Crown Victoria
    Police Interceptors over the years. I always thought they were nice cars,
    but with all the protective armor, not very comfortable for overweight
    people of interest like me. LOL.

    Tim
     
    Tim Conway, Jan 17, 2014
    #5
  6. PeterN

    Savageduck Guest

    Aah! You have experienced the hose down, puke, piss, & blood easy clean
    up, hard shell rear seat modification. Those were standard in most of
    the patrol cruisers. Those were also not that comfortable for large
    cops as the front seat travel was limited by the divider cage.
    The most uncomfortable law enforcement vehicle I remember were the CHP
    Mustangs of the 1984-96 period, which were filled with equipment
    leaving little room for the driver, let alone a right seat passenger.
    Some of the unmarked Caprice 9C1's and Crown Vic's came without the
    hard rear seats. Some just had the protective cage, and few were
    indistinguishable from a civilian sedan, but still had the performance
    package.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 18, 2014
    #6
  7. PeterN

    Tony Cooper Guest

    What I've never understood is how a police person manages to sit in
    less than total discomfort in any police vehicle. With all that stuff
    I see on their belts, something has to be prodding and poking them any
    way they squirm around.

    I think this is why they make as many traffic stops as they do. They
    don't think a burned out taillight is that much of a problem, but they
    want to get out of the car.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 18, 2014
    #7
  8. PeterN

    Tim Conway Guest

    Haaaa! And not to mention all the electronic gadgets like laptops and
    etc...If I were wearing all that stuff on my belt, my pants would be
    dragging. Much worse than any camera bag I ever carried. LOL.

    Also,;; when I was in the rear of one, I didn't notice any unpleasant smells
    or other nasties to the officer's credit or the garage's credit.

    Tim
     
    Tim Conway, Jan 18, 2014
    #8
  9. PeterN

    Savageduck Guest

    You have no idea of just how uncomfortable a duty belt weighted down
    with a pistol, at least two spare magazines, one & sometimes two pairs
    of handcuffs, an OC pepper spray canister, sometimes a taser, a loop
    for a side-handle baton (or a monadnock expandable baton in its
    holster), and a radio, can be. A day wearing that load can leave you
    with a very real backache. Add to that a ballistic vest, then try
    running while wearing that lot.

    I was thankful when I didn't have to carry that load of equipment on a
    regular basis. That was a huge incentive for promotion and getting out
    of uniform.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 18, 2014
    #9
  10. PeterN

    Savageduck Guest

    A convenient hose is a wonderful thing.
    You should try driving one of those cars while you have a drunk puking
    so violently in the back, it sounds like a toilet flushing, and you
    have this slop intruding to the front under the seat. Even in bad
    weather you have to have the windows down up front.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 18, 2014
    #10
  11. PeterN

    Tim Conway Guest

    Yep. That's another credit to the patience and long suffering of a good
    many officers in keeping their cool under those conditions. I think I would
    get quite a bit angry.

    Tim
     
    Tim Conway, Jan 18, 2014
    #11
  12. PeterN

    Robert Coe Guest

    You have no idea of just how uncomfortable a duty belt weighted down
    : with a pistol, at least two spare magazines, one & sometimes two pairs
    : of handcuffs, an OC pepper spray canister, sometimes a taser, a loop
    : for a side-handle baton (or a monadnock expandable baton in its
    : holster), and a radio, can be. A day wearing that load can leave you
    : with a very real backache. Add to that a ballistic vest, then try
    : running while wearing that lot.
    :
    : I was thankful when I didn't have to carry that load of equipment on a
    : regular basis. That was a huge incentive for promotion and getting out
    : of uniform.

    Yup! Next time I'm decked out for an event with two cameras, two flashes,
    battery pack, spare batteries, etc., I'll force myself to remember that it
    could be a LOT worse! ;^)

    BTW, our cops don't usually appear to be quite as burdened down as you
    describe. Has more modern equipment improved the situation in the time since
    you retired?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jan 18, 2014
    #12
  13. PeterN

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Something like this?

    http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/AntiGun-Rally/i-rZ4Xzrf/0/X2/2013-07-17-12-X2.jpg
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 18, 2014
    #13
  14. PeterN

    J. Clarke Guest

    J. Clarke, Jan 18, 2014
    #14
  15. PeterN

    Savageduck Guest

    Take a closer look, you might be surprised at what they are carrying.
    In some ways they are carrying more now, but moving from leather to
    nylon takes several pounds off. Unless they are just parking
    enforcement officers.

    Your typical beat/patrol cop will carry a firearm + spare ammo (one or
    two extra magazines, or speed loaders for revolvers), one or two pairs
    of handcuffs, and a radio minimum. Then depending on department/agency
    policy, add OC pepper spray and/or a Taser, a baton of some sort ( the
    old night stick, a side-handle baton, or an expandable Monadnock type)
    and under that these days is usually a ballistic vest of some sort. On
    hot days the vest can be a PIA as it is not exactly well ventilated. We
    had to wash the vest covers regularly otherwise you started to smell
    like a very old locker room.

    Once you moved along the promotion line you seem to shed equipment. I
    eventually got down to a gun + spare magazine, and a pair of flex
    cuffs. Other stuff I carried in the car. However those guys working in
    tactical units (SWAT) they get loaded down with even more stuff.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 18, 2014
    #15
  16. PeterN

    Savageduck Guest

    Savageduck, Jan 18, 2014
    #16
  17. PeterN

    PeterN Guest

  18. PeterN

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I seldom see an officer with only one phone. I don't know if the
    second phone is personal or one on a different band-width. They also
    have a shoulder mike/earpiece.

    There's a local female officer who must have met the minimum height
    standard by moussing her hair. I don't see how she manages with all
    that stuff.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 18, 2014
    #18
  19. PeterN

    Eric Stevens Guest

  20. PeterN

    George Kerby Guest

    Interesting. The way I heard it from an Irishman from the Bronx, whose
    father, and grand-father were NYFD, was that it was a 'slur' to The Irish
    immigrants, who were usually the occupants or 'guests' of said vehicles, as
    they were on their way to overnight facilities because of overconsumption of
    adult beverages. The often maligned Irish were judged to be 'drunks' by the
    police and others, and the popular Irish name "Paddy" was a generalization
    for the population of Irish in and around The Big Apple, much like the
    unfair stereotype of other groups like the Jews and Mexicans. So the vehicle
    was known originally as "Paddy's Wagon". Don't know how much of it is truth,
    but it sounds good, LOL!
     
    George Kerby, Jan 18, 2014
    #20
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